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Volume 52, 1920
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Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors.
Wellington, 30th January, 1920.

The annual meeting of the Board of Governors was held in the Dominion Museum Library on Friday, the 30th January, 1920, at 10 a.m.

Present: Dr. L. Cockayne, President (in the chair); Mr. B. C. Aston, Professor Charles Chilton, Professor T. H. Easterfield, Mr. C. A. Ewen, Dr. F. W. Hilgendorf, Mr. H. Hill, Professor H. B. Kirk, Professor J. Malcolm, Dr. P. Marshall, Professor H. W. Segar, Professor A. P. W. Thomas, Hon. G. M. Thomson, Dr. J. Allan Thomson, and Mr. A. M. Wright.

Mr. Park attended as delegate from the Manawatu Philosophical Society, and apologized for the unavoidable absence through illness of Mr. M. A. Eliott.

The Hon. Secretary called the roll.

Apology for non-attendance was received from the Hon. Sir F. H. D Bell, Minister of Internal Affairs.

The President welcomed the new members of the Board of Governors— Mr. A. M. Wright and Professor J. Malcolm. He also stated that the Board was glad to receive Mr. Park (with power to address the meeting, but not to vote) as delegate from the Manawatu Society, especially as the important matter of the 1921 Science Congress at Palmerston North was to be considered.

Presidential Address.—Dr. L. Cockayne then delivered his presidential address (see page xxv).

On the motion of Professor Easterfield, it was resolved, That the President be thanked for his address, and be asked to allow it to be published in the Transactions.

Incorporated Societies' Reports and Balance-sheets were received and laid on the table. No reports were received from the Wanganui Philosophical Society or from the Poverty Bay Institute.

Standing Committee's Report.—The annual report of the Standing Committee was read, and adopted with a slight amendment.

Report of the Standing Committee for Year ending 31st December, 1919.

Meetings.—Ten meetings of the Standing Committee were held during the year, the attendance being as follows: Dr. Cockayne (President), 4; Professor Kirk, 9; Professor Easterfield, 8; Hon. G. M. Thomson, 2; Professor Segar, 1; Professor A. P. W. Thomas, 1; Mr. C. A. Ewen, 4; Dr. J. Allan Thomson, 7; Mr. Birks, 3; Mr. Parr, 4; and Mr. Aston, 10.

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Hector Memorial Award.—The 1919 medal and prize, which was awarded to Dr. P. W. Robertson, was handed to the Department of Internal Affairs on the 25th March, 1919, for remitting to the High Commissioner's Office for presentation to Dr. Robertson. A cable was published in the daily papers of the 12th December, 1919, announcing that the High Commissioner, Sir Thomas Mackenzie, had publicly presented the medal to Dr. Robertson in London.

War. Roll of Honour.—This has been brought up to date, and will be sent to the Hon. Editor for publication in volume 52 of the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute.

Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, volume 51, was issued to the societies in bulk in September, 1919. The Proceedings of the annual meeting in January, 1919, were published in pamphlet form, and distributed to societies on the 26th March, 1919, as well as being printed in the Transactions.

Publications.—The following have been placed on the mailing list by the Standing Committee, and will in future receive the Transactions as published:—

  • Museo Civico Storia Naturale di Genova.

  • Anales del Museo Nacional de B. Aires.

  • Adviser of Fisheries, Norway, Fiskeridirektren, Postboks, 226, Bergen.

  • Commonwealth Institute of Science and Industry.

  • International Institute of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture, Canada

  • Turnbull Library, Wellington, N.Z.

  • American Chemical Society Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.

Resolutions of the Standing Committee not otherwise mentioned in this report are—

It was resolved to present a bound copy of Maori Art to Mr. Evan Parry, to mark the New Zealand Institute's appreciation of his work in New Zealand.

It was resolved to publish the minutes of the annual meeting as soon as possible, and that the Publication Committee be instructed accordingly.

It was resolved to grant power to the Hon. Librarian to formulate certain rules to be observed by those using the Institute library, and issue certain circulars regarding library matters.

It was resolved, That the members of the Standing Committee of the New Zealand Institute desire to express their sympathy with Mrs. Broun and her daughters in the great loss which they have sustained by the death of Major Broun.

It was resolved, That Professor Easterfield, Dr. Thomson, Mr. Ewen, and the Hon. Secretary be a committee to formulate resolutions of the New Zealand Institute which have the force of regulations, in order that, where advisable, they might be gazetted.

Financial Position of the Institute.—A deputation from the Standing Committee waited upon the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs, Major Hine, in September, with reference to the financial position of the Institute and the necessity for an increased grant for general expenses. As a result the sum of £500 was placed on the supplementary estimates for the year's expenses, and a promise was given that the question of making a permanent increase to the Institute's statutory grant of £500 per annum would be favourably considered.

It is desirable that some more simple method of dealing with interest which accrues at the Savings-bank from time to time shall be devised. If some resolution were passed to the effect that all interest earned at the Savings-bank would be credited to some definite purpose it would simplify book-keeping considerably. The suggestion is made that all such interest should be credited to the Endowment Fund.

A sum of £250 voted by the Department of Internal Affairs for binding the books of the Institute library was paid into the Institute's account on the 28th March, 1919.

National Efficiency Board's Report: Census of Industries. (This was a report to the Government, which included the New Zealand Institute's Scientific and Industrial Research Committee's report: see pp. 326–27, vol. 50.) It was resolved at a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 17th January, 1919, to remind the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs (Hon. G. W. Russell) of his promise to communicate further on the making of a census of industries. At a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 11th March, 1919, Dr. J. Allan Thomson reported that Professor Easterfield and he had interviewed the Hon. the Minister (Hon. G. W. Russell) with reference to compiling a census of industries. The Minister considered it was a matter more for the Science and Art Board.

The Science and Art Board had considered the matter, and passed the following resolutions:—

“(1.) That this meeting urges upon the Government that the time has come when the establishment of a Board to superintend and organize scientific research and the advancement of industrial efficiency should no longer be delayed.

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“(2.) That the scheme adopted by the Efficiency Board, being the well-considered opinion of the scientific bodies of New Zealand, has the foremost claim on the attention of the Government.

“(3.) Pending the establishment of such a Board, that a joint committee of the New Zealand Institute and the Science and Art Board be authorized to undertake a preliminary investigation into the following matters: (a) Industrial problems requiring scientific research; (b) facilities for research in New Zealand laboratories; (c) the number and status of scientific men available for research; (d) register of research work in progress; (e) existing facilities for the training of research students; (f) existing facilities for technical education in the training of artisans; (g) existing facilities for the training of agricultural students; (h) that the sum of £250 be granted to the above committee for secretarial assistance.”

On the 3rd April, 1919, a letter, dated 14th March, 1919, was received from the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs (Hon G. W. Russell), informing the Institute that the Government could not at present see its way to adopt the report of the National Efficiency Board, but has given instructions for the compilation of an annual census of industries for the future.

The President (Dr. Cockayne), Professor Easterfield, and Dr. J. Allan Thomson gave evidence before the Parliamentary Committee on Industries, and reported that the Committee was distinctly favourable to the proposals of the Institute's Scientific and Industrial Research Committee forwarded to the Government through the National Efficiency Board.

Annual Reports' and Balance-sheets.—The annual reports and balance-sheets of the following incorporated societies had been received, and were laid on the table:—

  • Wellington Philosophical Society, up to 30th September, 1919.

  • Auckland Institute, up to 20th February, 1919.

  • Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, up to 31st October, 1919.

  • Otago Institute, up to 30th November, 1919.

  • Manawatu Philosophical Society, up to 31st October, 1919.

  • Nelson Institute, up to 31st December, 1918.

  • Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute, up to 31st December, 1918.

No reports had been received from the Poverty Bay and Wanganui societies.

Clerical Work of the Institute.—It will be necessary to appoint a permanent paid official to assist the honorary officers of the Institute. The administration of the vote for research grants has thrown much additional work on the Hon. Secretary and Hon. Treasurer. The present practice of burdening the honorary officers with a mass of routine work, which a junior office assistant could well do, is very irksome, and will result in losing the services of experienced honorary officers. What is suggested is that a paid official shall be appointed to—

  • (a.) Act as Assistant Secretary, Assistant Treasurer, Assistant Editor, and Assistant Librarian.

  • (b.) Compile indexes of the Transactions from year to year, and compile a decennial index for publication of the 41st to the 50th volume.

  • (c.) Compile catalogue cards for the International Catalogue of Scientific Literature.

  • (d.) Do such other clerical work for the Institute as is from time to time necessary.

Fellowship.—The regulations passed at the last annual meeting have been duly gazetted, and the election of the original Fellows has been held, Mr. C. A. Ewen, the Honorary Treasurer, acting as returning officer. It was found impossible to arrange for the election of four ordinary members at the annual meeting in January, as by the time the election of the Original Fellows had been completed Regulation 7 (c)—which provides that six months' notice of the names of nominees should be given to the Fellows selecting—could not be complied with. It was decided that the institution of the Fellowship of the New Zealand Institute should be explained to the scientific world by articles to be written for Nature and Science.

Kapiti Island.—A deputation from the Standing Committee—Dr. Cockayne (President), Professor Kirk, Dr. Cotton, Dr. J. Allan Thomson, and Mr. Aston—waited on the Hon. the Minister of Lands (Hon. D. H. Guthrie) with regard to Kapiti Island in particular, and in general asking for recognition of the Institute as an advisory body to the Government on all matters dealing with sanctuaries. The following is a precis of the shorthand notes of the Minister's Private Secretary:—

“Deputation to the Hon. D. H. Guthrie, Minister of Lands, Wellington.—9th July, 1919.—Introduced by Mr. W. H. Field, M.P.

“Professor Kirk stated that he would like to see the sheep difficulty dealt with. Although the Government had done a large amount of good work on Kapiti Island,

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it was being nullified by the effects of the sheep. One course was to clear out the sheep altogether and extinguish the Native titles, and another would be to stock only that part of the island which has been cleared. The general request which the Institute wished to make was that it should be recognized by the Government in all matters dealing with sanctuaries.

“The Hon. Mr. Guthrie said that, so far as his Department was concerned, the assistance of the Institute would have the fullest consideration. Apparently it was feared that the sheep would interfere with the native fauna. If at any time it were decided to use the whole of the island as a sanctuary, it would be easy to remove the sheep. He thought, however, that the matter was more in the province of the Hon the Minister of Internal Affairs.

“Dr. Allan Thomson pointed out that the only legislation dealing with the matter was embodied in the Scenery Preservation Act, which was administered by the Lands Department. The bird-life of the Dominion had been suffering through divided control, and, as a result of a conference held a few years ago, Mr. Phillips Turner and himself were appointed to act as a committee to advise their separate Departments.

“Professor Kirk asked if the Minister would agree to appoint a representative of the Institute to the committee with Dr. Thomson and Mr. Turner.

“Hon. Mr. Guthrie said that he would have to consult the Minister of Internal Affairs. He thanked the deputation for coming to see him on the matter, and added that if at any time the Institute should desire to make definite recommendations on any points connected with the sanctuaries he would be pleased to receive them.”

The Hon. the Minister of Lands (Mr. Guthrie), under date of 23rd December, 1919, has written asking the Institute to nominate a representative to act on the committee which he proposes to set up to advise the Government on Kapiti Island.

Donation of Partial Set of “Transactions.”—In addition to those institutions to which the Standing Committee has donated sets of Transactions, a partial set has this year been donated to the Tauranga High School.

Resolutions of the Institute.—Recognizing the desirability of arranging and publishing the regulations and resolutions of the Institute in such a manner that they can be referred to easily, the Standing Committee has appointed a sub-committee to deal with the matter. It is desirable that the regulations should be brought up to date, and any resolutions which have the force of regulations should be gazetted. It will be necessary to amend the research-grant regulations to accord with the conditions laid down by the Hon. the Minister on page 536, volume 49. The amendments to the regulations passed in recent years should be incorporated in the general regulations and reprinted in volume 52.

The Library is still in an unsatisfactory state, and the Hon. Librarian has been authorized to formulate and enforce certain rules to be followed by those using the library.

Catalogue of Fishes.—A matter which has been before the Institute year after year is the compilation of a catalogue of the fishes of New Zealand. The Government has now requested the Institute to submit an estimate of the cost, and the Standing Committee has appointed the Hon. G. M. Thomson and Dr. J. Allan Thomson a sub-committee to compile the estimate.

Protection of the Fauna.—With regard to the protection of native birds, it was resolved to ask the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs for an opportunity of seeing the proposals of the Government, with a view to rendering the fullest assistance in the matter before the proposals are laid before Parliament. The Department of Internal Affairs, in reply (11th March, 1919), promised to submit a copy of the Animals Protection Bill to the New Zealand Institute for any remarks that the Board might wish to make. The resolutions passed at the last annual meeting regarding the fauna of Macquarie Island have been sent to the Royal Society of Tasmania and to the Premier of that State.

The New Zealand Institute has now received a letter, dated 29th November, 1919, from the Secretary of the Royal Society of Tasmania, stating that at a recent conference in Brisbane a resolution was passed asking the Government to declare the island a sanctuary. The letter also stated that there was now a movement afoot to obtain a renewal of Mr. Hatch's lease, which had been cancelled by the Tasmanian Government. It was suggested that New Zealand societies might write to the Premier of Tasmania supporting the proposal for a sanctuary at Macquarie Island.

The incorporated societies of the New Zealand Institute have been circularized with regard to the Tasmanian society's request, in order that they may contribute support to the movement.

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International Research Council.—It was resolved to expend up to £25 in payment of the expenses of a delegate from England to a meeting of the above in Brussels. Dr. Dendy was chosen by the Standing Committee to represent the New Zealand Institute at the meeting, and his report has recently been received. He stated that the conference was most interesting, and that, although no question arose of special interest to New Zealand, he hoped that the Dominion might benefit by the organization of scientific research which the Conference was endeavouring to establish.

Resolutions passed at the Canterbury Philosophical Institute's Science Congress, held in February last, were received from the Hon. Secretary, Canterbury Philosophical Institute. The Hon. Secretary, New Zealand Institute, was authorized to remit them to the Departments concerned. The following is a synopsis of the replies:—

(1.) The Hon. the Minister of Agriculture stated that he was largely in agreement with the resolutions. A Pure Seeds Bill had already been drafted, and the preparation of legislation to provide for the purity and standardization of spraying-compounds was under way. The importance of the soil survey was also recognized. Hitherto the difficulty had been one of staff; but it was hoped to arrange this in the near future.

(2.) The Hon. the Minister of Mines replied that an endeavour was being made to secure the services of a suitable officer for the position of Palaeontologist to the Geological Survey.

(3.) The Hon. the Minister of Marine stated that the investigation into climatic winds would be considered as soon as Mr. Bates returned to the Dominion.

(4.) The Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs replied (a) that the provision of a Milne-Shaw seismograph had been approved, and that an order for its purchase was being forwarded to the High Commissioner; (b) that the establishment of an herbarium would receive careful consideration when the necessary accommodation was available.

Collection of New Zealand Coleoptera.—The Standing Committee have approved of certain steps which the Director of the Dominion Museum proposed to take with the object of having a collection of New Zealand Coleoptera retained in the Dominion.

Lord Jellicoe's Visit.—The President (Dr. Cockayne) and Professor Easterfield waited on Admiral Jellicoe on H.M.S. “New Zealand” as a deputation from the New Zealand Institute to tender any information regarding the best body in New Zealand qualified to give scientific advice. The Admiral thanked the members of the deputation for their attendance and advice.

The following is the portion of Lord Jellicoe's report to the New Zealand Governor-General which deals with the organization of scientific research in the Navy:—

“It is very necessary that the fullest use should be made by naval officers of the advances of science.… It is recommended that the Admiralty should be asked to keep the New Zealand Naval Board advised as to the progress made by the Scientific Research and Experiment Department. It is also recommended that an organization on similar lines should be provided in New Zealand when practicable.

“From the existing New Zealand Institute, which has technological sections, and which can undertake investigation in general physical and chemical problems, a nucleus of a Naval Scientific and Research Department could be formed.

“A number of the best scientists should be selected to form the Department under the Presidency of the C.N.S., New Zealand Naval Board. A scientist of wide experience should be appointed as Vice-President.

“In the first instance the work of the scientists of the proposed Scientific Research and Experiment Department … might be carried out at Victoria University College, Wellington.”

Publication of Congress Papers.—The publication of the proceedings, papers, and addresses which constituted the first Science Congress held under the auspices of the New Zealand Institute was arranged as follows:—

(1.) The Christchurch daily papers, in the first place, gave very full, prominent, and accurate reports of the work of the Congress day by day.

(2.) Later, the Journal of Science and Technology devoted two special numbers, issued together (No. 4 and No 5 of volume 2, issued July, 1919), to the publication of those features of the Congress which were suitable for publication in the Journal and which were not reserved for publication in the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute. This is really the best official record of the work of the Congress, being a connected narrative of the proceedings, the title of every paper being given and (where not required for the Transactions) some account of each paper. A number of the shorter papers were printed in full; and, in addition, photos of some of the chief dignitaries of the Congress.

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(3.) Finally, volume 51 of the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, published in September, 1919, has proved a fitting medium for publishing several papers by well-known authorities who desired that course.

It is satisfactory to know that the Hon. G. W. Russell, the late Minister of Internal Affairs, has expressed to the President (Dr. Cockayne) his great appreciation of the manner in which the proceedings of the Science Congress have been printed and published.

Interest on Savings-bank Deposits.—On the motion of Mr. C. A. Ewen, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved, That the accrued interest from deposits in the Savings-bank be allotted to the N.Z. Institute Endowment Fund from time to time.

Hon. Treasurer's Reports.—The Hon. Treasurer moved, and Dr. Allan Thomson seconded, That the Hon. Treasurer's reports—(1) Statement of Receipts and Expenditure for Year ending 31st December, 1919, (2) Statement of Liabilities and Assets as at 31st December, 1919, (3) Statement of Research Grant Fund for Year ending 31st December, 1919, all duly audited by the Auditor-General—be adopted. Carried.

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New Zealand Institute.—Statement of Receipts and Expenditure for the Year ending 31st December, 1919.

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Receipts. £ s. d.
Balance at 31st December, 1918 372 16 4
Savings-bank interest to 31st December, 1919 14 6 8
Government statutory grant 500 0 0
Government special grant for binding 250 0 0
Government extra grant for 1919–20 500 0 0
Publications sold 67 12 3
Affiliated societies' levy, 1919 131 12 0
Government grants for research work 1,790 0 0
Refund by Canterbury Philosophical Institute, part grant made 6th March, 1917 60 0 0
Refund from Public Trustee—Customs duty on Hector Memorial Medals 2 18 4
£3,689 5 7

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Expenditure. £ s. d.
Government Printer—
Printing vol. 50, £547; and papers, £19 6s. 566 6 0
Printing vol. 51, £730; and papers, £61 11s. 6d. 791 11 6
Governors' travelling expenses 32 0 2
Lawson, Sydney—Prints for vol. 51 12 15 0
Secretary's expenses—postage, stationery, and clerical work 34 5 3
Fire-insurance premiums on library 5 0 0
Legal expenses 5 5 0
Bank charge, 5s. and 5s. 0 10 0
Transactions purchased 3 0 0
Expenses Professor Kirk to Kapiti Island 5 1 0
Research grants, as per list 415 7 0
1,871 0 11
By balance, as under 1,818 4 8
£3,689 5 7

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Balance in— £ s. d.
Bank of New Zealand 762 0 0
Post Office Savings-bank 1,056 4 8
£1,818 4 8
Made up as follows:— £ s. d.
Endowment Fund 4 18 1
Balance Government grants for research 1,509 13 0
Institute's general purposes balance 252 7 0
Accrued interest, Post Office Savings-bank 51 6 7
£1,818 4 8

Approved by Auditor-General.

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New Zealand Institute—Statement of Liabilities and Assets at 31st December. 1919.

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Liabilities. £ s. d.
To Hector Memorial Fund 1,057 3 11
Hutton Memorial Fund 856 14 5
Carter Bequest 4,505 11 6
Balance Government grants for research purposes 1,509 13 0
Balance Endowment Fund in Post Office Savings-bank 4 18 1
Balance 317 18 10
£8,251 19 9

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Assets. £ s. d.
By Balances in hands Public Trustee— Hector Memorial Fund 1,057 3 11
Hutton Memorial Fund 856 14 5
Carter Bequest 4,505 11 6
Outstanding accounts 14 5 3
Balance in Bank of New Zealand 762 0 0
Balance in Post Office Savings-bank 1,056 4 8
£8,251 19 9
By Balance £317 18 10

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New Zealand Institute.—Government Research Grants.
Dr. Cr.
1919. £ s. d. £ s. d.
Jan. 1. By Balance on hand 75 0 0
April 3. Government grant 55 0 0
June 26. Government grant 1,500 0 0
Nov. 21. Government grant 185 0 0
Oct. 22. Government grant 50 0 0
Feb. 6. To Grant to L. J. Wild 30 0 0
Feb. 28. Grant to Professor Jack 25 0 0
May 5. Grant to Dr. C. E. Adams 55 0 0
Aug. 11. Grant to Professor John Malcolm 25 0 0
Sept. 11. Grant to Professor T. H. Easterfield 15 0 0
Sept. 20. Grant to Professor John Malcolm 25 0 0
Oct. 29. Grant to R. Speight 50 0 0
Nov. 14. Grant to W. G. Morrison 30 0 0
Nov. 20. Grant to G. Brittin 20 0 0
Nov. 20. Grant to Professor John Malcolm 35 0 0
Nov. 25. Grant to Professor T. H. Easterfield 15 0 0
Nov. 28. Grant to G. Howes 30 0 0
Dec. 5. Grant to Professor John Malcolm 35 0 0
Oct. 15. By Refund by Canterbury Philosophical Institute, part grant made 9th March, 1919 60 0 0
Dec. 19. To Grants to Dr. J. Allan Thomson 25 7 0
415 7 0
Balance on hand 1,509 13 0
£1,925 0 0 £1,925 0 0

Clerical Work of the Institute.—The Board went into Committee to consider the proposal to appoint a permanent paid official to assist the honorary officers of the Institute. After some discussion it was resolved, on the motion of the Hon. Secretary, seconded by Dr. J. Allan Thomson, That authority be given to the Standing Committee to engage a paid whole-time official to assist the honorary officers of the Institute, at a salary not exceeding £200 per annum.

Fellowship: Method of Election.—On the motion of Professor Chilton, seconded by Mr. Hill, it was resolved, That a committee consisting of the President, Professor Segar, Mr. Ewen, and Mr. Hogben be appointed to draw up rules for the election of Fellows of the Institute, and to report to the Standing Committee.

Catalogue of New Zealand Fishes.—The Hon. G. M. Thomson stated that he had gone into the subject of producing a catalogue of New Zealand

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fishes, and estimated that it would cost at least £1,725. On his motion, seconded by Professor Kirk, it was resolved, That this meeting of the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute re-urges upon the Government the necessity of preparing and publishing an illustrated catalogue of New Zealand fishes as a work of national importance, and that this work should be undertaken at as early a date as possible.

International Research Council.—The action of the Standing Committee in arranging for a delegate (Professor Dendy) to represent New Zealand at the International Research Conference at Brussels was approved. Dr. J Allan Thomson summarized the published reports of the Conference. On the motion of Dr. Thomson, seconded by Professor Chilton, it was resolved, That the following resolution of the International Research Council be referred to the Government for favourable consideration:—

“Considérant que les pertes résultant de la guerre ne pourront ětre pleinement réparées que par le travail dirigé de plus en plus dans la voie de la technique fécondée elle-měme par de nouvelles découvertes scientifiques; considérant que l'œuvre humanitaire et sociale ainsi dévolue à la science a besoin d'ětre largement outillée et subventionée: La Conférence émet le voeu de voir les Gouvernements, représentés dans la Société des Nations, s'entendre pour constituer un budget international des sciences et contribuer ainsi aux travaux des Associations internationales.”

Financial Position of the Institute.—The financial position of the Institute was discussed at length. The President explained that a deputation had waited upon the Hon. J. B. Hine recently, and had secured an additional £500 towards the general expenses of the Institute. On the motion of Mr. Ewen, seconded by Mr. Hill, it was resolved, That for every copy of volume 52 of the Transactions received by the incorporated societies a contribution of 2s. 6d. towards the cost of printing shall be made during the current year by such society.

On the motion of the Hon. G. M. Thomson, seconded by Dr. P. Marshall, it was resolved, That this meeting of the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute urges on the Government the necessity of amending section 10 of the New Zealand Institute Act by deleting the words “five hundred pounds” and substituting the words “one thousand pounds,” in accordance with a definite promise made by a Minister of Internal Affairs, and in view of the fact that a supplementary sum of £500 was paid during 1919 pending the alteration of the Act.

The Public Trustee's Reports on the Carter Bequest, the Hutton Memorial Fund, and the Hector Memorial Fund for the year ending 31st December, 1919, were adopted.

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Hutton Memorial Research Fund.—Statement of Account for the Year ending 31st December, 1919.
Dr. Cr.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
By Balance 826 6 11
Public Trust Office—
Interest to 31st December, 1919, at £ s. d.
4½ per cent. 36 15 11
Bonus interest to 31st March, 1919 3 11 7
40 7 6
To New Zealand Institute Account—Grant to Miss Mestayer for research work 10 0 0
Balance 856 14 5
£866 14 5 £866 14 5
By Balance £856 14 5
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Hector Memorical Fund.—Statement of Account for the Year ending 31st December, 1919.
Dr. Cr.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
By Balance 1,067 19 9
Public Trust Office—
Interest to 31st December, 1919, at £ s. d.
4½ per cent. 45 14 5
Bonus interest to 31st March, 1919 4 11 7
50 6 0
To New Zealand Institute Account—
Dr. P. W. Robertson—Hector Prize for 1919 45 0 0
Allan G. Wyon—Twelve bronze Hector Medals 13 2 6
C. A. Ewen—Duty on medals 2 18 4
61 0 10
Public Trust Office: Petty expenses—
Exchange. 0 1 0
Balance 1,057 3 11
£1,118 5 9 £1,118 5 9
By Balance £1,057 3 11

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Carter Bequest.—Statement of Account for the Year ending 31st December. 1919.
Dr. Cr.
Residuary Account. £ s. d. £ s. d.
By Balance 4,342 5 4
Public Trust Office—
Interest to 31st December, 1919, at £ s. d.
4½ per cent. 195 3 9
Bonus interest to 31st March, 1919 18 2 5
213 6 2
To Balance 4,555 11 6
£4,555 11 6 £4,555 11 6
By Balance £4,555 11 6
Assets. £ s. d.
Balance as per account 4,555 11 6
Liabilities. £ s. d.
Legacy—Museum and New Zealand Institute 50 0 0
Balance Public Trustee's commission At scale rates.

Hutton Research Grant Fund.—A report from Miss Mestayer regarding the grant of £10 towards work on the New Zealand Mollusca was received. There were no applications for further grants.

Hutton Award Committee.—The President then opened the sealed recommendation of the Hutton Award Committee, which proposed that the award should be made this year to the Rev. J. E. Holloway, D.Sc. Professor Charles Chilton moved, and the Hon. G. M. Thomson seconded, That the report be adopted. Carried.

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Report of the Hutton Memorial Award Committee.

The Committee of Award unanimously recommend that the medal for 1920 be awarded to Rev. John E. Holloway, D.Sc.

The Committee have reviewed the claims of other biologists and geologists, but have been so impressed by the brilliant work of Dr. Holloway, by his patience and enthusiasm in his search for material, by his keenness of observation, and by the highly important results obtained in his researches on the life-histories of the Lycopodiaceae, as well as that on the embyrology of Tmesipteris—botanical studies of outstanding merit and of far-reaching interest—that they place his work on a higher plane than that of other men whose publications may nevertheless be more numerous.

W. B. Benham,.


Convener.

Hector Award Committee.—The President also opened the sealed recommendation of the Hector Award Committee, which proposed that the award should be made this year to Mr. S. Percy Smith, for ethnology. Mr. H. Hill moved, and Professor Thomas seconded, the adoption of the report. Carried.

Report of Hector Memorial Award Committee.

All members of the Hector Award Committee—Messrs. Spencer, Cheeseman, Thomson, and myself—agree that the award of the medal for ethnology should be made to Mr. S. Percy Smith. This conclusion is based, on his remarkable services to science, as shown in his voluminous writings and his conducting of the Journal of the Polynesian Society since 1892.

Elsdon Best..

Publication Committee's Report.—The report of the Publication Committee was adopted on the motion of Dr. Marshall, seconded by Professor Chilton, and it was also resolved, That the Committee be recommended to proceed as soon as possible with the publication of Mr. Dixon's papers. on mosses.

Report of Publication Committee.

Forty papers were accepted for publication in volume 51 of the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, and the volume was issued on the 1st September, 1919. It is of average size, and contains xviii plus 548 pages (of which 89 are devoted to the Proceedings and Appendix), 33 plates (one coloured), and a large number of text-figures. No date appears now on the title-page but the actual date of publication (1919 in this case), and the words “for the year 1918” appearing at one place on the cover are due to an oversight in proof-reading.

No bulletins have been issued during the year.

For the Committee.

C. A. Cotton,


Hon. Editor.

Hon. Librarian's Report.—The Hon. Librarian read his report, and moved, That the report be adopted. The motion was seconded by Mr. Hill and carried.

Report of the Library Committee.

The incoming exchanges have been received, registered, and placed upon the shelves. A list of those received for 1918 was prepared by a member of the committee and printed in the Appendix of the Proceedings, pp. 536–39. Owing to the suspension of the Smithsonian International Exchange, a number of important American publications were not received during 1918 and 1919, but these are now beginning to come to hand.

A few sample volumes have been bound, but the quotations received were so discouraging as regards price that no further action has been taken in regard to the expenditure of the £250 voted for this purpose by the Government.

Information has recently been received from the Director of the International Catalogue of Scientific Literature that the publications mentioned in the report of this committee for 1918 have now been noted for inclusion in the International Catalogue. Before this letter came to hand, however, a letter from the Secretary of the Royal Society was received, pointing out the difficulties in carrying out the further publication of the catalogue, and asking for the consideration of the position by the New Zealand Institute as the Regional Bureau for New Zealand.

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The International Catalogue originated at a conference summoned by the Royal Society in 1896, and the finance of the undertaking was secured by a loan of £7,500 advanced by the Royal Society. Germany formally withdrew from the convention in 1914, and the Royal Society undertook the direct control during the crisis. The aggregate net loss for the first eleven years of issue is £2,556 2s. 1d. A sum of £8,500 was raised to relieve the Royal Society from the heavy liabilities they had incurred down to the 14th issue.

It seems clear that the catalogue, in its present form, cannot be self-supporting. It can only be continued with the assistance of a permanent endowment or of external subscriptions towards the expenses of the Central Bureau. The Royal Society will not be able again to undertake responsibility for the whole catalogue. Failing this, it is recommended that the form of the catalogue should be simplified by the omission of the subject indexes, and should consist simply of a quinquennial authors' list for each science, the Central Bureau to co-operate with any organizations dealing with a single subject, such as that at present responsible for Science Abstracts.

In the opinion of your committee the catalogue could have little value in such a form, and the question for the Board of Governors to decide is whether the International Catalogue is of sufficient value to warrant an annual contribution by way of endowment. This can only be done, under present conditions, by a Government grant ad hoc.

J. Allan Thomson,


Hon. Librarian.

Research Grant Committee's Report.—The Hon. Secretary read some additions to the Research Grant Committee's report already circulated, and moved. That the report be adopted. The motion was seconded by Professor Thomas, and carried.

Report of Research Grant Committee.
(Professor Easterfield, Mr. F. W. Furkert, and Mr. B. C. Aston.)

(For previous reports see Trans. N.Z. Inst., vol. 50, p. 333, and vol. 51, p. 462.)

Mr. L. P. Symes, who was in 1916 granted £50 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for investigating the decay of apples and other fruits in cold storage, reported that for health reasons, as well as pressure of business, he was unable to take up the investigation. On the 11th October, 1919, he therefore refunded the sum of £50.

°Mr. L. Birks, to whom £10 had been granted in 1916 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for investigating the electrical prevention of frosts in orchards, was by reason of his transfer to Wellington unable to continue the experiments. Therefore, on the 11th October, 1919, he refunded the grant of £10.

Messrs. R. Speight and L. J. Wild, to whom £50 was granted in 1916 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for the investigation of the phosphatic limestones of Canterbury, reported on the 19th December, 1919, that in the beginning of the year they examined the limestone country at Mount Somers and in the Rangitata Valley, and also the chalk at Oxford, with the object of finding phosphate. The results obtained were almost entirely negative. This work necessitated the expenditure of about £7, leaving a balance of about the same sum of the original grant. Owing to the restrictions on travelling in the middle of the year (and other causes) it was found impossible to carry on the work; but the grantees would be glad to receive permission to expend the balance on further investigation, especially in the Mount Somers district.

Professor R. Jack, to whom £25 was granted in 1917 (through the Otago Institute) for investigating the electrical charge on rain, reported on the 1st January that owing to pressure of University work he had been unable to utilize the grant. As this year Professor Jack expects to have further assistance, and a graduate prepared to undertake the work under his direction, he hopes that the New Zealand Institute will grant a further extension for a year.

Professor C. Chilton, to whom £50 was granted in 1918 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for investigating New Zealand flax (phormium), reported on the 27th December, 1919, that it had been impossible to do much since the last reports had been submitted. Mrs. Jennings (now Dr. Bella D. MacCallum) had made the preliminary investigations; but early in 1919 she had to leave for England. At Cambridge University Dr. MacCallum has qualified still further for the investigations necessary, and it is hoped that before long she will return to the Dominion and resume work on the New Zealand flax. Out of the grant of £50 a balance of £39 is still unexpended.

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Professor J. Malcolm, to whom £30 was granted in 1918 (through the Otago Institute) for research in New Zealand plant poisons, reported on the 17th December, 1919, that there was still about £14 13s. of the grant in hand. The research on pukateine was continued during the vacation, but pressure of teaching-work had prevented the completion of a paper begun on the subject. Professor Malcolm would like to have the final report postponed until December, 1920.

Professor W. P. Evans, to whom £200 was granted in 1918 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for investigating New Zealand brown coals, reported on the 22nd December, 1919, that the fractionating column—mentioned in his previous report—had at last come to hand. As it was more likely to be of general use in the laboratory than for the special purpose of this research, it had been paid for entirely out of laboratory funds. Analyses and experiments had been made in connection with (1) Avoca coal, (2) Homebush coal, (3) Mount Somers coal, (4) Mossbank coal. Of the £200 grant a balance of £10 6s. 2d. remains unexpended. Professor Evans desires a further grant of £200 to continue the investigations in 1920.

Mr. Guy Brittin, to whom £100 was granted in 1919 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for research in fruit-tree diseases, reported on the 16th December, 1919, that the general work had been proceeding. This consisted of special pruning and spraying, and noting the effects. The microscopical investigations had been delayed by the difficulty of procuring the requisite apparatus; but owing to the kindness of Professor Kirk he had obtained the loan of a Cathcart microtome, which enabled him to prepare sections of some of the later stages of the diseases being investigated. At the time of reporting only £1 12s. had been expended.

Professor C. C. Farr, to whom £100 was granted in 1919 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for experiments on the porosity of insulators, reported on the 7th January, 1920, that the whole of this grant had been expended in the construction of a testing-vessel, which cost £95, and its fittings. Investigations will commence immediately Professor Farr returns from Australia.

Mr. W. G. Morrison, who in 1919 was granted £70 to £100 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for research in the natural regeneration of exotic and indigenous forest-trees in connection with natural afforestation of high country, reported in December, 1919, that a certain amount of useful data had been collected, and many interesting photographs taken. This information would be used in connection with a paper to be read before the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury. The amount so far expended was £13 18s. 3d Mr. Morrison asks for a continuance of the grant.

Mr. G. S. Thomson and Hon. G. M. Thomson, who in 1919 were granted £50 (through the Otago Institute) for a research into the economic value of whale-feed, reported on the 3rd December, 1919, that the apparatus ordered from England had not come to hand, and, owing to adverse weather conditions, there had been almost no opportunities for collecting. It is desired that the grant be renewed for another year.

Professor J. Malcolm, to whom £250 was granted in 1919 (through the Otago Institute) for a research on New Zealand fishes, reported on the 17th December, 1919, that he had secured the services of a research worker and carried out the anaylses of several of the common food-fishes, including groper, kingfish, moki, blue cod, &c. A paper entitled “Food Value of New Zealand Fishes, Part I,” had been forwarded to the Hon. Editor. £115 had been expended, and a liability to the extent of £25 had been incurred for apparatus. It is hoped that another grant will be made to enable the work to be continued.

Mr. R. Speight, to whom £225 was granted in 1919 (through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury) for a geological survey of Malvern Hills, reported on the 19th December, 1919, that owing to the lateness of receipt of the money no expenditure had yet been made. Mr. Speight devoted all the time he could to the preparation of a report on the coal-measures at Broken River—an investigation which has some bearing on the problems to be considered at Malvern—and was submitting a paper on the geological features of these beds. Work on the research for which the grant was specially given would, however, be commenced forthwith.

Messrs. Lancaster and Cornes, to whom £50 was granted in October, 1919 (through the Auckland Institute), for forestry research; expect to commence work early in 1920.

Dr. C. E. Adams, to whom £35 was granted in 1919 (through the Wellington Philosophical Society) for astronomical research, reported on the 5th January, 1920, that the total amount of the grant had been remitted to the British Astronomical Association, London, for the purchase of apparatus. A transit micrometer is on the way to Wellington, and as soon as this instrument is in operation a further report will be made.

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Dr. C. E. Adams, to whom £150 was granted (through the Wellington Philosophical Society) for research in connection with astronomical sites, reported on the 14th January, 1920, that a programme of test observations was being arranged, and would be available for use in the field in May, 1920, when it was proposed to begin in the South Island at about 45° S. latitude.

Professor H. B. Kirk, to whom £25 was granted in 1917 (through the Wellington Philosophical Society) for investigating methods of killing mosquitoes and larvae, reported on the 3rd January, 1920, that the whole of the grant had been expended. The experiments made confirmed the view expressed in the previous report that the cresoles in the pure state are not very effective, and that neither they nor the phenols are so effective as a mixture of all together. During 1919 he obtained no positive results of equal value with those he had already obtained—that is, that he had found no larvicide of equal efficiency with light oil. Experiments had also been made with tangle-foot mixtures.

Professor T. H. Easterfield, to whom £250 was granted in 1919 (through the Wellington Philosophical Society), reported that the investigation on mineral oils, waxes, and resins has been proceeding steadily since July last, and the first instalment of the investigation will be ready for publication by May next. Of the sum of £250 granted for the research, £98 19s. has been expended (almost entirely on the salaries of assistants), leaving a balance of £151 1s.

Dr. J. Allan Thomson, to whom £100 was granted in 1919 (through the Wellington Philosophical Society) for a research into the chemical characters of igneous rocks, reported on the 28th January, 1920, that the work could not be begun until November, 1919, owing to the delay in arrival of the necessary literature from America. Since then Dr. Allan Thomson has had University students at work tabulating and plotting rock-analyses. So far (January, 1920) £53 12s. 6d. had been expended.

Thomas H. Easterfield..


F. C. Furkert..


B. C. Aston..

Professor Kirk explained that the item of expenditure, “Professor Kirk, travelling-expenses to Kapiti Island, £5 1s.,” referred to the expenses of Mr. Bendall as well as his own.

Mr. Hill asked whether the Colenso botanical collection was being well cared for, and the President assured him that it was.

Correspondence: Resolutions of Science Congress.—The replies from Government Departments to the resolutions passed at the Science Congress, 1919, were read by the Hon. Secretary. On the motion of Professor Kirk, it was resolved, That the matter be referred to the Standing Committee to take whatever action may be necessary in following up these resolutions.

National Efficiency, Board's Report.—A letter, dated 14th March, 1919, from the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs was read. The letter stated that the Government could not at that time see its way to adopt the report of the National Efficiency Board, but had given instructions for the compilation of an annual census of industries. On the motion of Professor Easterfield, seconded by Mr. Hill, it was resolved, That the Minister of Internal Affairs be approached by a deputation urging that effect be given to the resolutions of the National Efficiency Board.

Proposed Contour Map.—A letter of the 20th August, 1919, from the Wellington Philosophical Society, urging the preparation of a contoured topographical map, was read. On the motion of Dr. J. Allan Thomson, seconded by Mr. Hill, it was resolved, That in the opinion of the New Zealand Institute the preparation of a contoured topographical map of New Zealand, on as large a scale as practicable (say, 1:25,000), is now an imperative necessity, as the map is required for agricultural, geological, and geographical purposes.

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Carter Bequest.—Letters of the 17th March, 1919, and the 23rd April, 1919, from the Wellington Philosophical Society, were read. On the motion of Professor Kirk, seconded by Mr. Wright, it was resolved, That the New Zealand Institute will view with satisfaction vigorous steps in the direction of developing the Carter Fund to the point at which the wishes of the benefactor can be carried into effect.

Science Congress, 1921.—The President urged the importance of holding this Congress, and the suitability of Palmerston North for the meeting. He also invited Mr. Park (delegate from Palmerston North) to address the Board on this subject.

Mr. Park stated that preliminary steps for holding the Congress had already been taken, and various local bodies had been approached. All were taking up the matter enthusiastically, and a number of the best men had been appointed to carry out the project. They hoped to arrange a few local tours for the visitors to the Congress.

On the motion of Dr. Cockayne, seconded by Professor Easterfield, it was resolved, That in confirmation of the action of the Standing Committee the Board of Governors accepts the invitation of the Manawatu Philosophical Society to hold the 1921 Science Congress at Palmerston North.

The question of fixing a date was discussed, and Mr. Park pointed out that an endeavour was being made to avoid clashing with the fixtures of the Australian societies.

On the motion of Professor Easterfield, seconded by Professor Thomas, it was resolved, That the Standing Committee be authorized to act with the Manawatu Society in making all arrangements in connection with the Palmerston meeting, and to co-opt such additional members as they deem desirable.

International Catalogue of Scientific Literature.—With regard to the letter of the 25th June, 1919, from the Royal Society, the President stated that the letter had already been circulated among the Governors, and drew attention to the fact that the catalogue was very little used. After some discussion it was resolved, on the motion of Dr. J. Allan Thomson, seconded by Professor Kirk, That a letter be written to the Secretary of the Royal Society expressing the view of the New Zealand Institute that the International Catalogue of Scientific Literature would be of little value without the subject index. If this is retained, the New Zealand Institute will urge on the Government of New Zealand to subsidize a subscription for three further copies of the catalogue for the incorporated societies of the Institute.

Resignation of Hon. Editor.—The President read a letter (dated the 5th November, 1919) from Dr. C. A. Cotton, resigning his position as Honorary Editor, and expressed his appreciation of the admirable way in which Dr. Cotton had performed the duties of Editor. On the motion of Professor Chilton, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved, That Dr. Cotton's resignation be accepted with great regret, and that the thanks of the Board be conveyed to him for the excellent services he had rendered as Hon. Editor.

Proposed New Regulations of the Institute.—A letter of the 28th March, 1919, from the Wellington Philosophical Society, was read, bringing before the notice of the Institute a suggestion to amend clause 6 of the Fellowship Regulations by deleting the words “is a British subject and.” A motion to this effect was moved by Professor Kirk, and seconded by Professor Easterfield, but the motion was lost.

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Kapiti Island.—A letter of the 23rd December, 1919, from the Hon. the Minister of Lands, was read, stating that steps were being taken to set up a committee to advise the Government on Kapiti Island, and asking the Institute to nominate a representative to act on the committee. It was resolved, on the motion of Dr. Cockayne, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, That Professor Kirk be appointed the Institute's representative on this committee.

On the motion of Professor Kirk, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved, That the Government be again urged to take prompt action in extinguishing the remaining Native titles on Kapiti Island, and in putting an end to the damage being done by sheep.

Indexing “Transactions.”—A letter of the 20th December, 1919, from the Canterbury Philosophical Institute, was read. The letter asked what steps had been taken with regard to indexing volumes 41 to 50. It was decided that the matter be left to the Standing Committee, to be kept steadily in view for action when the facilities were available.

Samoan Geophysical Observatory.—The Hon. Secretary read a letter from Professor Farr, urging the importance of this observatory, and the necessity for compensating Dr. Anghenheister for the expense of maintaining it during the war. Dr. Adams, Government Astronomer, attended, and gave the Board first-hand information obtained during his recent visit to Samoa.

On the motion of Mr. Wright, seconded by Dr. Marshall, it was resolved, That, in view of the great importance of the Samoan geophysical observatory, a committee consisting of the President-elect, Professor Farr, Professor Marsden, Professor Somerville, and Mr. G. Hogben be set up to confer with the Government Astronomer and the Minister of External Affairs as to the best means to be adopted for the maintenance of the Samoan Observatory.

Macquarie Island.—A report dated the 13th January, 1919, was received from Mr. H. Hamilton, dealing with the preservation of the fauna of Macquarie Island. It was resolved, That Mr. Hamilton be thanked for his kindness in preparing the report. On the motion of Dr. Marshall, seconded by Mr. Aston, it was further resolved, That the New Zealand Institute would welcome action by the Tasmanian Government in the direction of declaring Macquarie Island a sanctuary for animals and plants.

Hamilton Prize.—A letter of the 17th January, 1920, from the Wellington Philosophical Society, was read, offering to hand over the balance of the Hamilton Fund on certain conditions. Professor Easterfield stated that the Wellington Society had consulted the relatives of the late Mr. Hamilton, and that they were in sympathy with the money being devoted to a prize for encouraging beginners in scientific research. On the motion of Dr. Cockayne, seconded by Dr. Thomson, it was resolved, That the offer be accepted, and the matter be left in the hands of the Standing Committee to meet the Wellington Philosophical Society and draw up rules for the Hamilton Prize.

New Zealand Flax.—On the motion of Professor Kirk, seconded by Dr. Cockayne, it was resolved, That the Government be urged to take effective steps to investigate the cause and treatment of “yellow-leaf” and accompanying diseases in New Zealand flax, and advised that this

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can best be done by such liberal treatment of the Cawthron Institute as would enable it to bring to New Zealand the best available plant-pathologist, who should devote his time to this subject for as many years as might be necessary.

Dominion Museum.—It was moved by Professor Easterfield, seconded by Dr. Marshall, and carried, That the attention of Cabinet be drawn to the urgency of the need of a new and fireproof museum to accommodate the valuable scientific collections at present housed in the old wooden building in Museum Street.

Forestry Matters.—On the motion of Professor Kirk, seconded by Professor Chilton, it was resolved, That the Institute convey to the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs its congratulations on the formulating of a definite forest policy.

Sir David Hutchins.—It was resolved, on the motion of the President, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, That the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute extends to Sir David Hutchins its congratulations on the honour recently conferred on him by His Majesty the King.

Election of Hon. Members.—The nominations for honorary membership were then considered. Professor Easterfield and Professor Segar were appointed scrutineers. The voting resulted in the election of Sir J. G. Frazer, D.C.L.; Professor J. W. Gregory, D.Sc., F.R.S.; Sir A. D. Hall, M.A., K.C.B., F.R.S.; Sir Douglas Mawson, B.E., D.Sc.; Mr. Henry Woods, M.A., F.R.S., F.G.S.

Travelling-expenses.—It was moved by Professor Kirk, seconded by Dr. Marshall, and carried, That the travelling-expenses of members of the Board be paid.

Election of Officers.—The officers for the year 1920 were unanimously elected as follows: President, Professor T. H. Easterfield; Hon. Editor, Mr. Johannes C. Andersen; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. C. A. Ewen; Hon. Librarian, Dr. J. Allan Thomson; Hon. Secretary, Mr. B. C. Aston.

Election of Committees.—Publication Committee: Professor Kirk, Dr. Cotton, Mr. Johannes C. Andersen; Dr. J. Allan Thomson and Mr. Aston.

Library Committee: Professor Somerville, Dr. J. Allan Thomson, and Dr. Cotton.

Research Grants Committee: Dr. J. Allan Thomson, Mr. Furkett, and Mr. Aston.

Hector Award Committee: Dr. Marshall (convener), Mr. T. F. Cheeseman, Dr. Chilton, Professor Easterfield, and Dr. Cockayne.

Hutton Award Committee.—Dr. Benham (convener), Dr. Marshall, Rev. Dr. Holloway, and Dr. Cockayne.

Regulations Committee: Mr. Johannes C. Andersen, Dr. J. Allan Thomson, Mr. Ewen, and Mr. Aston.

Date and Place of Next Annual Meeting.—It was moved by Dr. Chilton, seconded by Mr. Hill, and carried, That the date and place of the next annual meeting be left in the hands of the Standing Committee to arrange, in conjunction with the Manawatu Philosophical Society.

Mr. M. A. Eliott.—On the motion of Professor Easterfield, seconded by Professor Thomas, it was resolved, That the Board of Governors hears with regret of the serious illness of Mr. M. A. Eliott, and trusts that he will have a speedy recovery.

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Votes of Thanks were accorded to—(1) The Hon. G. W. Russell, for assistance rendered to the Institute during his term of office as Minister of Internal Affairs; (2) the honorary officers of the Institute, for their services during the past year; and (3) to the Standing Committee, for services rendered during the year.

Authority to confirm the minutes of the annual meeting was granted to the Standing Committee.

Resolutions of Sympathy.—That the most hearty sympathy of the Board be accorded the relatives of Professor Maclaurin, late President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

That the most hearty sympathy of the Board be accorded the relatives of the late Dr. Etheridge, Director of the Australian Museum.