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Volume 15, 1882
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Art. XLVI.—Description of a new Species of Senecio.

[Read before the Wellington Philosophical Society, 28th February, 1883.]

Senecio muelleri.

A Large shrub or small tree 10–18 feet high, with spreading branches. Leaves 3″–7″ long, 1¼”–2½” wide, crowded near the ends of the branches,

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broadly lanceolate-acuminate, or ovate-acuminate, narrowed into a broad base, sessile, quite entire, densely clothed with white tomentum beneath. Flowers in erect terminal panicles sparingly leafy, 4″–8″ long; branches and involucre glandular or glandular pubescent: heads on short pedicels, involucral leaves in one series: ray-florets 12–14, narrow, contorted: disc florets about 20, perfect, regular, anthers with short tails. Achenes grooved, pappus white, scabrid.

Hab. Herekopere Island, T. Kirk; South Cape Island. Not observed on Stewart Island.

The main stem of this handsome species is often from 8″ to 12″ in diameter, branches distant, usually wide spreading and destitute of leaves below. In all stages they are thickly marked with the scars of fallen leaves. In the recent state the foliage is glossy and coriaceous, but these characters disappear in drying. After a continuance of rainy weather the tomentum becomes somewhat loose and gives a rugose appearance to the lower surface of the leaves. The bracts are always membranous, and those at the base of the panicles, which equal the ordinary leaves in size, are more or less recurved. Most frequently the panicle is simple, but occasionally its lower branches are compound; after flowering, the main axis becomes elongated and the panicle loses much of its original compactness. The panicle is always glandular and more or less viscid.

This fine plant approaches S. huntii of the Chatham Islands in habit, cicatricose branches, foliage and leafy inflorescence: but the structure of the flower allies it to S. sciadophilus and S. perdicioides, although its rays are much longer and the heads much larger. The narrow contorted yellow rays are widely different from the broad compact white rays of S. huntii: in this respect the latter resembles S. glastifolius and S. hectori.

Mr. Charles Traill of Stewart Island received living plants from the natives several years ago and has had them under cultivation, but they have not yet flowered. I collected the plant on sea-cliffs on Herekopere Island and was informed by an intelligent half-caste that he had collected it on South Cape Island. It does not appear to be known elsewhere, so that it further resembles S. huntii of Pitt Island in being restricted to a very limited area.

New Zealand botanists are specially indebted to Baron von Müeller for his excellent account of the vegetation of the Chatham Islands, so that I have great pleasure in connecting his name with so striking a plant.

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The following is a list of the best-known mineral springs, full details concerning which are to be found in the official Laboratory Reports, Trans. N.Z. Inst., and other similar publications:—

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

No Name and District. Temp, Fahr. Solid Grains per pint. Chemical Character. No. Name and District Temp, Fahr. Solid Grains per pint. Chemical Character.
Deg. Deg.
1 Ohaeawai, Auckland 60–116 16.8 Acid, Aluminous. 28 Crow's Nest Spring, Taupo 170 18.0 Saline.
2 Waiwera " 110 17.7 Alkaline, Saline. 29 Waipakahi " 98–120 2.8 Sulphurous.
3 Puriri " 60 67.1 Alkaline, Carbonates. 30 Te Hukahuka " 116 1.8 Sulphurous.
31 Tarawera " 130 12.5
4 White Island Lake, Bay of Plenty 97–212 1850.8 Strongly Acidic. 32 Parkes' Spring " Cold 25.1
33 Wangape, Waikato 160–200 6.0 Alkaline.
5 White Island Springs, Bay of Plenty 210 207.7 Strongly Acidic. 34 Onetapu " 70 58.0
6 Pink Terrace Geyser, Rotomahana 208 19.3 Sulphurous. 35 Roparoa, Waiapu Cold Saline, Bituminous.
7 White Terrace Geyser, Rotomahana 210 18.0 Alkaline. 36 Manutahi, " Cold Saline, Bituminous.
8 Turikore, Whakarewarewa 96.120 10.9 Sulphurous. 37 Pepot, " Cold Hydro-carbon Gas.
9 Te Koutu Spring, Rotorua 90.180 9.1 Alkaline.
10 Koreteoteo " 214 13.0 Alkaline Caustic. 38 Waipaoa, Poverty Bay Cold Bituminous.
11 Kuirua " 136.156 9.9 Alkaline. 39 Waipiro, Waiapu 144 Calcareous, Bituminous.
12 Manupirua, Rotoiti 107 4.1 Sulphurous.
13 Cameron's Bath " 109.115 14.3 Acid. 40 Wallingford, Wellington 60 10.4 Acid.
14 Ariki-kapakapa " 160 6.6 Acid. 41 Pahua " Cold 184.2 Alkaline.
15 Perekari " 130.150 7.0 Acid. 42 Barton's Spring " Cold
16 Ti Kute " 100.2126.1 Sulphurous. 43 Akateo (a) " Cold 62.4 Alkaline.
17 Te Mimi " 90.112 3.8 Acid. 44 " (b) " Cold 4.8 Sulphurous.
18 Te Kauwhanga " 80.100 8.0 Acid. 45 Hanmer Plain Springs, Amuri 90.104 10.8 Alkaline.
19 Painkiller Bath " 204 16.0 Acid.
20 Sulphur Bay Spring " 90.100 5.6 Acid. 46 Sumner Lake Springs, Hurunui 93 2.3 Acid, Saline.
21 Otumuhika (a) Taupo 100.150 1.5 Sulphurous.
22 " (b) " 150 3.4 Sulphurous. 47 Amberley Spring, Canterbury Cold 11.7 Chalybeate.
23 " (c) " 78 1.2 Sulphurous.
24 Ruahine " 190 19.1 Sulphurous. 48 Wickliffe Bay Spring, Otago 34.6 Saline.
25 Orakeikorako " 90.106 10.6 Acid.
26 McMurray's Bath " 126 4.2 Sulphurous. 49 Gibson's Spring, Southland Cold 2.3 Alkaline.
27 Alum Cave Spring, Taupo 60 7.1 Sulphurous.