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Volume 10, 1877
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C. Boldenarum, White.

G.—I have two or three varieties, and am not quite clear as to which Mr. Butler's description, in his “Catalogue of Lepidoptera of New Zealand,” p. 3, refers. The figures 8 and 9 in plate at the end of his catalogue most nearly agree with the variety found (or formerly found, for I have not seen it for some years past) within the city of Christchurch, on some flat sandy waste ground. Mr. Butler, referring to the figures, states, “the bands and spots on the under-surface of secondaries have been made altogether too dark,” which is not the case with the Christchurch specimens, the latter being generally darker than shown in Mr. Butler's figure, though some individuals are not quite so dark.

The varieties appear to be due to locality, as the individuals of each locality vary but little.

There are three localities where I have taken this insect, namely, Christchurch; Drayton Station, on the plains near Mount Hutt; spurs of mountains near Castle Hill Station; and the top of the Mount Hutt range—all in the Canterbury province.

The distinctive characters of the varieties may be better understood by the following tabular arrangement.

Picture icon

To illustrate paper by R. W. Fereday.

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Christchurch. Drayton Station. Mount Hutt and spurs of mountains near Castle Hill Station.
Male.
Primaries.
Upper side: Dark dusky brown mingled with fulvous; disc shot with glistening purple Same as Christchurch form Reddish-fulvous, irrorated with dark dusky brown.
Costa and base of principal nervures irrorated with golden yellow Same as Christchurch form Otherwise same as Christchurch form.
A more or less indistinct sub-marginal band of black ill-defined spots, upon the inner side of which are bright spots of violet; in some specimens a few small dots of violet represent a marginal series Do. Marginal series of violet dots distinct, otherwise same as Christchurch form.
A more or less indistinct curved discal band of black ill-defined spots, followed in some specimens by fulvous dashes Do. Curved discal band very distinct, the spots rather arched, otherwise same as Christchurch form.
Cilia, brownish dirty grey Do. Same as Christchurch form.
Under side: Tawny; sub-marginal band of blackish spots bordered externally and internally with white The tawny colour paler and more dirty; the spots of the sub-maiginal band dark grey, with a patch of white on each spot Pale ochreish-yellow, in other respects same as Drayton form.
Secondaries. Upper side: Dark bronzy brown; markings not visible Dark bronzy brown; a dot in the discoidal cell and a patch closing the cell; a curved discal and a sub-marginal macular band and a dark marginal border; the bands and border dusky black, and in the intervening spaces are indistinct fulvous spots, those between the marginal border and the sub-marginal band being reniform; all the markings more or less indistinct in different individuals Reddish-fulvous; the basal portion of the disc shot with purple; the dot and patch in discoidal cell same as the Drayton form; the maculæ of the discal band arched; the maculæ of the sub-marginal band wedge-shaped and with small violet pupils; all the markings distinct and well defined.
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[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

Christchurch. Drayton Station. Mount Hutt and spurs of mountains near Castle Hill Station.
Male.Under side: Ground colour varying from grey to brown; a broad and very irregular transverse central shade of deep rich brown, approaching to black in some specimens, and edged with white; a sub-marginal band of black roundish spots, each spot margined externally with white and inwardly with a white supercilium immediately followed by a brown one; several sub-basal discoidal spots of dark brown or black edged with white upon a brown ground; all the markings very distinct Markings pale, and varying from a silvery to an ochreish-grey tint Pale grey markings very indistinct.
Female.Primaries.Upper side: Dusky fulvous; not shot with purple; markings similar to those of the male; the violet spots obsolete or nearly so Rich bronzy brown; the violet spots very bright and distinct; cilia much whiter grey than in the Christchurch form, and distinctly chequered with dark Pale fulvous; in other respects similar to the Drayton form.
Under side: Paler, and sub-marginal spots more obscure than in the male, otherwise similar Similar to male Similar to male.
Secondaries.Upper side: Same colour as primaries; markings similar to those of secondaries of male of Mount Hutt form, only more obscure and without the violet pupils Same colour as primaries; markings similar to the Christchurch form, only less obscure Same colour as primaries; markings similar to those of secondaries of the Mount Hutt form.
Under side: Markings more or less obscure and general colour browner than that of the male, otherwise similar Similar to male of Christchurch form, only that the central shade is narrower; markings very bright Similar to male.
Exp.: Male, 10‴ to 11.½‴; Female, 10‴ to 10.½‴ Exp.: Male, 9.½‴ to 11‴; Female, 10.½‴ Exp.: Male, 9‴ to 11‴; Female, 9.½‴ to 11.½‴.
Time of capture: December* Time of capture: January and February* Time of capture: Jan. and Feb.*

Fig. H represents the upper side of the female of the Drayton form.

" " 5 " " the upper side of the male.

" " I " " the upper side of the female of the Mount Hutt form.

" " 6 " " the upper side of the male.

" " 7 " " the under side of same.

" " 8 " " the under side of the male of the Christchurch form.

[Footnote] * The times of capture given here are when the specimens were taken, being the only times I visited the localities.

[Footnote] * The times of capture given here are when the specimens were taken, being the only times I visited the localities.

[Footnote] * The times of capture given here are when the specimens were taken, being the only times I visited the localities.

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If the Mount Hutt or the Castle Hill form is a distinct species, as it possibly may be proved to be, I propose for it the name of Tama, after a traditionary Maori chief of that name; and should it be held to be a variety only, the name will serve to distinguish it as the mountain form.

The individuals of the Mount Hutt and Castle Hill form were taken in places where Donatia novœ-zealandiœ grows, and seeing them hovering about and settling upon patches of that plant in a manner indicating the deposit of their eggs, I carefully searched the plants, and succeeded in finding one larva, of which I made a coloured drawing and wrote out a description. The description has unfortunately been mislaid, but the drawing, a copy of which accompanies this paper, I have preserved. From the drawing and from recollection, I give the following description of the larva:—

Onisciform; pubescent; pale green; dorsal line consisting of a dark purplish-brown conical spot on the fourth and following segments, the apex of each cone pointing towards the head and joining the base of the preceding one at the joint of the segment, the cones margined with white; outside and round the white is a margin of dull red; on the side a row of pale pinkish oblique stripes, blended on the lower side with dull red; the red extending thence to below the spiracles, except on the posterior side of each segment, where a green colour intervenes and is blended with the red; the angles formed by the oblique stripes are shaded with a dark colour. On the second segment is a dorsal diamond-shaped dark purplish-brown spot, with a longitudinal streak of white in its centre. I kept the larva for some time, and fed it upon Donatia, hoping to obtain from it a pupa and imago, but, after being apparently full-fed and retreating to the root of the food-plant, it died, without assuming the pupa state. One egg, which I also found at the same time, did not produce a larva.

Fig. a represents the larva magnified; b, head front segments, also magnified; and c, the natural size.

The larva is so characteristic of the genus that there can be little doubt it would have produced a specimen of the Castle Hill form, had it lived and passed through its changes to maturity. I know of no other insect to which it could belong; but there is not sufficient evidence to determine the fact.