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Volume 52, 1920
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Otago Institute.

At the annual meeting (9th December, 1919) the annual report and audited balance-sheet were adopted.

Abstract.

Seven meetings of the Institute were held. At these meetings the following papers were read, and have since been forwarded to the New Zealand Institute for publication in the Transactions: D. L. Poppelwell, “Notes on the Indigenous Vegetation of Ben Lomond, with a List of Species,” and “Notes on the Indigenous Vegetation of the Northeastern Portion of the Hokonui Hills, with a List of Species”; Professor J. Park, “On the Occurrence of Striated Boulders in a Palaeozoic Breccia near Taieri Mouth”; A. Philpott, “Notes and Descriptions of New Zealand Lepidoptera”; Charles E. Clarke, “New Lepidoptera,” and “Lepidoptera of Auckland and King-country”; H. Beattie (communicated by H. D. Skinner), “The Southern Maoris and Greenstone,” and “Native Lore of the Southern Maoris”; Dorothy Johnson, B.Sc. (communicated by J, Malcolm), “Food Value of New Zealand Fish”; M. Winifred Betts, M.Sc., “Notes on the Autecology of certain Plants of the Peridotite Belt, Nelson, Part 1, No. 3,” and “The Rosette Plants of Cass.”

The following addresses were delivered during the session: “Fifty Years' Science Progress in New Zealand” (presidential address), by the Hon. G. M. Thomson; “Some Recent Theories on the Peopling of the Pacific, “by Mr. H. D. Skinner; “Insect-collecting in Australia, “by Mr. W. G. Howes; “Revolutionary Socialism, “by the Ven. Archdeacon Woodthorpe; “Earthquakes, and their Significance, “by Professor W. N. Benson; “The Economics of Power, “by Professor D. B. Waters.

The speakers at the Jubilee conversazione were the President, Mr. Alex. Bathgate, and Sir James Allen.

Librarian's Report.—During the past year the expenditure on the purchase of books has been less than usual. This is partly owing to the fact that the University is now recognizing the need of adding new zoological and botanical works to their library which is housed in the Museum; while the establishment of a lectureship in ethnology has led that institution to build up a library in this subject. As these books are available to members of the Institute, there is the less need of buying books of a purely scientific character: hence more money will be available for binding back numbers of periodicals, &c, some of which, for one reason or another, have been allowed to accumulate. Thus a good many volumes of Nature should now be bound, and so relieve much shelf-room, and a number of volumes of the publications of the Indian Geological Survey, and other works.

The subscription to Science Progress has been resumed; and a new periodical, Botanical Abstracts, has been added to our list.

The Museum has received, as usual, a number of reports of various Government Departments, as well as publications of museums and universities in various countries. These are for the most part of a technical character.

The University Council has agreed to provide the money for the erection of a new set of shelves for the accommodation of the rapidly-increasing collection of ethnographical works. It is hoped that during the coming year a large lecture-room will be erected for the biology class, which will be available for the Institute meetings, so that part of the existing lecture-room, may be utilized for a needed extension of the library.

Membership.—During the year three members have died and eleven have resigned. Six new members were elected, so that the roll now stands at 158, as compared to 166 at the end of last year.

Balance-sheet.—The year's transactions show a debit balance of £6 18s. 7d. This is due to some extra non-recurring items of expenditure—viz., £10 to University Council for installing electric light in the biology lecture-room; £20 to defray part of Dr. Tillyard's travelling-expenses; and the additional expenditure due to the Jubilee celebrations.

Work of the Council

Seven meetings of the Council were held during 1919. In addition to the usual routine work of managing the affairs of the Institute in general, the following items of special business were dealt with:—

Fellowship of the New Zealand Institute.—At the request of the New Zealand Institute, the Council forwarded a list of eighteen nominations for the election of ten original Fellows. Of the eighteen, eight were subsequently elected.

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Research Grants.—In response to the announcement made by the New Zealand Institute that a sum of £2,000 had been allocated by Government for research purposes, three applications were sent in from the Otago members, and were afterwards approved of, viz.—(1) From W. G. Howes, F.E.S., for £30 to defray expenses connected with his work on entomology to be carried out in cooperation with Dr. Tillyard, of Sydney; (2) from G. S. Thomson, B.Sc. for £50 for expenses connected with the study of the composition of “whale-feed”; (3) from Professor J. Malcolm, for £250 for a research into the food value and composition of New Zealand fishes.

Dr. Tillyard's Visit.—Towards the end of last year this Institute, at the suggestion of the Council, invited Dr. Tillyard, of Sydney, to visit this part of New Zealand to investigate some of the local entomology. Owing to shipping difficulties the visit had to be postponed till this year, and Dr. Tillyard is now in the Dominion. The Council has set aside the sum of £20 to defray part of the cost of his visit.

Jubilee of the Institute.—The celebration of the Jubilee took the form of a conversazione in the University. Invitations were sent to the other affiliated societies and to the other scientific bodies in New Zealand and Australia, as well as to prominent men in the Dominion. A large number of congratulatory letters were received. The Council begs to express its thanks to the University Council for granting the use of their buildings and apparatus on this occasion.

Election of Officers for 1920.—President — Dr. R. V. Fulton. Vice-Presidents—Hon. G. M. Thomson, F.L.S., F.N.Z.Inst., M.L.C., and W. G. Howes, F.E.S Hon. Secretary—Professor W. N. Benson, B.A., D.Sc., F.G.S. Hon. Treasurer—H. Brasch. Hon. Librarian—Professor W. B. Benham, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S. Council—Professor W. B. Benham, M.A., D.Sc. F.R.S.; Professor R. Jack, D.Sc.; Professor J. Park, F.G.S.; Professor J. Malcolm, M.D.; Messrs. H. Mandeno, H. D. Skinner, B.A., and G. S. Thomson, B.Sc.

Technological Branch.

At the commencement of the session, the committee of this Branch decided not to attempt a syllabus.

The members were convened for the annual and only meeting on the occasion of a lecture by the Chairman of the Branch (Professor Waters) before the parent Institute, on the 14th October, 1919. The annual meeting was not well supported, and was adjourned till next year.

Astronomical Branch.

The annual meeting, on the 9th December, was the only meeting held, Mr. R. Gilkison, Chairman of the Branch, in the chair. The Branch is looking forward to a reawakening of interest in its special subject now that the war is over, and the following office-bearers for 1920 were elected: Chairman, Mr. R. Gilkison; Vice-Chairmen—Professor Jack, Professor Park, and Professor White; Committee—Rev. D. Dutton, F.R.A.S., Dr. P. D. Cameron, Messrs. H. Brasch and C. Frye; Hon. Secretary—Mr. J. C. Begg.