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Volume 55, 1924
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29Th January, 1924.

The annual meeting of the Board of Governors was held in Victoria University College, Wellington, on Tuesday, 29th January, 1924, at 10 a.m.

Present—

  • President, Professor H. B. Kirk (in the chair), and the following Governors:—

  • Representing the Government: Dr. Chas. Chilton, Dr. L. Cockayne, Dr. J. Allan Thomson, and Mr. B. C. Aston (Hon. Secretary).

  • Representing Wellington Philosophical Society: Mr. G. V. Hudson and Mr. P. G. Morgan.

  • Representing Auckland Institute: Professors H. W. Segar and F. P. Worley.

  • Representing Philosophical Institute of Canterbury: Dr. C. Coleridge Farr and Mr. A. M. Wright.

  • Representing Otago Institute: Hon. G. M. Thomson and Dr. J. Malcolm.

  • Representing Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute: Mr. H. Hill.

  • Representing Manawatu Philosophical Society: Mr. M. A. Eliott (Hon. Treasurer).

  • Representing Wanganui Philosophical Society: Dr. P. Marshall.

  • Representing Nelson Institute: Professor T. H. Easterfield.

Apologies for non-attendance were received from His Excellency the Governor-General and from the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs.

Presidential Address.—Professor Kirk then read his presidential address. It was unanimously resolved to print the address, and a vote of thanks was carried by acclamation.

Resolution of Sympathy.—On the motion of the President, the members stood while honour was done to the memory of those members of the Institute who had died during the past year—namely, Professor F. D. Brown, Mr. T. F. Cheeseman, Mr. R. Murdoch, and Mr. W. F. Worley; and Dr. Bayley Balfour, Honorary Member of the Institute; also Dr. Omori, the eminent Japanese seismologist.

Incorporated Societies' Reports.—The reports and balance-sheets of the following societies were laid on the table: Auckland Institute, for year ending 22nd February, 1923; Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, for year ending 31st October, 1923; Otago Institute, for year ending 30th November, 1923; Hawke's Bay Institute, for year ending 31st December, 1923; Manawatu Philosophical Society, for year ending 14th December, 1923; Nelson Institute, for year ending March, 1923; Wellington Philosophical Society (balance-sheet only), for year ending 30th September, 1923. No report was received from Wanganui Philosophical Society.

Poverty Bay Society.—A letter, dated 19th January, 1924, from the Venerable Archdeacon Williams, was read, intimating that there was no

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hope of resuscitating the Poverty Bay Institute. On the motion of the President, it was resolved, That the Poverty Bay Institute henceforth ceases to be incorporated with the New Zealand Institute.

Standing Committee's Report.—This was received.

Report of the Standing Committee for the Year Ending 31St December, 1923.

Meetings.—During the year nine meetings of the Standing Committee have been held, the attendance being as follows: Professor Kirk, 9; Professor Cotton, 5; Dr. Cockayne, 5; Dr. Marshall, 5; Dr. Marsden, 3; Mr. A. M. Wright, 2; Hon. Mr. Thomson, 1; Mr. M. A. Eliott, 1; Mr. B. C. Aston, 9.

Hector Award.—The award for 1922 was made to Mr. G. V. Hudson, F.N.Z.Inst., for his long-continued and valuable researches in New Zealand entomology.

Hutton Award.—The award for 1922 was made to Dr. J. Allan Thomson, on account of his geological work in New Zealand; of his valuable report on the Brachiopoda of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, involving geographical distribution of recent and final representation; and, further, on account of his morphological work in Recent and extinct Brachiopoda, which sheds a new light on the relations of various genera.

Hamilton Prize.—This was the first year of awarding the Hamilton Memorial Prize, and the committee of award recommended that it be given to Mr. J. G. Myers, of Wellington.

Presentation of Hector, Hutton, and Hamilton Awards.—At a general meeting of the Wellington Philosophical Society held on Friday, 6th July, 1923, opportunity was taken to present the above three awards, the recipients in each case being members of the society. Professor Kirk, President of the New Zealand Institute, presented the Hector Medal to Mr. G. V. Hudson, the Hutton Medal to Dr. J. Allan Thomson, and the Hamilton Prize to Mr. J. G. Myers.

Publications.—Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, volume 54: There has been a considerable delay in the publication of this volume, explained by the Hon. Editor in his report.

Dixon's Bulletin of Mosses: This work is in the press, and should be issued shortly. A delay occurred owing to one of the plates being mislaid in the Printing Office, and another one having to be prepared in England.

Major Broun's Bulletin, part 8 (the final part of this bulletin), was published during the year, and is now available for those who desire it at 3s. 6d. per copy to members and 5s. to non-members.

Exchange List.—During the year the following additions have been made to the exchange list:—

  • Deutsches Entomologisches Museum, Berlin.

  • Astronomical Society of the Pacific, San Francisco.

  • Staatlisches Forschingsenstitut für Volkerkunde, Leipzig.

  • New York State College of Agriculture.

  • Biological Station, Sarator, Russia.

  • Hungarian National Museum, Budapest.

  • Royal Survey of Western Australia.

  • Laboratorio di Zoologia Generale e Agraria, Portici.

  • University of Washington, U.S.A.

  • Ethnological Institute, Tubingen.

  • Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, U.S.A.

  • Staats und Universitatsbibliothek, Hamburg.

  • Musee d'Histoire Naturelle, Genève.

Sales.—A number of sets of Maori Art have been disposed of, and the revenue of the Carter Bequest has been increased by the sale of certain books written by the deceased.

Incorporated Societies' Annual Reports and Balance-sheets.—These were submitted to the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. Eliott, for his report on them. Mr. Eliott prepared a schedule showing the financial state of all the societies, excepting Poverty Bay Institute, which did not supply a balance-sheet or report, and suggested that a copy of the schedule should be sent to each society, enabling each one to see how the other societies were progressing, and possibly thereby create a healthy spirit of emulation. This suggestion was approved by the Standing Committee and carried out.

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Reports have been received from the following societies, and are now laid on the table:—

  • Auckland Institute, for year ending 22nd February, 1923.

  • Wellington Philosophical Society, for year ending 30th September, 1923 (balance-sheet only).

  • Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, for year ending 31st October, 1923.

  • Otago Institute, for year ending 30th November, 1923.

  • Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute, for year ending 31st December, 1923.

  • Manawatu Philosophical Society, for year ending 14th December, 1923.

  • Nelson Institute, for year ending March, 1923.

Fellowship, New Zealand Institute.—On the 15th February, 1923, the appointment of Mr. J. C. Andersen and the Ven. Archdeacon Williams to the Fellowship of the New Zealand Institute was gazetted.

On the 7th April the incorporated societies were asked to send in nominations for the two vacancies in the Fellowship for 1924, and in response thirteen names were forwarded. These were submitted on the 2nd August to the Fellows for selection, and on the 3rd October the Hon. Returning Officer, Professor Segar, forwarded the results of the selection, and these names were then communicated to the Governors.

Stewart Island.—At the last annual meeting a resolution was passed to the effect that the Hon. G. M. Thomson be asked to report to the Standing Committee on the increase and spread of white-tailed deer on Stewart Island, and the consequent damage to the native flora and fauna. Mr. Thomson forwarded his report, which was considered at a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 3rd July. The report is as follows:—

“The Virginian or white-tailed deer (Cariacus virginianus) was introduced into New Zealand in 1915, when two stags and seven hinds were liberated at the head of one of the arms of Port Pegasus, Stewart Island. From time to time reports were heard of their increase, but, as there is practically no settlement beyond a fishing-station in the inlet, it is difficult to get information. But Mr. W. J. Thomson, of Half-moon Bay, who has interests in the Port Pegasus station, has furnished me with some information which is thoroughly reliable. I quote from his letter to me of the 28th February:—

“White-tailed deer are now thoroughly established on the south portion of the island, and it is only a question of time when they will be a curse—when their numbers will exceed what the place will carry. I have been through a goodly portion of the south part of the island in recent years, and have found little or no destruction to the bush, with the exception of one shrub, the ‘five-leaved gum-tree’ we call it [this is Panax Colensoi]. It is already doomed, as the deer are evidently very fond of it and eat the bark, which kills the tree. Otherwise the bush does not seem to suffer much damage, with the exception that all the young leaves within reach of the herd will be fair game. The only hope for the bush is to keep the deer well under control; once their numbers increase beyond the food-supply, then good-bye to all ferns and small shrubs…. Some time ago I tried, through some friends, to induce the Government to buy Cooper's Island (Ulva), in Paterson Inlet. This island is wonderfully adapted for a bird-sanctuary, being free of all pests, deer, &c. All the New Zealand ground-birds could be liberated there, and I have no doubt, with proper fostering, it could be the bird island of New Zealand.”

“I do not know that the Institute can do anything at the present time except to urge that the control of the animal life on the island should not be allowed to pass into the hands of any acclimatization society. When the time comes the deer should be thinned out, but it is hopeless to eradicate them, as most of the island is nearly inaccessible on account of the thick bush. Bushfelling should also be stopped on the island, as sawmill hands are the greatest enemies of the native avifauna.

G. M. Thomson.”

After hearing the report the Standing Committee resolved to ask Mr. Guthrie-Smith to report on the whole matter of the preservation of the avifauna of Stewart Island. On the 26th July Mr. Guthrie-Smith replied that his visits to Stewart Island had been prior to the introduction of the Virginian deer; he mentioned that Ulva is at present badly infested with rats, which proved fatal to the South Island robin when liberated by Mr. Traill.

Mr. Guthrie-Smith regretted that deer had been liberated in Stewart Island, as the hills of the island were very barren and the deer were forced into the bush. He urged that an endeavour should be made to conserve all islands still virgin, big or small, along the coasts of New Zealand, also the Auckland or Campbell Groups and the Snares.

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This report was received at a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 7th August, when it was decided to thank Mr. Smith for his report, and to inform him that after his next visit to the island the Institute would be glad if he would report further on the matter.

At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 4th December, the Hon. Secretary gave some information in regard to the present owner of Ulva, and it was resolved to ask the Otago Institute to co-operate with the New Zealand Institute in endeavouring to create bird-sanctuaries on the Stewart Island region.

Native-bird Protection.—It was reported at a meeting of the Standing Committee held in December, 1922, that permission had been granted to certain persons to kill native birds for the Empire Exhibition. The President, Professor Kirk, wrote to the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs to ascertain the truth in regard to the report, and suggested to him that, if necessary, specimens for a bird exhibit could be obtained from the various collections in the museums. On the 29th January the Hon. the Minister replied that it was proposed to set up a national-history exhibit in the New Zealand Section of the Exhibition, and that it was desired as far as possible that a representative collection of New Zealand birds should be included in the exhibit. He mentioned that, with a view to ascertaining what specimens would be available, the several museums had been approached, and it appeared extremely doubtful that a suitable exhibit could be supplied from existing specimens. He assured the Institute that, should it be found necessary to take fresh specimens, authority to do so would be given only to approved persons.

This letter was read at a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 6th February, when it was decided to set up a committee, consisting of the Hon. Mr. Thomson, Mr. J. C. Andersen, Major Wilson, and Mr. J. G. Myers, to compile a list of rare birds which should be suggested to the Hon. the Minister as deserving a special protection. And it was further resolved to ask the Hon. the Minister to allow the Institute to concur or dissent in any permit issued for the taking of native birds; or, if this is not acceptable, to refer the matter to the Board of Science and Art. The Hon. the Minister has replied that he is considering the matter.

On the 15th November the Hon. G. M. Thomson reported that a Bill on the subject of bird-protection had been passed in Parliament the previous session; it was amended and made more stringent during the past session, and the Bird Protection Society was formed, which has broadcasted information of the subject throughout the country, so that there was nothing more that the committee appointed by the Standing Committee could do.

Travelling-expenses.—At last annual meeting it was resolved that the opinion of incorporated societies be taken on the question of pooling the expenses of members of the Board when attending annual meetings of the Institute, and each society paying its share, an estimate of the cost, under this proposal, being sent to each society. This was done, and the societies replied as follows: Wellington Philosophical Society, Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, Otago Institute, Manawatu Philosophical Society, and Nelson Institute all agreed to the proposal; Wanganui Philosophical Society would prefer to pay the expenses of its own representative; Auckland Institute and Hawke's Bay Institute do not agree to the proposal; Poverty Bay Institute has not replied.

Carter Bequest.—At the last annual meeting it was resolved that the Institute endeavour to obtain the permission of the Court to use £2,000 of the Carter Bequest moneys for the erection of an observatory according to the committee's majority report. At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 7th April it was resolved to ascertain what the cost of applying to the Supreme Court for a declaratory judgment would be, and whether the cost could be met from the Carter funds. The Board's legal advisers were accordingly consulted, and on the 11th June an opinion was received from them in which they stated that they were unable to make an estimate of the cost of an application by the Institute to the Court by reason of the uncertainty into what direction the proceedings might develop. The Standing Committee considered this opinion, and it was resolved that a committee, consisting of the President, Dr. Marshall, and Mr. Aston, be appointed a committee to report.

The resolution of the annual meeting referred to above was then referred to the solicitors, and at a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 17th August an opinion from them, dated 31st July, was read. It concluded with the following statement: “To ask the Court to authorize £2,000 to be paid out of the fund for a small observatory is a departure from the objects the Institute had in view at the time of that last-mentioned minute—namely, to ‘hasten the increase of the fund towards the realization of the testator's wishes.’ It means the establishing of two observatories,

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when the testator, as we think, meant only one. We are of opinion the resolution of January, 1923, should not have been passed, and that the Board of Governors should reconsider it with a view to its rescission.” It was resolved to forward copies of both these opinions to members of the Board of Governors and to members of the Carter Bequest Committee, and that further action be suspended until the annual meeting.

Management of Trust Funds.—At last annual meeting a resolution was passed to the effect that half of 1 per cent. of the capital invested on account of the Carter, Hector, Hutton, and Hamilton Trust Funds be contributed by these funds towards the cost of administration.

At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 6th February it was resolved that before ½ per cent. is deducted from the trust funds the Standing Committee should take steps to ascertain that it can legally do so. Accordingly the Board's legal advisers were consulted, and they gave it as their opinion that the Board of Governors can lawfully expend a reasonable amount of the income of the funds in expenses of management. The Standing Committee resolved, however, that the resolution of the annual meeting regarding the allocation of a portion of trust funds for management expenses be held in abeyance until after the next annual meeting.

Storage of Books.—With the removal of the office and library of the Institute to Victoria College the matter of the storage of the stocks of publications which had been stored in the attic of the Museum became urgent. The Hon. G. M. Thomson had previously made representations to the Internal Affairs Department regarding the possibility of obtaining a suitable room in the Parliamentary Buildings for the surplus stocks, and on the 1st February a room in the basement of the old Parliamentary Buildings was promised to the Institute. Difficulties arose, however, in regard to securing the room, as the Public Works Department had some claim to it. When the removal of the office and library to Victoria College took place the Acting Director of the Museum had the Institute's books removed to a small room in the basement of the Parliamentary Buildings. This room is not suitable, as at present it is also used for other purposes, and there is no space available in it to allow of sorting the Institute's publications into any kind of order.

Hon. Treasurer's Visit to Europe.—On the 22nd March the Hon. Treasurer applied for six months' leave of absence, as he desired to visit Europe. At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 11th April the necessary leave was granted, and a letter of introduction to scientific bodies was given to Mr. Eliott. It was resolved that during the Hon. Treasurer's absence the President be authorized to sign cheques conjointly with the Hon. Secretary.

Dominion Museum.—During the year the matter of the lack of suitable Museum buildings was brought prominently before the Acting Prime Minister, Sir Francis Bell, by a deputation of Wellington members of Parliament. The question of sites was discussed, and Mount Cook site, Sir Francis Bell said, was looked upon most favourably by the Government. The immediate result is that in the meantime some of the most valuable exhibits are to be stored in fireproof rooms in the Dominion Farmers' Institute Buildings.

Contoured Topographical Map of New Zealand.—At the annual meeting in 1920 a resolution was passed urging the necessity of a contoured topographical map. The Lands and Survey Department has to be congratulated on the very fine maps which it has issued of the Dunedin and Wellington districts.

Resolutions passed by the Standing Committee during the Year and not otherwise mentioned in the Report.

1. On the 11th April it was resolved to pay any travelling-expenses incurred by the President in attending the Tongariro National Park Board.

2. On the 11th April it was resolved, That, in the case of any amendment to the Tongariro National Park Act, the Government should be approached in the direction of allowing the New Zealand Institute to have a representative elected by the Institute, who would not necessarily be the President, as it is customary to hold the office of President for only two years.

3. On the 12th June Professor Cotton intimated that he was unable to continue to act as Hon. Librarian, and it was resolved to appoint Professor Kirk in his place.

4. On the 12th June it was resolved to bind a complete set of the Transactions of the Institute in buckram for the library. This work is nearly completed: it was held up owing to the binder having to order fresh supplies of buckram from England.

The report was discussed clause by clause.

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Hector Medal.—It was resolved that in future the Award Committee of the year be asked to suggest the inscription which should be placed on each medal; the attention of the committee to be directed to the previous inscriptions in volume 53.

Stewart Island Sanctuary.—On the motion of Dr. J. A. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Cockayne, it was resolved, That the control of the animal life on Stewart Island should be retained by the Government and should not be allowed to pass into the hands of any acclimatization society.

Travelling-expenses.—On the motion of Mr. Wright, seconded by Dr. J. A. Thomson, it was resolved, That the New Zealand Institute pay the travelling-expenses of members of the Board of Governors.

Proposal to charge Expenses for managing Trust Funds.—On the motion of the President, seconded by Mr. Eliott, it was resolved to rescind the resolution passed at last annual meeting empowering the Board to deduct ½ per cent. of the capital of the trust funds for management expenses.

Storage of Stock of Publications.—It was resolved to leave the matter of the storage of the immense stock of publications held by the Institute to the Standing Committee.

Dominion Museum.—On the motion of Dr. Farr, seconded by Mr. Hill, it was resolved, That the New Zealand Institute urge the Government to proceed at the earliest possible moment with the erection of a suitable building for the Dominion Museum in Wellington.

The Standing Committee's report was amended and adopted.

Hector Award for 1924.—The President then read the report of the Committee of Award recommending the award of this medal to Mr. D. Petrie for his botanical work. The recommendation of the committee (Drs. Chilton and Cockayne) was unanimously adopted.

Ngaio, Wellington, 5th January, 1924.

The President, New Zealand Institute.

Dear Sir,—

We, the members of the Recommendation Committee, having carefully considered the claims of those botanists we judge eligible for the Hector Medal and Prize, unhesitatingly recommend the award to be made to Mr. Donald Petrie, M.A., F.N.Z.Inst., on account of his pioneer investigations of the distribution of the plants of Otago and Stewart Island, which brought forth much information essential for New Zealand plant-geography, together with his further botanical explorations in most parts of the North and South Islands, carried out year by year since 1876, and his many contributions towards a more accurate knowledge of the flora of New Zealand.

In making this recommendation we have greatly missed the advice of our late distinguished colleague, Mr. T. F. Cheeseman, whose death we deeply deplore, but, we feel assured that he would have fully agreed with our decision.

Leonard Cockayne, Convener.
Chas. Chilton
.

Financial Reports.—On the motion of the Hon. Treasurer, the following financial statements for the year ending 31st December, 1923, which had been duly audited by the Auditor-General, were adopted: Statement of Receipts and Expenditure; Statement of Research Grants; Statement of Assets and Liabilities; Statement of Carter, Hector, Hutton, and Hamilton Trust Accounts.

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Honorary Treasurer's Report for Year Ending 31St December, 1923.

The statement of assets over liabilities shows a very satisfactory position. The credit balance has increased from £233 1s. 5d. on the 31st December, 1922, to £869 15s. 3d. on the 31st December, 1923, the surplus from the year's working being £636 13s. 10d.

With regard to the Government research grants, the total amount paid out to various applicants, less refunds, amounts to £285 6s. 10d.; and, as no further grants have been received from the Treasury, the fund has now been reduced to £971 5s. 8d.

The various trust accounts are in a healthy state. The Carter Bequest Capital Account has grown from £5,155 1s. 10d. to £5,455 15s., the revenue for the year, earned from investments in Government bonds, amounting to £320 17s. 2d., which is equal to 6.2 per cent. on the amount standing to the credit of the Capital Account on the 31st December, 1922. This fund will continue to grow, as the interest is being reinvested in Government bonds as it accumulates. The investments of the Hector and Hutton Memorial Funds give a return of 5.82 per cent.

The books and accounts have been well and accurately kept by the Assistant-Secretary.

M. A. Eliott, Hon. Treasurer.

New Zealand Institute.—Statement of Receipts and Expenditure for the Year Ending 31st December, 1923.

Receipts. £ s. d.
Balance as at 31st December, 1922 2,168 4 6
Petty cash as at 31st December, 1922 6 3 10
Statutory grant 1,000 0 0
Publications sold 131 17 11
Refunds by research grantees 41 7 10
Interest, Post Office Savings-bank 64 1 1
Interest on Endowment Fund invested in inscribed stock 5 0 0
Contributions to Publication Fund 2 10 6
Interest, Carter Legacy, £50 2 5 0
Interest on Carter Bequest 318 15 0
Interest on Hector Fund 68 10 0
Interest on Hutton Fund 58 10 0
Interest on Hamilton Fund 1 2 6
Refund from Carter Bequest, Post Office Savings-bank Account 155 5 6
Refund from Hutton Memorial Fund 9 0 0
£4,032 13 8
Expenditure. £ s. d.
Government Printer 449 17 3
Petty cash (postages) 15 15 2
Salaries 258 6 8
Charges (bank commission, premiums) 4 13 4
Travelling-expenses 39 11 4
Adlard and Son (plates) 3 6 9
Library removal (cartage assistance) 22 4 9
Hector Prize for 1922 45 0 0
Carter interest reinvested 300 13 2
Hutton Fund research grant 40 0 0
Research grants, as per list 326 14 8
Endowment Fund invested 198 19 4
Hamilton Prize 4 0 0
Carter Fund—Interest to Account 180 5 8
Hutton Fund—Interest to Account 27 10 0
Balance as under 2,115 15 7
£4,032 13 8
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£ s. d.
Balance in Bank of New Zealand 62 7 2
Balance in Post Office Savings-bank 2,042 19 9
Petty cash in hand 10 8 8
£2,115 15 7

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Made up as follows:— Dr. Cr.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
    Endowment Fund Revenue Account 63 14 4
    Government Research Grant balance 971 5 8
    Library Fund 245 15 0
    Hector Fund overdrawn 6 14 10
    Hamilton Fund overdrawn 0 3 11
1 14 10
    Sundry debtors 12 12 6
    Carter Bequest Revenue Account 35 8 11
    Hutton Memorial Fund Revenue Account 20 11 10
    Wheldon and Wesley in credit 0 4 3
    Carter Legacy—Interest on £50 2 5 0
    Carter Bequest—Post Office Savings-bank Account 35 8 11
    Hector Memorial Fund—Post Office Savings-bank Account 14 15 2
    Hutton Memorial Fund—Post Office Savings-bank Account 20 11 10
    Hamilton Memorial Fund—Post Office Savings-bank Account 1 2 8
    Profit on year's work 869 15 3
£93 4 8 £2,209 0 3
93 4 8
£2,115 15 7

Examined and found correct—J. H. Fowler, Deputy Controller and Auditor-General.

M. A. Eliott, Hon. Treasurer.

New Zealand Institute.—Statement of Liabilities and Assets as at 31St December, 1923.

Liabilities. £ s. d.
Carter Bequest Capital Account 5,455 15 0
Hector Fund Capital Account 1,184 18 1
Hutton Fund Capital Account 1,014 5 10
Hamilton Fund Capital Account 48 7 11
Endowment Fund Capital Account 198 19 4
Carter Bequest Revenue Account 35 8 11
Hutton Fund Revenue Account 20 11 10
Endowment Fund Revenue Account 63 14 4
Government research grants—Balance 971 5 8
Library Fund 245 15 0
Carter Legacy—Interest, £50 2 5 0
Wheldon and Wesley, in credit 0 4 3
Balance of assets over liabilities 869 15 3
£10,111 6 5
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Assets. £ s. d.
Inscribed stock, Discharged Soldiers Settlement Loan, £7,650 7,068 2 11
Post Office inscribed stock, £800 785 15 4
Government war bonds, £50 48 11 10
Hector Fund—Revenue Account overdrawn 6 14 10
Hamilton Fund—Revenue Account overdrawn 1 14 10
Cash in Bank of New Zealand 62 7 2
Cash in Post Office Savings-bank 2,042 19 9
Cash in Post Office Savings-bank—Carter Account 35 8 11
Cash in Post Office Savings-bank—Hector Fund Account 14 15 2
Cash in Post Office Savings-bank—Hutton Fund Account 20 11 10
Cash in Post Office Savings-bank—Hamilton Fund Account 1 2 8
Petty cash in hand 10 8 8
Sundry debtors 12 12 6
£10,111 6 5

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New Zealand Institute.—Government Research Grants for Year Ending 31st December, 1923.
Dr. Cr.
1923. £ s. d. £ s. d.
Jan. 1. By Balance 1,256 12 6
Mar. 1. Mr. W. G. Morrison—Refund 26 19 7
April 4. Professor Easterfield—Refund 8 0 6
Dec. 20. Dr. Adams—Refund 6 7 9
Jan. 8. To Professor Easterfield 100 0 0
Feb. 24. Professor Evans 94 13 10
Professor Farr 2 4 8
Dr. Hilgendorf 2 10 0
Dr. Marsden 5 0 4
Professor Malcolm 16 13 4
Aug. 8. Dr. Marshall 25 0 0
Dr. Allan 10 0 0
Sept. 20. Dr. Hilgendorf 16 5 6
Oct. 8. Professor Worley 9 7 0
Nov. 15. Dr. Marshall 25 0 0
Nov. 28. Dr. Adams 20 0 0
Dec. 31. Balance 971 5 8
£1,298 0 4 £1,298 0 4

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New Zealand Institute Trust Accounts.
Carter Bequest Revenue Account for Year ending 31st December, 1923.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
To Interest invested in in- By Balance 8 6 6
scribed stock 300 13 2 Books sold by auction 4 13 4
Balance 35 8 11 Books exchanged for Transactions 2 5 0
Interest on investments 318 15 0
Interest, Post Office Savings-bank 2 2 3
£336 2 1 £336 2 1
By Balance £35 8 11
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Hector Memorial Fund Revenue Account for Year ending 31st December, 1923.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
To Balance 30 19 9 By Interest on investments 68 10 0
Cheque, Dr. Farr (prize) 45 0 0 Interest, Post Office Savings-bank 0 14 11
Balance 6 14 10
£75 19 9 £75 19 9
To Balance £6 14 10

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Hutton Memorial Fund Revenue Account for Year ending 31st December, 1923.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
To Research grant, Dr. Marshall 40 0 0 By Balance 1 7 1
Balance 20 11 10 Interest on investment 58 10 0
Interest, Post Office Savings-bank 0 14 9
£60 11 10 £60 11 10
By Balance £20 11 10

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

Hamilton Memorial Fund Revenue Account for Year ending 31st December, 1923.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
To Cheque, Mr. Myers (prize) 4 0 0 By Interest on war bonds 2 5 0
Interest Post Office Savings-bank 0 0 2
Balance 1 14 10
£4 0 0 £4 0 0
To Balance £1 14 10

Levy on Incorporated Societies for Volume 55.—On the motion of Mr. Hill, seconded by Mr. Eliott, it was resolved, That the levy for volume 55 be 5s. for the combined volume.

Research Grant Report.—This report was adopted. On the motion of Professor Worley, seconded by Dr. Marshall, it was resolved, That this meeting of the Board of Governors strongly urges the Government to reinstate an adequate research grant to be administered by the New Zealand Institute, and that the following gentlemen form a deputation to wait on the Government: The President and President-Elect, Hon. Mr. G. M. Thomson, Dr. J. A. Thomson, Dr. L. Cockayne, and Professor T. H. Easterfield.

Research Grant Report for Year Ending 31st December, 1923.

Dr. C. E. Adams, who in 1919 was granted, through the Wellington Phoilsophical Society, £55 for purchasing astronomical instruments for the Astronomical Section of the society, was during the year granted a further £20 in order to complete the mounting of certain instruments. Dr. Adams reported on the 11th December that this work is progressing.

Dr. C. E. Adams, on the 11th December, refunded £6 8s. 3d., balance of a grant for investigating astronomical and geophysical sites in Otago.

Dr. H. H. Allan during the year was granted, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, £30 for a research on the selection and breeding of valuable economic strains in rye-grasses and cocksfoot. On the 26th November Dr. Allan reported that he was investigating these grasses along the lines of persistency, abundance of herbage, quality, disease-resistance; also investigating the life-histories of the various growth forms to be found in both species, the root-development in detail, the effect on both

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species of various grasses and clovers commonly used in mixtures with them, and the yield of seed from various methods of growing—namely, broadcast and Danish system—and the effect of seed-treatment in germination. Some seventy-five samples of seed have been obtained from various countries, and a spring sowing has been made from each sample. The Board of Governors and the Director of the Agricultural High School in Feilding have allotted the required areas of ground, and provision has been made for areas required as the work extends. So far the only expenditure has been £2 2s. 9d. The Institute has a balance in hand of £20, and Dr. Allan the remainder.

Dr. Hilgendorf, convener of the Artesian Wells Committee, which in 1921 was granted, through the Phiosophical Institute of Canterbury, £100, reported on the 6th December that early in the year recorders were erected in several country wells to obviate the interference observed in the town wells from the pumping from adjacent wells. Also, a recorder was erected in the River Avon with the object of elucidating the cause of some of its fluctuations. Observations were steadily carried out throughout the year, and it is proposed to continue until enough accumulates to justify publication. The apparatus required has been made free by Canterbury College and Lincoln College, and the balance of the grant, which is in the hands of the Institute, is £41 8s. 8d.

Mr. Brittin, who in 1919 was granted, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, £100 for research into fruit-diseases, reported on the 16th December that owing to ill health he had been unable to continue the research, and he deemed it advisable to give up all further work in connection with the grant. The balance in the hands of the Institute is £80.

Professor Burbidge, who in 1921 was granted, through the Auckland Institute, £100 for a research on the intensity of long-wave wireless, reported on the 26th December that apparatus had been installed. Signals were received, but not in proper intensity, and the apparatus had been redesigned. This involved putting in measured high resistance and small capacities (for a resistance capacity amplification), and these adjustments have taken considerable time. This, combined with lack of time from routine work for research, has accounted for delay in getting measurements, but this year the work should be well on the way with measurements. During the year Professor Burbidge was granted an additional £25, as the apparatus purchased absorbed all the £100. So far the Institute still has the £25.

Dr. Curtis, who in 1920 was granted, through the Nelson Institute, £100 for research in parasitic mycology, reported on the 20th December that the work carried out during the year was in preparation for the press. The whole of the grant was expended in books.

Mr. W. C. Davies, who in 1921 was granted, through the Nelson Institute, £50 for research on soil bacteria and protozoa, reported on the 20th December that pressure of routine work had prevented rapid progress of the investigations, but useful results have been obtained from the experiments in connection with some of the more barren soils of the Nelson District and in the partial sterihzation of hothouse soils. The whole of the grant has been expended.

Professor Easterfield, who in 1921, through the Nelson Institute, was granted £200 for investigations in orchard chemistry, reported on the 20th December that work had been systematically carried out throughout the year in the direction of improving the spreading-power of sprays and studying the effect of different cool-store conditions on the keeping-quality of fruit. Observations have been carried out in three stores, using different systems of cooling, upon the most commonly stored varieties of fruit picked in different types of soil. Sufficient data has been collected to allow of certain deductions to be drawn. An account of the experiments and the results will be published shortly. The experiments are being continued. £100 has been expended as part salary of an orchard chemist, who has given his whole time to the work.

Professor Easterfield, who in 1919, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, was granted £250 for an investigation of mineral oils, reported on the 20th December that the research had been completed as far as is at present practicable, and the balance of £8 0s. 6d. has been refunded. The results of the investigation have been published in Chemistry and Industry Review, vol. 42, No. 39, p. 936 (London, 28th Sept., 1923).

Professor Evans, who in 1918–21, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, was granted £600 for a research on New Zealand brown coals, reported on the 29th November that owing to unfavourable conditions no further work had been possible, and he considered it best to resign the balance of the grant—namely, £125 6s. 2d. This amount is in the hands of the Institute.

Dr. C. C. Farr, who in 1921 was granted, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, £75 (£60 of which was transferred to another grant) for a research on the physical properties of gas-free sulphur, reported on the 11th January that during the

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past year work had proceeded, and, although difficulties had arisen, as always in physical work, they were being overcome, and it is hoped shortly to be able to say something definite as regards the interesting problems solved. The balance of the grant is £12 15s. 4d., which is in the hands of the Institute.

Dr. C. C. Farr, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, was during the year granted £30 for a research on the relationship between radium-emanation and goitre, reported on the 11th January, 1924, that experimental work in connection with this investigation was being undertaken by Mr. Rogers, who has re-examined the radium-emanation content of certain school wells near Christchurch and at Timaru, with a view to comparing it with the goitre incidence in the same schools. The question of the iodine-content of the same water is also being gone into. It is hoped to carry the research further during the year. So far the only expenditure has been in travelling-expenses. The grant has not yet been called on.

Mr. H. J. Finlay, through the Otago Institute, was during the year granted £10 for the purchase of books on palaeontology. On the 4th December Mr. Finlay reported that certain of the works had been received from Paris and the remainder were being forwarded. The grant has not yet been called on.

Mr. F. W. Foster, who during the year was granted £25 for the work of collating the manuscripts of the late Sir David Hutchins, reported on the 28th November that he had spent a good deal of time in sorting out the notes and placing them in some order. He found that sections on certain important aspects of New Zealand forestry were missing, and some time was spent in going through the library of the deceased, and eventually he found the missing sections and some other valuable manuscripts whose existence was not previously suspected. He is arranging the matter under three main heads: (1) Native forests and forest-trees of mid and southern New Zealand; (2) exotic trees and plantations; (3) New Zealand forest policy. Mr. Foster reports that the work is proving far more protracted than he at first anticipated, but most of the matter so far dealt with is of a valuable nature. No portion of the grant has yet been paid over.

Mr. H. Hamilton was, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, granted £30 for a research on cave fauna of New Zealand. On the 5th December Mr. Hamilton reported that he has not yet undertaken the research, but he intends visiting Waitomo Caves at an early date.

Professor Inglis, who, through the Otago Institute, was granted £25 for a research on the essential oils of native plants, reported on the 29th November that larger distillation apparatus had been ordered, and preliminary work on a number of plants had already been done with his smaller apparatus. Next year the work will be carried on with the new apparatus, and an arrangement has been made with Professor Worley, who is working on a similar research, to avoid overlapping, and first experiments will be made upon (a) Dacrydium cupressium, (b) Dacrydium biforme, (c) Aciphylla, (d) Myoporum laetum.

Professor Jack, who, through the Otago Institute, was in 1917 granted £25 for a research of the electric charge on rain, reported on the 20th December that further investigations had been carried out during the year, and the work was sent forward as a thesis. Professor Jack is now ordering new apparatus so that the work will be advanced further.

Mr. E. K. Lomas, who, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, was during the year granted £25 for a research on the intelligence of school-children, reported on the 20th December that he hoped to commence the research early in the year.

Professor Malcolm, who, through the Otago Institute, in 1919–21 was granted £425 for a research on the food value of New Zealand fish, reported on the 22nd December that early in the year a paper on the chemistry of the New Zealand paua was finished and sent for publication in the Transactions as Part IV of the series. Later in the year a special research was begun in conjunction with Mr. C. L. Carter, M.Sc., on the nature of the fats and oils in the mutton-bird. This is likely to throw light on the digestibility of the oils derived from the fish consumed by the bird. He hopes to publish results next year. Balance of the grant, which is in hands of Institute, is £68 6s. 8d.

Professor Malcolm, who, through the Otago Institute, in 1918 was granted £30 for a research on the New Zealand plant poisons, reported on the 22nd December that a considerable number of observations had been made as opportunity offered on tutin, pukateine, and karaka, and these will be published when completed. Some useful books bearing on the subject have been procured, and Dr. Rawnsley has prepared a thesis on convulsive poisons, including tutin, and it is hoped to publish these later. Balance of grant is £9 6s. 7d., which grantee holds.

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Dr. Marshall, who, through the Wanganui Philosophical Society, during the year was granted £30 for a research on Upper Cretaceous fauna of New Zealand, reported on the 23rd November that he had made three collecting-visits to the north of Auckland (Whangaroa and Kaipara), and he had collected some forty-five species of ammonites. The whole year had been spent in identifying and classifying these. The extensive literature, and difficulty in preparing specimens and making the necessary drawings, had taken much time, but the research is now almost ready for publication. Grantee has had the whole of this grant.

Mr. J. G. Myers, who, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, was during the year granted £10 for a research on the New Zealand Hemiptera, reported on the 27th November that, as the season for collecting was commencing, he hoped to commence his research.

Professor Speight, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1919 was granted £225 for a geological survey of the Malvern Hills, reported on the 11th December that during the year an examination had been made of various parts of the district, including the Rakaia Gorge, High Peak, Rockwood, and Benmore areas, the first two largely with the help of students, who had used those areas for subjects for M.A. and M.Sc. theses. A paper dealing with the last-named area was read by Professor Speight before the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, and will be sent to the IIon. Editor of the Transactions for publication. Some attention has also been given to the more promising Glenroy and Steventon area, the latter being specially promising, and if systematically bored would probably prove to be a fairly extensive brown-coal field. The work in connection with these areas has reached such a stage that it is advisable to deal with the possibilities of the clays and sands for the purposes of earthenware, brick, and other manufactures.

Mr. Page, B.Sc, late assistant to Professor Evans, of Canterbury College, made a proposition to Mr. Speight dealing with this aspect of the matter, and Mr. Speight obtained the approval of the Standing Committee to divert portion of the grant to carrying out investigation on the clays. The balance of the grant in hands of Institute is £175.

Messrs. Wild and Tankersley, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, were during the year granted £25 for soil-survey work in the Manawatu district, reported on the 27th November that they had arranged to get the use of the chemical balance obtained by the Hon. Mr. G. M. Thomson for his research on whale-feed. Some material had been collected and preliminary work begun. No expenditure had so far been incurred.

Professor Worley, who, through the Auckland Institute, during the year was granted £25 for a research on the essential oils of native plants, reported on the 29th November that research had been carried out on the essential oil of Leptospermumscoparium, and is partly completed. Additions and alterations have been made to the distillation apparatus, and expenditure to the amount of £9 7s. incurred. Balance in hands of Institute, £15 13s.

Mr. A. M. Wright, who, through the Canterbury Philosophical Institute, was in 1921 granted £75 for a research on the vitamine-content of commercial meat products reported on the 4th December that, owing to its being impossible to procure a supply of white rats for further experimental work on the presence or otherwise of Vitamine C in frozen foods, and also for the purpose of determining the effect of dietary modifications to include various canned meats, the most important work planned in connection with this investigation had been postponed. The method of determining the presence of Vitamine B by the yeast-culture method had been further investigated, but until animal experiments are carried out in parallel the results obtained may be of doubtful value. Three papers have been published covering the results obtained, and these have been published in the Journal of the Society of Chemical Industry, and in vol. 4. Nos. 2 and 3, New Zealand Journal of Science and Technology. Balance of grant in hands of Institute is £25.

Hutton Fund Research Grants.

Professor Marshall, who in 1923 was granted £10 to enable him to continue his work on the Upper Cretaceous ammonites of New Zealand, reported on the 22nd November that the work has proved to be of considerable complexity and difficulty, but it is now almost ready for publication.

Miss Mestayor, who in 1918 was granted £10, reported on the 4th December that owing to college lectures she was unable to publish any papers on Mollusca this year. She has material waiting which she hopes to describe and figure during 1924. There is still a balance of £5, which she hopes to use next year.

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Research Work.—At the last annual meeting the following resolution was passed: “That the Research Grant Committee be asked to make a comprehensive report on the state of all researches undertaken with the Institute's financial aid during the last ten years.” The following report has therefore been compiled, and a property list containing the books and apparatus, &c., bought out of the Research Grant Fund is appended.

Report on the Research Work of the New Zealand Institute, May, 1923.

Dr. C. E. Adams in 1919 was granted £55, as Chairman of the Astronomical Section of the Wellington Philosophical Society, for the purchase of astronomical instruments. The British Astronomical Association purchased for him a micrometer eye-piece, wedge photometer, and objective prism. The last instrument was purchased in 1922, when Dr. Adams applied for an additional grant of £20 for mounting and cost of camera. This application was granted on the 12th June, 1923.

Dr. C. E. Adams in 1919 was granted £150 to enable him to undertake systematic observations in Central Otago, and such other localities as decided on by the Astronomical Section, to test the seeing and other conditions of sites for an observatory. In 1921 the Internal Affairs Department stated that, as the expenses in connection with the testing of sites was being undertaken by the Department, the grant would not be required. Dr. Adams had expended £26 5s. 5d. on instruments, and he asked permission to retain these for another year, which permission was granted. The balance of the grant was surrendered.

Mr. L. Birks in 1916 was granted £10 for carrying out experiments in electrical prevention of frosts in orchards. In 1919 Mr. Birks was transferred from Christchurch to Wellington, and he refunded the grant, of which nothing had been expended.

Mr. G. Brittin in 1919 was granted £100 for a research in fruit-tree diseases. The work consisted in special pruning and spraying, and noting the effects. He had secured the loan of a microtome, and was able to prepare sections of the later stages of some of the diseases. Dr. Curtis, of Cawthron Institute, was assisting in the examination of the fungus causing die-back. The results of the experimental work in regard to pruning and spraying were satisfactory, but final results have not yet been reached. The expenses so far have been slight, and certain orchardists have gladly loaned their trees for the research. Mr. Brittin gave an address before the Fruitgrowers' Association, and this was published in the Nelson Mail on the 7th October, 1922.

Professor P. W. Burbidge in 1921 was granted £100 for a research on the intensity of long-wave signals from Europe. The apparatus, which cost over £100, arrived towards the end of 1922, and Professor Burbidge reported that it was being assembled and a commencement being made. He applied for an additional £25 for current out-of-pocket expenses. This application was granted on the 12th June, 1923.

Dr. Chas. Chilton in 1918 was granted £50 for an investigation of New Zealand flax, particularly with a view to determining the varieties that will give the fibre of greatest economic value, and of the best conditions of cultivation for these varieties. Mrs. Jennings carried out the investigations, and made considerable progress, more particularly in the direction of commencing observations and experiments in regard to the diseases affecting the flax, improved methods of cultivation, &c. Early in 1919 Mrs Jennings (then Mrs. Dr. McCallum) had to leave for England; the work had to remain incomplete, and the unexpended portion of the grant—namely, £39—was refunded.

Dr. K. M. Curtis in 1920 was granted £100 for a research in parasitic mycology. In studying the early stages in the penetration of the germ-tube of the black-spot fungus into several varieties of pear it was found that varietal peculiarities, correlated with the relative susceptibility of the host, and of a degree sufficiently marked for advantage to be taken of them by selection in breeding, were not exhibited either by the fungus as it penetrated the host plant, or by the host itself as the result of that penetration. Owing, therefore, to the absence of sufficiently marked infectional peculiarities, this work has been concluded and attention directed instead to brown-rot of stone-fruits. The whole of the grant has been expended in books, the apparatus required in the research being available in the Cawthron Institute.

Mr. W. C. Davies in 1921 was granted £50 for a research on soil-bacteria and protozoa. The work included investigation of the bacteria of several typical soils of the Nelson district, particularly of the loams of the Moutere and Port Hills. Work has also been commenced on the soils of the Nelson tomato-houses, with the object

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of identifying the protozoa and studying the effects of several methods of partial sterilization of the soil-life. A laboratory has been fitted up, and experimental work in plate and pot culture has been carried out. The whole of the grant has been expended in apparatus and books.

Professor T. H. Easterfield in 1918–19 was granted £250 for an investigation in the wax-content of New Zealand brown coals. A commencement with the work was delayed owing to the war and the illness of Professor Easterfield's assistant. In 1921 a paper embodying the results of this investigation was read at the Science Congress in Palmerston North. In this paper the location of mineral oils was given, and allusion was made to the attempts to supply mineral-oil by distillation of oil-shales at Orepuki. The sulphur-content of the southern shales was stated to be a serious objection. Comparison of the properties of Taranaki and Kotuku oil was given. Professor Easterfield stated that in his opinion the boring of new wells in Taranaki promised at present greater success than development in any other area, but urged that as a matter of Imperial interest systematic prospecting by bores should be carried out in a number of areas. The grant was expended in the salaries of assistants, and the unexpended balance, £8 0s. 6d., was refunded. Publication of the results of the research has been delayed, but the manuscript is ready for the press.

Professor T. H. Easterfield in 1922 was granted £200 for a research on orchardfruits. A preliminary account of this research was recently given to the Fruitgrowers' Association, who have also contributed to the cost of the work; the account was published in the Nelson Erening Mail.

Professor W. P. Evans in 1918 was granted £200, in 1920 a further £200, and in 1921 a further £200, totalling £600, for a research on New Zealand brown coals. The work covered investigation into the distillates of the various coals as regards fuels for internal-combustion engines and primary chemicals for organic work in general. The Canterbury College Council assisted in supplying part salary of an assistant, the remainder being paid from the grant. A large amount of apparatus was purchased, including a ball mill, electric furnance, &c.; analyses and experiments have been made in connection with the various coals, and the results have been good. A general account of the research was presented at the last meeting of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science, and will be published with the report of that meeting.

Professor C. Coleridge Farr in 1919 was granted £100, in 1920 an additional £30, and in 1922 £60, for a research on porcelain insulators. A testing-vessel was constructed, and the tests proved entirely satisfactory. A paper embodying the results was published in the Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (vol. 41, No. 10, Oct., 1922, p. 711), and roused great interest, not only in New Zealand. Crities from Australia and England have spoken most highly of the work. Mr. E. Parry says, “The results are very important, and, what is more, are very much more conclusive than any that have hitherto been published.” The unexpended balance is £55 11s. 6d. Professor Farr and Mr Philpott, his assistant, consider that the work has now become of such a practical nature, and so routine in practice, that any further expenditure upon it should be borne by the Public Works Department and not come upon the Research Grants Fund of the New Zealand Institute, which is essentially for investigations of an uncertam and experimental nature. It is considered that the work has progressed beyond that stage and become of a commercial character.

Professor C. Coleridge Farr in 1921 was granted £75, £60 of which was later transferred to his research on insulators, for a research on the physical properties of gas-free sulphur. Work has been progressing, and the expenditure so far has been only very slight. Professor Farr hopes shortly to publish a paper showing the results of his investigations.

Mr. G. Gray in 1920 was granted £50 for a chemical investigation on the waters of Canterbury. There was a delay in fitting up a laboratory and obtaining apparatus, but 130 samples of water has been collected from Lincoln district and from the Selwyn and Waimakariri Rivers. Mr. Gray then found that his health prevented him from carrying on the investigations, and he surrendered the whole of the grant.

The Artesian Wells Committee, with Dr. Hilgendorf as convener, in 1921 was granted £100 for a research into the sources of supply, constancy of flow, &c., of the artesian wells of the Christchurch area. Recórders for reading the static level in wells have been installed. Observations have been completed in Christchurch, and the recorders have been removed to Lincoln. The work during Dr. Hilgendorf's absence was delayed, but it is now being pushed forward. The expenditure incurred was chiefly in shelters for the recorders, piping, &c.

Mr. H. Hill in 1917 was granted £20 for investigations of the Taupo Plain as to whether artesian water may be expected in certain areas. Mr. Hill expended the whole

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of the grant in preliminary investigations, and application for a further grant was subsequently withdrawn. A paper by Mr. Hill on the subject of artesian wells has been published in volume 54 of the Transactions.

Mr. W. G. Howes in 1919 was granted £30 for a research on the neuropterous fauna. This research was undertaken in company with Dr. Tillyard. Investigations were made in Queenstown, Arthur's Pass, and Moana; the results were good, and a paper dealing with the results of the material gathered is to be submitted. The whole of the grant was expended in travelling-expenses and apparatus.

Sir David Hutchins in 1920 was granted £50 for a research on the growth of native trees, and he obtained valuable data with regard to the growth of rimu, totara, and white-pine. Travelling-expenses and apparatus absorbed the whole of the grant, and the work was incomplete when Sir David Hutchins died. A further £25 was granted to enable the notes of the grantee's work to be collated and published. This work is being proceeded with by Mr. F. W. Foster, of the Forestry Department, under the supervision of the Director of the State Forest Service.

Professor R. Jack in 1917 was granted £25 for investigations of the electrical charge on rain and its connections with the meteorological conditions. Professor Jack promises to furnish a report of this research before the end of the year.

Professor H. B. Kirk in 1917 was granted £25 for investigating methods of killing mosquitoes and larvae. The experiments proved that the cresols in the pure state are not very effective, and that neither they nor the phenols are so effective as a mixture of all together. Professor Kirk found no larvaecide of equal efficiency with light oil. Experiments had also been made with tanglefoot mixtures. The grant was expended in travelling-expenses, &c. A paper embodying results of this work was published in volume 50 of the Transactions.

Messrs. T. L. Lancaster and Cornes in 1919 were granted £50 for an inquiry into the rate and growth of the principal New Zealand timber-trees. Some data on kauri saplings in Titirangi and on the growth-rings was collected, and some observations made in Swanson. Mr. Cornes was removed from Auckland, and owing to pressure of work Mr. Lancaster was unable to continue the work, and the wbole grant was surrendered.

Messrs. W. S. La Trobe and C. E. Adams in 1917 were granted £50 towards out-of-pocket expenses in the construction of a tide-predicting machine, for the purpose of increasing the speed and decreasing the cost of predicting tides for New Zealand. Work was previously performed by laborious calculation at considerable cost, and the services of two officers at this duty are necessary to predict the tides for two ports every year. The grant was overexpended, and application was made for an additional £75. Professor Sommerville and Mr. Hogben having reported favourably on the machine, the application was granted by the Standing Committee, but sanction was withheld by the Hon. the Minister.

Professor J. Malcolm in 1918 was granted £30 for a research on the pharmacology of New Zealand plants. As an outcome of this research, a paper dealing with the tutu fruit and seed was published in volume 51 of the Transactions, and work on pukateine was progressing, although it had been retarded owing to pressure of University work. Books and apparatus were absorbing the grant.

Professor J. Malcolm in 1919 was granted £250 for a research on the composition of New Zealand fishes. In 1920 a further £175 was granted for this purpose, and was mainly expended in the salary of an assistant. Three papers—Part 1 and Part 2. by Mrs. Johnson, his assistant—were published in volumes 52 and 53 of the Transactions, and Part 3, by Professor J. Malcolm and T. B. Hamilton, in volume 55.

Dr. E. Marsden in 1922 was granted a special grant by Internal Affairs of £100 for an investigation of the earthquakes in Taupo. The money was spent on three journeys to Taupo, and on constructing and installing instruments to register the earthquakes. One hundred earthquake records were procured, and are being worked up. The full report on this grant has not yet been presented.

Dr. E. Marsden in 1919 was granted £125 for radium and apparatus for research in the disintegration effect of the impact of a particles on matter. Observations have been made in Samoa and Mount Egmont with the purpose of finding whether it is possible to promote radio-active disintegration. Radium has been purchased and measured, and experiments were directed to ascertain whether or not there is an extraterrestrial radiation of radio-active nature. A preliminary account of the research has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Atmospheric Electricity and Terrestrial Magnetism, and a fuller account is in process of preparation.

Dr. E. Marsden in 1919 was granted £60 for a research on the relative efficiency of coal-gas and electricity for domestic purposes and heating in New Zealand. A paper embodying the results of this research was published in the Journal of Science

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and Technology (vol. 3, Nos. 5, 6). The research was carried on with the assistance of Miss Fenton, and the grant was expended in apparatus and an honorarium to Miss Fenton.

Dr. E. Marsden in 1020 was granted £50 for a research on the physical properties of New Zealand timbers. So far no report has been received on this grant.

Mr. D. D. Milligan in 1922 was granted £50 for an investigation of orthoptera. Two trips have been made to the north of Auckland and some collection made, but the full report of his work has not yet been received.

Mr. W. G. Morrison in 1919 was granted £100 for a research on the afforestation o the Spenser Ranges. Useful data were collected on a tour through the North Island with Professor Wilson of Harvard, and photographs have been taken. A paper on natural afforestation was prepared for presentation to the Science Congress held in Palmerston North, and an earlier paper on this subject was published in the Journal of Science and Technology (vol. 2, Nos. 4, 5). At the end of 1922 Mr. Morrison found he was unable, owing to official duties, to continue the research, and he refunded the unexpended balance.

Dr. D. Petrie in 1917 was granted £20 for an exploration of the grass flora of southern Nelson, &c., but he found he was unable to prosecute the research, and he refunded the grant.

Mr. R. Speight in 1919 was granted £225 for a geological survey of the Malvern Hills. In various parts of the hills experiments have been carried out, some portions showing fair prospects of coal. The examination of the hills is still in progress, and the expenses so far have been confined to field-work, travelling, &c. Preparation for publishing results is being made.

Mr. L. P. Symes in 1916 was granted £50 for an investigation of the causes of deterioration and decay of apples and fruit in cold storage. On account of ill health and pressure of business, Mr. Symes was compelled to surrender the grant.

Mr. H. D. Skinner in 1920 was granted £200 for an ethnographic survey of the South Island. Mr. Beattie was employed as assistant, and the grant was used to pay his salary and expenses. The ground covered was from the Bluff to Kaiapoi, and a large amount of entirely new material relating to Maori life was secured. Mr. Beattie has prepared 750 pages of manuscript embodying the results of this research, and this is waiting publication.

Messrs. R. Speight and L. J. Wild in 1916 were granted £50 for an investigation of the phosphate-yielding rocks of Canterbury. All the localities in Canterbury where it was considered possible that phosphate material might exist in quantity were examined. The work was held up, and, according to resolution of the annual meeting regarding refunding unexpended balances of research grants granted prior to January, 1919, the unexpended portion was refunded. Two papers have been published—one, entitled “The Limestones of Canterbury considered as a Possible Source of Phosphate,” in the Journal of Science and Technology (vol. 2, No. 3, 1919), and “The Stratigraphical Relationship of the Weka Pass Stone and the Amuri Limestone,” in the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute (vol. 50).

Dr. J. A. Thomson in 1919 was granted £100 for an investigation into the chemical character of igneous rocks. Owing to Dr. Thomson's continued illness, this research is in abeyance.

Hon. G. M. and Mr. G. S. Thomson in 1919 were granted £50 for a research on the economic value of whale-feed. There was some delay in obtaining apparatus from England, but with its arrival the research was proceeded with, and a paper giving the results of the work was published in the Journal of Science and Technology (vol. 6, No. 2, p. 111).

Mr. L. J. Wild in 1918 was granted £30 for a soil-survey in Canterbury. In connection with this Mr. Wild prepared a paper, which was published in the Journal of Science and Technology (vol. 3, No. 2), entitled “The Calcium-carbonate Content of some Soils from Canterbury and Southland.” The expenses incurred were slight, and the balance was refunded as per resolution of the annual meeting referred to above. Early in 1923 Mr. Wild applied for another grant to enable him to undertake a soil-survey in the Manawatu district. £25 was granted for this purpose on condition that the survey was restricted to that portion of the Manawatu district lying to the north of the Manawatu River.

Mr. A. M. Wright in 1921 was granted £75 for a research on the vitamine-content of commercial meat products. The research is still in progress, and, although the earlier results have been the subject of various lectures, &c., nothing has so far been published. Mr. Wright explains that he had intended publishing in the Transactions, but owing to the delay in the issue of the volume he is arranging to publish elsewhere, and hopes to do so before the end of the year. Expenditure has been in books and apparatus.

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Grants from the Hutton Memorial Fund.

Dr. C. Chilton in 1911 was granted £10 from the Hutton Fund towards the cost of preparing illustrations for a revision of the New Zealand Crustacea. These illustrations were used in papers published in the Transactions (vols. 43 and 44), in Journal of the Linnean Society (vol. 32), and in Annals of Natural History (ser. 8, vol. 18, &c.).

Dr. F. W. Hilgendorf in 1914 was granted £10 for apparatus required for researches on artesian wells in Canterbury. Money was expended in making and fixing apparatus for securing a continuourecord of the fluctuations in the height of an artesian well near Christchurch. A further application for £5 was declmed. A paper entitled “Fluctuation of Water-level in a Christchurch Artesian Well,” by L. Symes, and a paper entitled “Fluctuations in the Water-level of some Artesian Wells in the Christchurch Area,” by Dr. Hilgendorf, were published in Transactions (vol. 49).

Mr. T. Hall in 1914 was granted £20 for collecting entomological and other specimens of the New Zealand fauna for Dr. Chilton and Major Broun. The grant was used in travelling and other expenses incurred in collecting in the Rakaia Gorge, and in the region of Lake Wakatipu, Routeburn Valley, &c. Coleoptera and other specimens collected were sent to Major Broun and to Dr. Chilton.

Major T. Broun in 1916 was granted £50 towards the publication of his researches on the New Zealand Coleoptera.

Mr. W. R. B. Oliver in 1915 was granted £15 to defray travelling-expenses and cost of apparatus for a visit to Lord Howe Island, undertaken in November, 1913; and in the Transactions (vol. 49, pp. 94–161) he published a paper entitled “The Vegetation of Lord Howe Island.”

Portobello Marine Fish-hatchery (G. M. Thomson, Esq.) was granted £25 in 1916 for prosecuting research on the distribution of native marine food-fishes. Investigations were carried on, and a pamphlet, written by Mr. Anderton, late curator of the hatchery, and the Hon. G. M. Thomson, on the history of the Portobello Fish-hatchery, contained statements of all that has been done.

In 1919 Miss M. K Mestayer was granted £10 for a research on the New Zealand Mollusca. Some few illustrations for two papers published in the Transactions (vols. 51, 53) were prepared for Miss Mestayer with portion of the grant, but for the last two years she has reported that no work has been done.

Dr. C. A. Cotton in 1915 was granted £15 towards an investigation of the physiographic features of the New Zealand coast, but as he obtained a grant from another source he surrendered this grant.

Property-list.

The following is a list of apparatus purchased by the aid of a grant from the Research Fund and in use by the various grantees. When a research is completed the apparatus used in the research is returned to the Institute for use by future research workers.

In the possession of the Institute at present are the following: One block plane, cost 9s.; one camera, £15; one tcnon saw, 4s. 6d.

At present in hands of research grantees: Aerial insulators, cost £4 4s.; aircondensors, £12 8s.; altitude and azimuth instrument, £10; analytical balance, £36; ball mill, £23 12s. 9d.; castings, fittings, &c., for same, £56 15s. 8d.; “Big Ben” alarm clocks (2), £3 7s. 6d.; oages (animal), £3; camera, £1 11s.; chemical balance, £37; weights for same, £4 14s. 3d.; condensers, £1 17s. 11d.; Duddell thermogalvanometer, £41 4s.; electric furnace and fittings, £28 15s. 3d.; electric oven, £14 14s. 5d.; eye-piece, £2 16s. 8d.; Kjedahl apparatus, £1 15s.; micrometer eye-piece, £17 2s.; objective prism, £33; oxygen cylinder, ½8 c. ft., £4 15s. 6d.; photometer, £2 10s.; range-finder, £4; scales and electric motor, £5 10s.; sieve, 8s. 6d.; sphere, £25 15s.; soxhelet apparatus, £1 5s. 4d.; syringe (hypodermic), 6s. 6d.; telephones (one pair), £3 2s.; testing-vessel, porcelain insulators, £95; tide-predicting machine, £63 17s. 6d.; Van Slyke's apparatus, £15.

Publication Committee's Report.—Delay in publication of volume 54: A discussion took place on this delay, and a letter from the Hon. Editor, dated 25th January, 1924, was read. A message was received from Internal Affairs Department that the Government Printer has promised to do his utmost, if all papers are in his hands before the end of January, to have volume 55 published by the end of July, 1924.

On the motion of Mr. Morgan, seconded by Mr. Hudson, it was resolved, That the printing of the Transactions for the two years 1922 and 1923 in one volume, No. 55, be entrusted to the Government Printer.

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Publication Committee's Report.

At the tim of making this report (19th December, 1923) volume 54 is still unpublished. The early session of 1923 began just before the concluding portion of the volume was finished, and since then one vexatious delay and another has put it off. It was promised by the 14th December, and that date appears on the cover; but work in connection with the British Empire Exhibition, and other work, has again put it off, and it is now promised first thing after the New Year holidays.

The committee has done what it could to expedite the issue of the volume, and can only suggest that the Institute urge the Hon. the Minister to instruct the Printer that the volume is in future to be printed more expeditiously. Details of papers accepted appear in last year's report; it may be added here that the volume consists of xxx plus 920 pages (of which the index comprises 49 pages), 85 plates, and numerous text-figures.

Proceedings of the various societies have not been included; societies failed to send details—some of papers read, some of officers elected; one sent no report at all: moreover, several of the societies print and distribute their own annual report in their own form, and as this printed report is the one sent for insertion in the Transactions it was thought unnecessary to duplicate the information.

The text and illustrations of the papers for the following volume (55) are already in the printer's hands. Forty papers by twenty-seven authors were submitted for publication, but owing to certain authors declining to make suggested alterations, these were reduced to twenty-six papers by twenty-one authors.

These papers will make quite a small volume; and the committee would like to suggest that, as the papers for what would be volume 56 will be in hand by the New Year, the papers for the two years be printed in one volume. This would mean that before the end of 1924 finances will be sound, and publications will have been caught up.

Part 8 (the final) of Bulletin No. 1 was issued during the year, and Dixon's mosses would also have been issued but for the fact that the plate had been lost by the printer. A new one was obtained, and the bulletin will be out early in the year.

For the Committee.

Johannes C. Andersen.

Pan-Pacific Congress.—Report was received. It was resolved, on the motion of the President, That the incoming President be the Institute's representative on the Pan-Pacific Congress Committee.

Report of Pan-Pacific Science Congress.

The second Pan-Pacific Science Congress, to which Dr. Allan Thomson, Dr. P. Marshall, and I had the honour to be the Institute's delegates, opened its Melbourne session on the 13th August, and its Sydney session on the 23rd, concluding there on the 3rd September. In Melbourne the session was opened by the Governor-General, His Excellency the Right Honourable Henry W. B. Forster, and in Sydney by the State Governor, His Excellency Sir William Davidson. The addresses of both were masterly, sympathetic, and cordial. That of Sir William Davidson in particular was eminently classical, and it has still the mournful consideration for us that it was the last public address that he gave. By his death shortly after the Congress concluded science lost a friend and humanity a servant of magnificent gifts and splendid devotion.

The Congress was attended by eminent men from every country that has a Pacific coast, except South American countries, and by eminent men from Britain. Its proceedings were marked by keen devotion to work, and by the great number of important questions that were considered. Its fine effects will be lifelong on many of the delegates and on many of the members of the Australian public. There was, indeed, the keenest interest manifested by the public in all the proceedings. Amount the minor advantages may be mentioned the feeling of attraction that was felt and freely expressed by great numbers of overseas delegates for Australia and for the Australian people, and the determination of many of them to revisit it. From this some even material advantage will result to Australia from the liberal subsidy that made the holding of the Congress possible.

Among the general decisions of the Congress was one for the setting-up of an Organization Committee, consisting of representatives of the various Pacific countries and of Great Britain. It falls to the Institute to elect the New Zealand representative.

On the invitation of the delegates from Japan, the next Congress will be held in that country, in 1926.

H. B. Kirk.

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Tongariro National Park.—Report was received. On the motion of Dr. Cockayne, seconded by Dr. Allan Thomson, it was resolved, That this Board strongly opposes the planting of heather on any part of the Tongariro National Park, or any other national park or scenic reserve.

On the motion of Mr. Hill, seconded by Dr. Marshall, it was resolved to urge that no leasing of any portion of the National Park be allowed.

Report of Tongariro National Park Board.

As the ex officio representative of the Institute on the Tongariro National Park Board, I enclose for the information of the Board of Governors a copy of the report to Parliament.

There are certain matters of policy in connection with the administration of the park on which I think the Institute should come to a conclusion for the guidance of its representative.

A proposal came before the Park Board at its first meeting to lease certain portions of the park for the erection of summer residences. I considered it my duty to oppose this proposal. A conclusion on the matter has not yet been come to.

When the Board was constituted a license was found to be held by the Prisons Department to cut timber on a certain defined area on Hauhangatahi, then brought within the boundaries of the park. The Board was faced with the difficulty of making roads, and of meeting other expenditure, with no settled revenue. It decided to renew the license under strict conditions as to selective logging, and to accept in payment the making of roads by prison labour. It is, I think, desirable that the Institute should lay down, for guidance of its representative, the principle that milling within the park should absolutely cease at the earliest possible date.

Heather has been planted widely on certain of the open portions of the park. When the Park Board was constituted a considerable quantity of heather-seed was on its way from Britain, purchased at the expense of the Robert Bruce Trust. The trustees have given the park £1,000 as a donation to its general fund, with a prospect of a further donation. The Board has given permission for the planting of the seed that was already on the way, and has decided to consider the whole matter before any further planting is allowed. If the Institute decides that it is opposed to the planting of exotics the action of its representative should be firm and decided, but he will need all the tact he may possess.

H. B. Kirk.

Carter Bequest.—A deputation, consisting of Sir Robert Stout, Dr. Newman, Mr. Wright (Mayor of Wellington), Mr. J. P. Maxwell, Mr. Darling, Dr. C. E. Adams, Mr. Berry, Professor Sommerville, and others, waited on the Board with a proposal that the Board should grant £3,000 out of the Carter Fund for the purpose of erecting a building on the site donated by the City Council to house the Meanee 9 in. telescope, which had been recently purchased by the Council for £500, and was now valued at £2,000. Dr. Newman, who introduced the deputation, informed the Board that the Wellington Philosophical Society would be willing to pay the costs of both sides of any friendly action in the Supreme Court to determine the power of the Institute in the matter. Sir Robert Stout also briefly supported Dr. Newman's application. He considered the suggestion that the Institute should become the owners and managers of the telescope and site would produce responsibilities which were outside the functions of the New Zealand Institute.

After the deputation had withdrawn Mr. Eliott moved, and Mr. Wright seconded, and it was carried, That the resolution passed in January, 1923, relating to using £2,000 of the Carter Bequest for assisting the erection of an observatory, be rescinded.

After considerable discussion the following motion, moved by the President, and seconded by the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. Eliott, was carried: That, provided (a) all legal difficulties be removed, (b) the tenure of the site be assured to the Institute, (c) the City Council donate the municipal

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teiescope to the Institute as trustees of the Carter Fund, there be built a Carter Memorial Observatory at the expense of the Carter Fund; that the observatory be under the control of the New Zealand Institute, exercised through a joint committee of the Institute and the Wellington City Council and the Astronomical Section of the Wellington Philosophical Society; that not more than £3,000 be spent on the building of the observatory, the remainder of the Carter Fund being allowed to accumulate till it is sufficient to found a professorship of astronomy; further, that the Standing Committee be empowered to take such action as may be necessary to carry out these resolutions.

The Hon. Librarian's Report and the Library Agreement were received and adopted.

Hon. Librarian's Report.

At the time of the last annual meeting the books had been removed to Victoria University College, and a beginning had been made to sort them from the hopelessly confused masses that covered the floor. That work was continued throughout the summer recess, and by the end of February the rough sorting was completed and shelving could begin. As it then became impossible to give much of my own time to the work, outside assistance was obtained. On the 6th June, while still huge piles of roughly sorted books lay upon the floor, and an immense amount of heavy work remained to be done, Miss Wood came up to the college, bringing with her the office requisites, and the College became the headquarters of the Institute. The remainder of the work Miss Wood completed practically without aid, she showing a competent energy and determination that deserve special recognition by the Institute. The present position may be stated thus: the books are on the shelves as far as the amount of shelving at present available will permit, and the library has been in working-order since August. Complete cataloguing has still to be done, with the careful examination that this will involve in order to discover what gaps in series exist and with the correspondence necessary to fill those gaps.

The books are, for the most part, on shelving provided by the College; and it seems certain that the amount of shelving taken up to the College by the Institute is considerably less than the amount that it is already using. In terms of its agreement the Institute has to provide for the College an equal amount.

The shelving taken to the college was taken by permission of the Department of Internal Affairs, and the Institute is indebted to Mr. Hislop for the considerate recommendation that made this possible. It is indebted to him also for the kindest assistance in allowing the books to be removed in the Department's motor-van. In consequence of the decision of the Wellington Philosophical Society not to allow its books to leave the Museum, it was necessary to determine ownership, a very difficult task in some cases. This task was undertaken by a joint committee, on which the Institute's representatives were Mr. Aston and Professor Cotton. They had to spend a great deal of time in this difficult work, and they did the work well.

H. B. Kirk, Hon. Librarian.

Libraby Agreement.

Memorandum of the terms under which the library of the New Zealand Institute (hereinafter referred to as the Institute), formerly housed at the Dominion Museum, Wellington, and to be now sent to Victoria University College, Wellington (hereinafter referred to as the College), is to be retained at the College.

The said library of the Institute, including all additions which in the future may be made thereto (hereinafter called “the library”) is to be forwarded to the College at the sole expense for carriage of the Institute, and to remain at Victoria University College building until either the Board of Governors of the Institute or the Council of the College determine that this arrangement shall be ended and give at least twelve calendar months' notice to that effect to the other body, when the library shall with all convenient speed be removed by the Institute at its sole expense.

The Institute shall forthwith supply shelving which shall be sufficient to accommodate the library. This shall be erected at the College at the expense of the Institute, and may be adapted and used as found necessary for the purposes of the College.

The Assistant Secretary of the Institute shall be a half-time member of the library staff of the College, and shall accordingly attend at the College library for at least half

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of his or her working-time. He or she shall be paid by the Institute, but shall during his or her attendance, as above mentioned, at the College be under the direction of the librarian of the College.

The works now included in the library are all properly stamped with the name of the Institute or otherwise identified, and all additions thereto shall be similarly stamped or identified by the Institute at its expense.

The library shall be properly shelved at the College, but not necessarily kept separate from the works in the College library.

The library is to remain the property of the Institute, but shall be under the control of the Council of the College or its nominees so long as it remains in the College building.

The library shall be available for use by members of the Institute at all times at which the College library is open to students of the College, and at such other reasonable times as the Institute may wish, provided that at these times the books are issued by the assistant provided by the Institute, or by some other person whose responsibility is recognized by the Institute and by the College. Books that are the property of the College may not be issued at these other times. The College may set aside any works in the library of which there are duplicates in the College library, except such sets as may be loaned by the Institute to the Dominion Museum, and store same in the College building. In the case of duplicates stored by the College the rights of members of the Institute shall extend to the copies in the College library.

The Institute will at its own expense bind all magazines at present unbound, proceeding with this work at a reasonable rate. The Institute will also at its own expense and at proper intervals bind all magazines hereinafter added to the library which may reasonably require binding, and will at its own expense effect all necessary repairs to the volumes of the library.

The library may be used by the staff and students of the College.

Members of the New Zealand Institùte shall have the same privileges with the Institute's own books as members of the College staff have at the present time with regard to the books belonging to the College library, except that access to the library shall only be at such times as it is officially open. In addition, members of the Institute shall, on application to the Secre'ary of the Institute, be entitled to receive library cards giving them readers' privileges, as under the Victoria University College Library Regulations 5 (C), p. 65, Calendar 1922.

Books in the library belonging to the New Zealand Institute may be posted on loan to members of the Institute at the expense of the Institute.

The library shall be insured against fire by the Institute, which shall pay all insurance premiums.

The College shall take all reasonable care of the library, but will not be responsible for any loss or damage to same.

Dated this 5th day of February, 1923.

For the Victoria University College: P. Levi, Chairman of Council. For the New Zealand Institute:

H. B. Kirk, President.

Samoan Observatory Committee.—The report was received and adopted. The following motion, proposed by Dr. Farr and seconded by Dr. Marshall, was carried: That this Institute, being apprised of the benefit accruing to the Samoan Geophysical Observatory from the setting-up of an advisory board of scientists, recommends that the Government should constitute the same committee as an advisory board on all geophysical and astronomical observatories in New Zealand.

Report of the Samoan Observatory Committee.

I have to state that the co-operation of the four members of the Institute on the above committee with the Government representatives has proceeded smoothly and with excellent results. There is reason to believe that, acting on the advice of the committee, the Department of External Affairs has conducted the Observatory at Samoa in a manner worthy of New Zealand, and satisfactory in every way from a scientific point of view.

The committee receives and comments on the annual report of the Director, and advises the External Affairs Department as to the way in which the money should be spent. The Department of External Affairs has shown a commendable, progressive

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and scientific spirit in the way it has treated and assisted the deliberations of the committee.

The committee has regularly met, and has arranged for the publications of the Observatory as well as scientific working.

E. Marsden.

Committee on Cataloguing Scientific Periodicals.—The report was received and adopted. On the motion of Dr. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Chilton, it was resolved, That the card catalogue of scientific periodicals should be the property of the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury.

Report of the Committee on the Catalogue of Scientific Periodicals.

The last list of periodicals was received a few weeks ago: all entries have now been transferred to a card catalogue. I hope to return from the Chatham Islands sufficiently early in January to enable me to have the manuscript ready by the end of the month.

The reference list will necessarily contain the information in the briefest form, but the card catalogue contains all the relative information supplied to me. It is suggested that libraries desiring a copy of this may obtain a set by paying the cost of the cards and copying, which should be done locally; while the present card catalogue should in fairness belong to the Canterbury Philosophical Institute, which was the instigator of the proposal and whose members have assisted me in its preparation.

Gilrert Archey,
Hon. Editor, Reference List of Periodicals.

Great Barrier Reef Committee.—The report was received and adopted.

Report of the Great Barrier Reef Committee.

Since reporting last year the Great Barrier Reef Committee has met five times. The chief business transacted was as follows:—

(1.)

Suggestions for the investigation of the New Guinea region of the reef were received from Mr. E. R. Stanley.

(2.)

A letter was received from the Director, British Museum (Natural History), London, stating that Dr. W. T. Calman had been appointed to keep in touch with the activities of the committee, and giving many suggestions for carrying out work on the reef.

(3.)

Professor H. C. Richards and Mr. C. Hedley explored the reef between Cairns and Thursday Island, and submitted a report on the work done. Further results of their trip will appear through the usual scientific channels.

(4.)

A special meeting, attended by several overseas delegates to the Pan-Pacific Science Congress, was held on s.s. “Relief,” on the 18th September, 1923, and a programme of investigations was discussed. This was on the occasion of the expedition to the reef of delegates to the Pan-Pacific Science Congress, after the close of the Sydney session.

W. R. B. Oliver,
New Zealand Institute Representative on Committee.

Fellowship Election.—It was resolved that the number of Fellows to be elected in 1925 be two. A ballot for the election of two Fellows for 1924 resulted in the election of Dr. R. J. Tillyard and Mr. H. Guthrie-Smith.

Hector Prize.—On the motion of Dr. Farr, seconded by Dr. Chilton, it was resolved, That a committee, consisting of the retiring President, the President-elect, and the Hon. Treasurer, be elected to look into the trust deeds of the Hector Memorial Prize and report on the general powers of the Board at next meeting. It was resolved that the amount of the Hector Prize for 1924 be £45.

Honorary Members.—A ballot for the election of three honorary members resulted in the election of Dr. Charles Chree, Mr. Charles Hedley, and Professor Einstein. On the motion of Dr. Thomson, seconded by Professor Kirk, it was resolved, That the Publication Committee be directed to

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publish the list of honorary members in alphabetical order, with the date of election following the name. One vacancy declared: The vacancy caused by the death of Professor Bayley Balfour was announced.

National Research Council.—On the motion of Dr. J. Allan Thomson, seconded by Dr. Cockayne, it was resolved, That this meeting, having considered the advisability of forming a National Research Council for New Zealand, is of the opinion that this is unnecessary, since the New Zealand Institute already performs those functions for New Zealand for which National Research Councils have been set up in other countries.

On the motion of Dr. Farr, seconded by Mr. Hill, it was resolved, That the Standing Committee consider how far the functions of the National Research Councils elsewhere are at present fulfilled by the New Zealand Institute.

Building Fund.—On the motion of Mr. Aston, seconded by Professor Kirk, it was resolved, That this meeting affirms the desirableness of establishing a Building Fund to provide for a building in which to house the property of the Institute, and to hold meetings, and for other purposes.

Carter Legacy.—It was resolved, That the Standing Committee inquire further into the matter of £50 retained by the Public Trustee for erection of a brick room for housing the Carter Library.

Science Congress.—On the motion of the Hon. Mr. G. M. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Malcolm, it was resolved, That the next New Zealand Science Congress be held in Dunedin, in the beginning of 1926.

Dominion Museum.—On the motion of the Hon. Mr. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved, That the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute urge upon the Government the advisability of placing the Dominion Museum under the management of a Board of Trustees.

Election of Officers.—President, Dr. P. Marshall; Hon. Secretary, Mr. B. C. Aston; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. M. A. Eliott; Hon. Librarian, Professor Kirk; Hon. Editor, Mr. J. C. Andersen; Hon. Returning Officer, Professor Segar; Managers of Trust Funds, Hon. Secretary and Hon. Treasurer.

Election of Committees.—Research Committee: Mr. B. C. Aston, Professor Evans, Mr. Furkert, and Mr. P. G. Morgan.

Publication Committee: Dr. Cotton, Mr. J. C. Andersen, Professor Marsden, Mr. Aston, and Mr. G. V. Hudson.

Library Committee: Professor Kirk, Professor Sommerville, Dr. Thomson, and Dr. Cotton.

Hector Award Committee: Professor Easterfield and Professor Robertson.

Date and Place of next Annual Meeting.—To be held in last week of January, 1925. Exact date and place to be fixed by the Standing Committee.

Votes of Thanks.—A vote of thanks was passed to the Press for their attendance, to Victoria College Council for the use of the room, and to Professor Kirk, who provided the excellent afternoon tea. This was carried by acclamation. A vote of thanks was also passed to the honorary officers of the Institute for their work during the past year.