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Volume 56, 1926
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(2.) Two Half-meshes.

This method presents a much neater appearance than the former one. In fig. 33, instead of carrying the netting-strip from the loop A to the loop B to make one complete mesh, as in the ordinary routine, this mesh-space is divided up into two. The strip, after making the netting-knot at A, is carried up over the netting-knot of the row above at X. The loop formed is gauged to the same level as the previous loop. The strip is carried down to the level of the lower ends of the loops of the last row at A, B. At this point, Y, the ascending and descending limbs of the netting-strip are held with the left finger and thumb whilst an overhand

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Fig. 1.—Scoop-net for kahawai: beach at mouth of Waiapu River. (See p. 620.)
Fig. 2.—Net-commencement: closed loops on supporting stand; author gauging mesh.

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Fig. 1.—Scoop-net for kehe: note au, for threading fish, in right hand. (See p 612)
Fig. 2.—Kehe fishers on Whareponga beach: in pairs—one with net, the other with kōkō pole (See p 616)

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Fig. 1.—Bag-net for crayfish, crab shows bait-site (See p. 626)
Fig. 2.—Bag-net with forked handle for tangahangaha (See p. 630)

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Fig. 1.—Matarau net: upper eight radiating lines support the hoop; lower four are for bait. (See p. 632.)
Fig. 2.—Large matarau net for maomao, used off Lotin Point. (See p. 631)

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Fig. 1.—Hinaki purangi. trap and leading-net in one. (See p. 640.)
Fig. 2.—Hinaki purangi: small end where net is commenced. Loop of flax tied when net is set, and untied to extract catch. (See p. 641.)

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Fig. 1.—Attaching a leading-net to an eel-trap (hinaki). (See p. 639.)
Fig. 2.—Hinaki with leading-net set in weir, Waiapu River. (See p. 642.)

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Fig. 1.—Side view of hinaki purangi, set in Waiapu River. (See p. 641.)
Fig. 2.—Looking down into above hinaki purangi. Note brushwood arms of weir. (See p. 641.)

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Fig. 1.—Landing-net for warehou. (See p. 623)
Fig. 2.—Torehe net being made: [supporting strand over foot; gauging-mesh on left. (See p. 643)

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Fig. 1.—Baited trap-net (torehe), showing radials, circumferential line, bait, and sinker at back. Locality, Te Araroa. (See p 642.)
Fig. 2.—Torehe net closed by pulling line, sinker gives the counter-pull. (See pp. 645646)

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Haua, or hinaki kehe. Locality, Te Kaha. (See p. 635)

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knot is made over both, as in the closed-loop commencement. The netting-strip is now looped over the next mesh, B, and after gauging the loop to the same level as mesh 1 the ordinary netting-knot is made at B. This completes the mesh 2 in fig. 34. Thus two meshes, 1 and 2, have taken the place between A and B that by the routine method would have been occupied by one mesh, and the row is thus increased by one.

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Figs. 33, 34.—Additional mesh (second method).