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Volume 28, 1895
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Art. XXVIII.—Notes on some New Zealand Fishes, with Description of a New Species.

[Read before the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, 5th November, 1895.]

Plectropoma huntii, Hector.

A specimen of this fish has been sent to the Canterbury Museum by Mr. Joshua Rutland, who obtained it from Queen Charlotte Sound. He says it is very rare, and that it lives in holes among rocks, feeding on shrimps. Sometimes it comes to the surface of the water and lies on its side for a considerable time. The fin formula differs slightly from that given by Sir James Hector of the specimen from the Chatham Islands. It is as follows:-

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B. 7; D. 10/18; A. 3/7; L. lat. 46.

Total length, 8 ½in. There are villiform teeth on the jaws, palatines, and vomer, but none on the tongue.

Chironemus spectabilis, Hutton (Chilodactylus).

This species has teeth on the vomer, and should therefore be placed in Chironemus.

Agriopus peruvianus, Cuv. and Val.

Distinguished by having a small spine before each orbit. There are two specimens in the Museum collection, from Banks Peninsula.

Trachyichthys trailli, Hutton.

This species is figured in “Challenger” Reports, vol. xxii., pl. 55, fig. A.

Seriolella punctata, Forster; Descript. Anim., p. 140 (Gasterosteus); Seriolella bilineata, Hutton.

I have no doubt but that this is the long-lost fish of Forster. The mistake is due to the peculiar genus into which Forster put his fish, and from the absence in the colony of any copy of his drawing.

Evistius huttonii, Günther (Platystethus).

The new generic name is given by Dr. Theodore Gill for Platystethus, which is preoccupied.

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Cubiceps gracilis, Lowe; Gunther, “‘Challenger’ Pelagic Fishes,” pl. ii., fig. A.

A specimen in the Museum was obtained in the Christchurch market in June, 1893.

Cybium guttatum, Bloch (?); Day's “Fishes of India,” pl. lvi., fig. 4.

A damaged specimen of a Cybium, probably C. guttatum, was obtained at the Chatham Islands by Major Gascoyne, and presented to the Museum in April, 1894.

Echeneis remora, Linne.

There is a specimen in the Museum collection labelled “Wellington Harbour.”

Kathetostoma giganteum, Haast.

In my list of New Zealand fishes (Trans. N.Z. Inst., vol. xxii., p. 279) this is by accident given as a synonym of Anema monopterygium (Bloch), whereas it should have been placed with the next species on the list—K. lœve (Bloch). Haast's type, however, has no humeral spines, and may possibly be distinct.

Kathetostoma fluviatile, Hutton.

There are specimens in the Museum from the Rangitata River, forty miles from its mouth, and also from Dunedin; so that it inhabits the sea as well as the rivers. It has the same mesial occipital bony plate as K. maculatus (Forster), to which it is closely allied; but it has no scales on the sides of the tail; the humeral spines are short and obtuse, and the granulations on the opercular and cranial bones are not quite so coarse. The colouration is also slightly different; but the two species are so much alike that they are always considered to be the same by fishermen.

Parapereis gilliesii, Hutton.

A specimen which was obtained in the Christchurch market on the 27th June, 1893, is in the collection. It agrees closely with the description of the type. The name Parapercis has been given by Dr. Theodore Gill, as Percis is preoccupied.

Eleotris radiata, Quoy and Gaimard.

I have received specimens from the Chatham Islands, collected by Major Gascoyne.

Eleotris gobioides, Cuvier and Val.

I have received specimens from the Chatham Islands, collected by Major Gascoyne.

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Tripterygium dorsale, Clarke.

There is a specimen in the Museum, from Sumner.

Tripterygium robustum, Clarke.

There is a specimen in the Museum, locality unknown.

Acanthoclinus taumaka, Clarke.

There is a specimen in the Museum, from Banks Peninsula.

Crepidogaster simus, sp. nov.

D. 7; A. 7. Snout depressed, rounded, not produced, its length not quite twice the diameter of the eye, or about equal to the width of the interorbital space. Distance from the end of the dorsal, or anal, to the caudal very short, about one-fifth of the length of the caudal, or one-third of the least depth of the tail. Ventrals united to the pectorals by a membrane. Ventral sucker broader than long. Colouration uniform. Lyttelton Harbour and Chatham Islands.

Differs from C. hectoris in having the dorsal and anal fins close to the caudal. The type-specimen was presented by Mr. F. W. Tregear, on the 27th December, 1892.

Labrichthys roseipunctata, Hutton; Trans. N.Z. Inst., vol. xii., p. 455.

I omitted this species from my list of New Zealand fishes, 1889.

Labrichthys cincta, Hutton.

There is a specimen in the Museum collection, obtained in the Christchurch market.

Physiculus bacchus, Foster.

Lotella bacchus and L. rhacinus both belong to Physiculus, distinguished by the flat ventral fins.

Motella novæ-zealandiæ, Hector.

Specimens are in the Museum, from Sumner.

Anchenoceros punctatus, Hutton.

A specimen obtained in the Christchurch market, 22nd May, 1895, is in the collection.

Hyplolycodes haastii, Hector.

I think that this genus should be placed in the Ophidiidœ, on account of its wide gill-openings. The ventrals are jugular, consist of six rays, and reach to the vent when laid back.

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Genus Galaxias, Cuvier.

I divide the New Zealand species as follows:—

A.—Tail truncated or slightly rounded.

  • 1. Pectorals more than half the distance to the ventrals. Ventrals much more than half the distance to the anal.

    • G. alepidotus, Forster.

      • Length (without caudal) about four and a half times the height; least depth of the tail more than the distance between the dorsal and caudal fins. Blackish-brown, with scattered pale spots or streaks.

        Arthur River, Milford Sound; Chatham Islands.

      • Var. brocchus, Richardson.

        The pale streaks forming rings.

        Arthur River, Milford Sound; Heathcote River, Christchurch.

    • G. fasciatus, Gray = G. reticulatus, Rich.

      • Length (without caudal) five times the height; least depth of the tail equal to the distance between dorsal and caudal fins. Brown, with light-coloured transverse bands.

        North Island of New Zealand and Chatham Islands.

  • 2. Pectorals less than half the distance to the ventrals. Ventrals about half the distance to the anal.

    • G. brevipinnis, Günther.

      • Length (without caudal) about seven and a half times the height. Brownish-olive, with dark-brown reticulating bands.

        Otira River; Lake Coleridge.

      • Var. grandis, Haast.

        Dark-brown above, either uniform or with pale spots and streaks.

        Rivers of the Canterbury Plains.

B.—Caudal emarginate, pectorals less than half the distance to the ventrals.

  • G. lynx, nomen novus. G. olidus, Hutton, not of Günther. Ventrals more than half the distance to the anal. Length of the body about six and a half times the height. Yellowish- or brownish-grey, with scattered small round black spots.

    Lake Coleridge; Lake Wakatipu.

  • G. attenuatus, Jennings.

    Ventrals less than half the distance to the anal. Length of the body more than eight times the

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  • height. Greenish-yellow, more or less spotted with brown, each spot being composed of minute dots.

    Both Islands of New Zealand, and Chatham Islands.

Retropinna richardsoni, Gill.

Specimens are in the Museum, from the Chatham Islands.

Photichthys argenteus, Hutton.

This species has been figured by Dr. Günther in the Report on the Deep-sea Fishes of the “Challenger,” pl. xlv., fig. A.

Argentina elongata, Hutton.

This species is considered distinct by Dr. Günther, and is figured by him in the Report on the Deep-sea Fishes of the “Challenger,” pl. lv., fig. B.

Clupea sagax, Jenyns.

A specimen of this fish was procured in the Christchurch market on the 22nd May, 1895. The fishmonger said he had never seen one before.

Anguilla aucklandii, Richardson.

Specimens have been sent me from the Chatham Islands. I now think that what I called A. latirostris is only the young of A. aucklandii.

Anguilla australis, Richardson.

Specimens have been sent me by Major Gascoyne from the Chatham Islands.

Ophichthys novæ-zealandiæ, Hector.

This species differs from O. serpens in having only one row of teeth on the maxillary and intermaxillary bones.

Centrina bruniensis, Ogilby.

This is not C. salviana, as I supposed. The differences have been pointed out by Mr. Ogilby in the “Records of the Australian Museum,” No. 11, p. 62 (1893).

Trygon brevicaudatus, Hutton.

This may be the same as T. margarita, Günther; but that species comes from West Africa, and in the description no mention is made of any ossification on the tail.