Go to National Library of New Zealand Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa
Volume 56, 1926
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Host Plants and Habitat.

It is usually swept from grasses and rushes. One specimen was taken in a house. Hibernating adults have been found under bark of blue-gum (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.).

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Fig. 1.—Grove of mamaku (Cyathea medullaris).
Fig. 2.—Rushes, or wiwi (Juncus ejfusus), in pasture.

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Figs. 1–3.—Arocatus rusticus: 1, first instar; 2, third (?) instar; 3, fourth instar.
Figs. 4–5.—Orthoea nigriceps: 4, intermediate instar; 5, fifth instar.
Fig. 6.—Margareta dominica: intermediate instar.

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Fig. 1.—Clenoneurus hochstetteri: second instar.
Figs. 2–5—Aneurus brouni: 2, second instar; 3, third instar; 4, fourth instar; 5, fifth instar.
Figs. 6–7.—Cermatulus nasahs: 6, first (?) instar; 7, second instar.

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Fig. 1.—Cermatulus nasalis: eggs.
Fig. 2.—Zangis amyoti. egg-shells.
Fig. 3.—Dictyotus caenosus: eggs.

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Figs. 1–3.—Zangis amyoti: 1, first instar (KOH preparation); 2, second instar; 3, third instar (much less magnified).
Fig. 4.—Dictyotus caenosus: first instar.
Fig 5.—Rhopahmorpha obscura: second instar.

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Fig. 1.—Rhopalimorpha obscura intermediate instar.
Figs. 2–3.—Oncacontias vittatus 2, second instar; 3, third instar.