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Volume 56, 1926
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Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute.

Minutes Of The Annual Meeting Of The Board Of Governors.
27th January, 1925.

The annual meeting of the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute was held in Victoria University College on Tuesday, 27th January, 1925, at 10 a.m.

Present:—

President, Dr. P. Marshall (in the chair), and the following Governors :—
Representing the Government—Mr. B. C. Aston, Dr. Chas. Chilton, Dr. L. Cockayne, and Dr. J. Allan Thomson.
Representing Wellington Philosophical Society—Messrs. G. V. Hudson and P. G. Morgan.
Representing the Auckland Institute—Professors H. W. Segar and F. P. Worley.
Representing the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury—Professor C. Coleridge Farr and Mr. A. M. Wright.
Representing the Otago Institute—Professor J. Malcolm and Hon. G. M. Thomson, M.L.C.
Representing the Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute—Mr. H. Hill.
Representing the Nelson Institute—Professor T. H. Easterfield.
Representing the Manawatu Philosophical Society—Mr. M. A. Eliott.

Apologies for non-attendance were received from His Excellency the Governor-General and from the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs.

Roll-call.—The Hon. Secretary then announced the roll.

Notices of Motion.—These were received by the President, and discussion deferred until after the adjournment.

Presidential Address.—The President then read his presidential address. On the motion of Dr. Chilton, a vote of thanks to the President for his address was unanimously carried, and it was resolved to print the address in the annual volume.

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Incorporated Societies' Reports.—The annual reports and balance-sheets of the incorporated societies, as under, were received, and referred to the Hon. Treasurer and Hon. Secretary for consideration and report:—

Auckland Institute, for year ending 22nd February, 1924.
Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, for year ending 31st October, 1924.
Otago Institute, for year ending 30th November, 1924.
Wellington Philosophical Society, for year ending 30th September, 1924.
Nelson Institute, for year ending 31st October, 1924.
Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute, for year ending 31st December, 1924.
Manawatu Philosophical Society, for year ending 31st December, 1924.

The Wanganui Philosophical Society was the only society which failed to send in a report and balance-sheet.

Report of the Standing Committee.—The annual report of the Standing Committee was then read, and considered clause by clause, amended, and adopted.

The statement of the research grants for the year was approved.

Report of the Standing Committee of the New Zealand Institute for the Year ending 31st December, 1924.

Meetings.—Eight meetings of the Standing Committee have been held during the year, the attendance being as follows : Dr. Marshall (President), 7; Mr. G. V. Hudson, S; Mr. P. G. Morgan, 6; Dr. J. A. Thomson, 5; Hon. G. M. Thomson, 1; Professor C. C. Farr, 1; and Mr. B. C. Aston, 8.

Hector Award.—The award for 1923 was made to Dr. D. Petrie, on account of his pioneer investigations of the distribution of the plants of Otago and Stewart Island, which brought forth much information essential for New Zealand plant geography, together with his further botanical explorations in most parts of the North and South Islands carried out year by year since 1876, and his many contributions towards a more accurate knowledge of the flora of New Zealand.

At a meeting of the Council of the Auckland Institute held on the 3rd April the President, Mr. Gunson, Mayor of Auckland, presented the Hector prize and medal to Dr. Petrie.

Publications.—Transactions of the New Zealand Institute: Volume 54 (1921), after much delay, was received from the Government Printer on the 29th January, 1924. Volume 55, which is a combined volume for the years 1922 and 1923, was issued by the Government Printer on the 30th October, and sent out to societies and exchanges in November. Volume 54 was laid on the tables of the Legislative Council on the 3rd July, and the House of Representatives on the 16th July. Volume 55 was received too late to be presented last session.

Bulletins.—At present in the press is the last part of Dixon's Bulletin on the Bryology of New Zealand, authorized on the 10th October by the Standing Committee to be printed, at a cost of £80 for 500 copies. With the issue of this part Bulletins Nos. 1, 2, and 3 will be complete, and parts or complete sets may be obtained on application. Prices of the foregoing are quoted on the covers of the Transactions.

Exchange List.—During the year the following additions have been made to the exchange list: Voronesh University; Royal Technical University, Stockholm; La Société Botanique de Pologne; Real Sociedad Espanola de Historia Natural, Madrid; University of Missouri. A circular drawn up by the Exchange Committee and approved last year has also been sent to over two hundred institutions with a view to an exchange of publications, and from the replies so far received is meeting with very favourable consideration.

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Sales.—Some sets of Maori Art, partial sets of Transactions, and a few Bulletins have been disposed of, as well as a few sets of C. R. Carter's books, the latter being credited to the Carter Bequest Revenue Account.

Incorporated Societies' Reports and Balance-sheets.—The following reports and balance sheets have been received, and are now laid on the table :—

Auckland Institute, for year ending 22nd February, 1924.
Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, for year ending 31st October, 1924.
Nelson Institute, for year ending 31st October, 1924.
Otago Institute, for year ending 30th November, 1924.
Wellington Philosophical Society, for year ending 30th September, 1924.
Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute, for year ending 31st December, 1924.
Manawatu Philosophical Society, for year ending 31st December, 1924.

Fellowship, New Zealand Institute.—On the 6th March the election to the Fellowship of the New Zealand Institute of W. H. Guthrie-Smith, Esq., and Dr. R. J. Tillyard was gazetted. On the 8th April the incorporated societies were asked to forward nominations for filling the two vacancies for 1924. Ten nominations came to hand, and were submitted to the Fellows of the Institute for selection. On the 29th October the results of the selection were submitted to the Governors.

Carter Bequest.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 4th March it was resolved that a Carter Bequest Committee be set up to discuss the terms of the resolution carried by the Board of Governors on the 29th January relative to the Carter Bequest, the committee to consist of four members of the Institute, two Wellington City Councillors, and two members of the Astronomical Section of the Wellington Philosophical Society; the committee to report to the Standing Committee and the various bodies interested. The following were subsequently appointed to act on this committee :—

Representing the Institute—Dr. Marshall, Professor Kirk, Messrs. Eliott and Hudson.
Representing the City Council—Councillors Forsyth and Meadowcroft.
Representing the Astronomical Section—Drs. Hector and Adams.

The first meeting of this committee was held in Victoria College on the 8th April, when the following resolutions were passed :—

“That the City Council be asked to grant the New Zealand Institute a tenure in perpetuity, or as long as an astronomical observatory is erected upon it, of the site referred to in the Wellington City Empowering Act, 1922.”
“That Professor Kirk be asked to draft for the Chairman's approval and signature a letter to the Town Clerk setting forth the proposal of clause C * of the resolution carried at the annual meeting of the New Zealand Institute, 1923, and that a copy of the letter be sent to each Councillor; also that Professor Kirk, or the Chairman, be asked to attend before any committee of the Council that may consider the matter.”

A letter embodying the above resolutions was accordingly forwarded on the 26th April to the Town Clerk, and on the 28th April a copy of the same letter was sent to each of the City Councillors. On the 9th July the Town Clerk acknowledged receipt of the letter, stating that matters contained therein were under consideration, and that in the meantime the Meanee telescope had been handed over in trust to Dr. C. E. Adams, Government Astronomer, for setting up in a temporary building then being erected near the Observatory at Kelburn. No further communication has been received on the matter.

Storage of Stocks.—The Internal Affairs Department has kindly placed at the disposal of the Institute a room in the basement of the old Parliament Buildings, recently vacated by the Department, and most of the stocks of publications have already been transferred there. When these seventeen thousand volumes have been classified and placed on the shelving provided they will be in a much more convenient and satisfactory state than has prevailed for years, but the work is heavy and can be done only at intervals.

[Footnote] * Clause C referred to is as follows :—“That, provided the City Council donate the municipal telescope to the Institute as trustees of the Carter Fund, there be built a Carter Memorial Observatory at the expense of the Carter Fund; that the observatory be under the control of the New Zealand Institute, the Wellington City Council, and the Astronomical Section of the Wellington Philosophical Society.”

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Carter Library Legacy.—At last annual meeting the Standing Committee was asked to inquire further into the matter of the Carter legacy retained by the Public Trustee, and which was earning only 3 per cent. As 3 per cent. is the usual rate allowed on amounts at call, and as there was no possibility of the fund being utilized in the near future, on the 5th June the Standing Committee gave the Public Trustee an undertaking that the capital would not be required for five years, and the Public Trustee agreed to allow interest at the rate of 5 per cent.

Dominion Museum.—The resolution passed at last annual meeting was conveyed to the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs, and the outlook for a new building is decidedly brighter. Cabinet proposed to give a subsidy of £75,000 provided the citizens of Wellington raised a similar amount. Subsequently, on a proposal to include an art gallery with the Museum, the amount promised by the Government was raised to £100,000.

Research Grants.—As an outcome of a resolution of the Board at last meeting, a deputation waited upon the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs with regard to the re-establishment of the research-grant vote. The Hon. the Minister was sympathetic, and informed the deputation that the Institute would be agreeably surprised at the amount which he proposed to ask Cabinet to grant for this purpose. On the 13th March a communication was received from the Hon. the Minister intimating that £1,000 had been placed on the estimates for a research vote, to be administered by the Institute. On the 19th March the incorporated societies were advised by circular that this amount was available, and were asked to bring the matter before their members. Nineteen applications for grants were received, and ten of these were recommended to the Hon. the Minister for approval.

Catalogue of Scientific Journals.—Mr. Archey, who has the preparation of the catalogue in hand, during the year sent to all the scientific libraries in New Zealand a copy of the catalogue to be revised. When this revision is completed the catalogue can be finally typed or printed, and libraries may obtain a copy.

Binding.—During the year a complete set of the Institute's Transactions have been bound in brown buckram for the library, and the Standing Committee at its meeting on the 16th September agreed to the Library Committee's recommendation that up to £100 out of the special fund in hand be expended on binding the publications of the London Royal Society and £50 on New Zealand publications.

Finances of the Institute.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 6th September the Hon. Secretary submitted certain proposals which would result in placing the finances of the Institute on a more secure foundation. It was resolved to place the matter in the hands of the President and Hon. Secretary to report further.

National Research Council.—Arising out of a resolution carried by the Board at its last meeting, the President drew up the following report showing how the functions of National Research Councils elsewhere are at present fulfilled by the New Zealand Institute :—

“The object of a National Research Council is—(1) To co-ordinate national efforts in the different branches of science and its applications; (2) the investigation of a number of special problems by the aid of grants to investigators; (3) the encouragement and development of research by the organization of research workers.

“The number of research workers in New Zealand is necessarily small, and they are scattered. In each centre there is a society affiliated to the New Zealand Institute which meets regularly for the discussion of any scientific matters that are the subject of research of any of the members, who practically constitute all the scientific workers of the district. Representatives of these societies meet annually in Wellington, when they consider reports from the different societies. Those representatives that are available in Wellington constitute the Standing Committee, and meet regularly between the periods of the annual meetings and deal with any matters referred to them by the individual societies. This we believe is the most satisfactory way within the limits of the possibilities of the Dominion conditions to co-ordinate scientific research work in the country.

“The Standing Committee receives reports from the various affiliated societies of persons who are qualified and ready to undertake research of any kind. Where suggested research coincides with or duplicates work that has been undertaken elsewhere the society concerned is informed and necessary action is taken. Also, apparatus and material that has been used by one investigator whose work is completed is sent on to another who may require it.

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“The Standing Committee, after considering applications for grants from the various research workers, decides whether the subject of research and the applicant justify expenditure, and, if so, it allots a certain sum from the Government research grant which it considers sufficient to meet the expenses that are necessarily incurred in conducting the research.

“We consider that by acting in this way the Institute is in effect acting the part of a National Research Board for the Dominion.”

Tongariro National Park.—At last annual meeting the following resolutions—“That this Board strongly opposes the planting of heather on any part of the Tongariro National Park or any other scenic reserve”; and “That no leasing of any portion of the National Park be allowed”—were forwarded to the Hon. the Minister of Lands, who replied that he was forwarding them to the Chairman of the Tongariro National Park Board.

On the 10th October a letter was read from the Manawatu Philosophical Society protesting strongly against the introduction of any exotics into the park. On the 19th November a deputation organized by the Tararua Tramping Club waited upon the Minister of Lands and the Park Board to protest against heather and grouse being introduced into the park, and against the selection of the Haunted Whare site for the new hostel. Professor Kirk and Mr. G. V. Hudson represented the Institute on this deputation.

On the 18th November the Standing Committee passed the following resolution: “That in the opinion of the New Zealand Institute the Tongariro National Park should be absolutely reserved as a sanctuary for native plants and animals.”

Stewart Island.—A resolution passed at the annual meeting in January last, urging that the control of the animal-life on Stewart Island should be retained by the Government and should not be allowed to pass into the hands of any acclimatization society, was conveyed to the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs, and on the 30th April the Minister replied and asked for details as to how the Institute would suggest that its wishes could be carried out.

At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 5th June a sub-committee, consisting of Professor Kirk and Messrs. Oliver and H. Hamilton, was appointed to go into the matter. On the 19th December this committee sent in the following report, which was read at a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 23rd December, when it was resolved that the Hon. the Minister be replied to and given the recommendations of the committee :—

“The committee set up to consider the matter of protection of plant and animal life on Stewart Island reports as follows :—

“Nearly the whole of Stewart Island is Crown land, and is reserved either as scenic reserves or as forest reserves. It would appear, therefore, that the status, from the point of view of the Institute, is not unsatisfactory, although an improvement would perhaps be effected if the whole of the Crown lands on the island were declared a permanent forest reserve.

“The correspondence shows that deer are present in numbers. It is in the interests of the country, and especially in the interests of the State Forest Service, that they should be exterminated. They not only kill trees, but they keep down the undergrowth and prevent regeneration, thus setting a limit to the life of the forest.

“Experience shows that it will probably be extremely difficult to get the seriousness of the position recognized by the Government. Pending decisive action by the Government, the committee recommends that Government regulation should make it a serious offence for any one licensed to shoot on a reserve, on Stewart Island or elsewhere, to have on the reserve a fowling-piece or any rifled firearm with a bore less than .303. In the absence of fowling-pieces and pea-rifles, the destruction of bird-life would be much lessened.

“As such a regulation as that just referred to would probably not be binding on the Maori on mutton-birding expeditions, it is suggested that the Institute should draw up and circulate among the Maori of Stewart Island and elsewhere a statement of the main facts, and an appeal for the native plants and animals.

“Signed on behalf of the committee.

H. B. Kirk.”

Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science.—On the 2nd August the Standing Committee appointed Professor Sommerville and Mr. A. M. Wright to represent the Institute at the Adelaide meeting of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science, and is was resolved to ask those delegates to report on the proposals for widening the functions of the association as submitted by the General Secretary of the association.

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On the 17th September the following report was received from Professor Sommerville and Mr. Wright :—

“The matter contained in the circular issued by the permanent Secretary of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science relating to the proposed widening of the functions of the association was brought up at a meeting of the Council in Adelaide, and the following committee was appointed to inquire and report on the suggestions: Sir George Knibbs, Sir John Monash, Sir Baldwin Spencer, Mr. Andrews, Mr. L. Keith Ward, and Dr. H. C. Richards.

“Other resolutions of interest which were passed are as follows :—

“(1.)

In future Vice-Presidents of the association shall consist of members domiciled in Australia or New Zealand, with the exception of the founder, Professor Liversidge.

“(2.)

Professor H. B. Kirk was appointed joint Local Secretary for New Zealand with Professor C. Coleridge Farr.

“(3.)

The Mueller Medal was awarded to Mr. Andrew Gibb Maitland for his eminent services in the cause of geology.

“(4.)

The places and dates for the next two meetings were decided as follows: August, 1926, Perth; January, 1928, Hobart.

“(5.)

Sir Thomas Lyle was appointed President for the meeting in 1926.

“(6.)

The proposal, received at the last meeting at the instance of the Department of Internal Affairs of New Zealand, that the name of the association be changed to the ‘Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science’ was negatived, but it was resolved that future correspondence paper of the association should have the words ‘Australia and New Zealand’ inscribed on it, in brackets, underneath the present title.”

Scientific Visits to Pacific Islands.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 23rd December the following letter was received :—

“The Hon. Secretary, New Zealand Institute.

Dear Sir,—

“In 1924 the Minister of Defence extended to New Zealand scientists, on application of the Board of Science and Art, the privilege of travelling between various Pacific islands on H.M.S. ‘Veronica’ and ‘Laburnum,’ the cruises of which take place from June to October. The Minister now advises that similar facilities will be accorded to approved scientists on future occasions whenever the exigencies of the service will permit. No cabin accommodation is, as a rule, available in His Majesty's ships, and the total number to be accommodated should not exceed four persons.

“Applications for accommodation should be forwarded not later than the middle of March, annually, as it is necessary to arrange the itinerary of His Majesty's ships to the islands of the South Pacific by the end of the month.

“Yours faithfully,

J. Allan Thomson,

“Secretary, Board of Science and Art.”

Resolutions not otherwise mentioned in the Report.

1.

On the 4th March it was resolved that the price of Bulletin No. 3, part 3, be 3s. 6d. to members and 4s. to non-members.

2.

On the 5th June it was resolved to grant Mr. Dixon fifty extra copies of his Bulletin No. 3, part 3.

3.

On the 16th September it was resolved to discontinue printing the Roll of Honour in the Transactions.

4.

On the 18th November it was resolved that the price of back numbers of the Transactions to booksellers be the same as that to non-members, and that no discount be allowed. (See resolution of annual meeting.)

Arising out of the Standing Committee's report :—

National Research Council.—Proposed by Dr. J. A. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Chilton, and carried, That the President be requested to communicate with the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science, the Pan-Pacific Congress, the National Research Councils of Australia, America, and Japan, and other similar bodies, informing them that the New Zealand Institute carries out the functions of the National Research Council for New Zealand.

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Stewart Island Sanctuaries.—Proposed by Dr. Cockayne, seconded by Professor Segar, and carried, That a committee be set up to suggest to the Standing Committee, who shall have power to act, the setting-aside of more scenic reserves in Stewart Island.

Publications Committee.—Proposed by Dr. J. A. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Cockayne, and carried, That the Standing Committee, with the addition of the Hon. Editor, be the Publications Committee.

Tongariro National Park.—The President read his report on the Tongariro National Park Board.

Report of Tongariro National Park Board.

The Board has held the customary quarterly meetings during the year, and much discussion has taken place in regard to the site of the proposed hostel. The Board decided on the Haunted Whare site.

A road has been cleared through the tongue of bush between the Haunted Whare and Whakapapa huts.

The Prisons Department is still cutting timber on the south slopes of Hauhangatahi. They are restricted to those trees that have been previously marked. Care is taken to prevent fire.

The liberation of grouse was done without previous authority from the Board. As your representative, I moved at the last meeting, “That this Board regards the Tongariro National Park as an absolute sanctuary for New Zealand fauna and flora.” An amendment was moved to the effect that no exotic plants or animals were to be introduced without previous authority of the Board. The amendment was carried by a narrow majority. This perhaps is an improvement on the previous position, though I think the present state of affairs is not satisfactory to those who wish the park to maintain its distinct national character. This I fancy is the wish of all nature-lovers and of many others who have a general national interest.

P. Marshall,

President, New Zealand Institute.

On the motion of Dr. Chilton, it was resolved, That the report be received, and the President thanked for it.

On the motion of Professor Easterfield, seconded by Mr. Hill, it was resolved, That this meeting of the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute, containing delegates from all the scientific societies in New Zealand, unanimously protests against the introduction of any plants and animals other than natives of New Zealand into the Tongariro National Park.

Great Barrier Reef Committee's Report.—This report was received, and on the motion of Dr. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Cockayne, it was resolved, That Mr. Oliver be thanked for his report, and reappointed the Institute's representative on the Great Barrier Reef Committee.

Report of Great Barrier Reef Committee.

The operations for the past year include twelve meetings of the committee.

Reports were received from Commander Maxwell, R.N., on soundings in the reef region, and from Mr. H. Tyron, Queensland Government Entomologist, on the economic products of the reef.

Mr. Charles Hedley was appointed full-time Scientific Director to the committee from the 1st April, 1924, at a salary of £500 per annum. A plan for the future work was submitted by Mr. Hedley, and his suggestions were adopted by the committee.

The publications of the committee during the year include the following papers: “Geological Reconnaisance in Northern Queensland”; “Emergence at Holbourne Island”; “Natural Destruction of a Coral Reef”; “Temperature Observations at Wallis Island.”

The Scientific Director has reported on the following subjects: “A Raised Beach at the North Barnard Islands”; Coral Shingle as a Beach Formation”; “The Townsville Plain”; “An Opacity-meter.”

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Boring proposals submitted by Professor Richards have been circulated to members of the committee and to various geologists for comments and suggestions.

Financial statement shows—Receipts, £2,317 Os. 5d.; expenditure, £453 17s. 10d.: balance in hand, £1,863 2s. 7d.

W. R. B. Oliver,

New Zealand Institute Representative on the committee.

Dominion Museum and Art Gallery.—On the motion of Dr. Chilton, seconded by Professor Worley, it was resolved, That the Government be urged to bring in a Bill placing the control of the Dominion Museum and Art Gallery in the hands of a Board of Trustees.

Pan-Pacific Food Congress.—This report, by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, was read and received.

Pan-Pacific Food Congress, Honolulu: Report by G. M. Thomson.

As an outcome of my visit to Honolulu in July-September of last year as New Zealand delegate to the Pan-Pacific Food Conservation Congress, two matters of scientific importance outside the scope of the conference arrested my attention, and I desire to ask the co-operation of the New Zealand Institute in urging these upon the notice of the Government.

The question of establishing a vulcanological observatory in the North Island of New Zealand has been under consideration for the past four or five years, but so far no definite action has been taken. I recently revived the subject in a letter to the Minister of Internal Affairs, dated 8th November, 1924. A copy of this is filed in the Dominion Museum. The latest proposal is a resolution of the New Zealand Board of Science and Art, passed at its meeting of 3rd October, 1924, as follows :—

“That, in view of the fact that the geological structure of the thermal regions is still very imperfectly known, the committee consider that the first step towards a permanent vulcanological observatory should be the appointment of a full-time research officer to make geological and vulcanological observations for a period of two years under the direction of the Board. The committee recommend that the officer should be appointed by the Board, at a salary of £400, be furnished with a motor-car, and receive mileage expenses.”

I suggest that the Institute at its annual meeting should support this proposal, and ask the Government to take action at as early a date as possible.

The second matter is the desirability of fitting the vessels of the New Zealand naval and marine services with sonic depth-finders, and is embodied in a letter to the Minister of Marine. The importance of this subject is twofold. First, in view of the development of a Fishery Department, which the Government is now undertaking, it is very desirable that a detailed survey of the costal region within the 100-fathom line should be undertaken. This could be done by the smaller vessels of the service—e.g., the “Veronica” and the “Laburnum,” and also the “Tutanekai.” Ultimately, contour maps of the whole area could be prepared. Secondly, if the larger vessels of the naval service—e.g., H.M.S. “Dunedin”—were fitted with sonic depth-finders, it would be possible to obtain a complete bathymetrical survey of the deep fissure which lies approximately along the line between the volcanic region of the North Island of New Zealand and the Islands of the Tongan and Somoan groups. Information on this matter would be most valuable in connection with the work of the volcano observatory. The United States Navy would probably supplement this work later by a similar survey of the line between Samoa and Hawaii.

The Council of the Institute would be furthering a great Imperial as well as international scientific research if it succeeded in moving the New Zealand Government to take action in these two directions, and I have therefore much pleasure in suggesting that it give the whole subject its fullest consideration.

Geo. M. Thomson.

Sonic Depth-finders.—The following resolution, proposed by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Chilton, was carried: That the Government be urged to furnish vessels of the New Zealand Naval Service with sonic depth-finders to enable them to carry out a bathymetrical survey of the seas round New Zealand and of the deep-sea area between New Zealand and Samoa.

Geological and Vulcanological Research.—On the motion of the Hon. G. M. Thomson, seconded by Professor Easterfield, it was resolved, That

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the Government be asked to give effect to the recommendations of the Science and Art Board that a full-time research officer should be appointed to make geological and vulcanological observations in the volcanic region of the North Island.

Price of Transactions.—On the motion of Dr. Cockayne, seconded by Dr. Thomson, it was resolved, That volumes of the Transactions of which there is a sufficient stock, as quoted on the cover of the volumes at 5s. per volume to non-members, be sold to booksellers at 3s. 6d. per volume.

Publications Committee's Report.—The report was read and received. A special vote of thanks was unanimously accorded to the Hon. Editor for his labours during the year.

Report of Publications Committee.

The volume for the two years ending 31st December, 1923, was issued in one volume of 18 + 884 pages (of which 157 pages were Proceedings and Appendix), with 71 plates (one coloured), and the usual illustrative text-figures. The volume contains sixty-one papers by forty-two authors, the papers for the two years being kept separate. The publications of the Institute are now up to date, a further instalment of Dixon's “Mosses” received during the year being in the hands of the printer.

Owing to a notice sent to the affiliated societies informing them that the rule that no papers received after the 31st December would appear in the current volume, most of the papers were sent immediately after reading, so that preparation of Volume 56 is already well in hand, and it is hoped that it will be issued in the first half of 1925.

For the committee.

Johannes C. Andersen.

Hon. Librarian's Report.—This report was read and received. It was resolved to accept Professor Kirk's resignation with regret.

Report of Hon. Librarian.

The Institute did me the honour to appoint me Honorary Librarian. I wish I could make a report that would show that I had proved worthy of the honour, but I cannot. All the good work that has been done in the library has been done by Miss Wood, who has shown herself very zealous and competent. I have done nothing. I had a great many good intentions—so many that the Board, if it knew of them all, would naturally conclude that I had spent the year in preparing a motor-road to my final destination. If I could get time for the important work of the library I should be glad to continue in office, but I cannot. I ask, therefore, that the Board will appoint some one that can and will.

H. B. Kirk.

Hon. Treasurer's Report.—This report was read and received, and the following statements, duly audited by the Auditor-General, were adopted :—

(a.)

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure.

(b.)

Statement of Assets and Liabilities.

(c.)

Statement of Research Grants.

(d.)

Statement of Carter Bequest.

(e.)

Statement of Hector Memorial Fund.

(f.)

Statement of Hutton Memorial Fund.

(g.)

Statement of Hamilton Memorial Fund.

On the motion of Dr. Marshall, seconded by Professor Worley, the following resolution was carried: That the annual grant received by the New Zealand Institute from the Government is entirely inadequate for the requirements of the Institute, being no more than the salary of many a Government official. Owing to the increase in the work of the Institute and to the very large increase in the cost of publishing the Transactions, the Institute is less liberally treated at the present time than it was forty years ago. The Board of Governors believes that the Government cannot be aware of the disabilities under which the New Zealand Institute is

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labouring, or of the importance of the work being carried out by the Institute, and hereby resolves that a committee of the Board shall wait upon the Hon. the Minister of Internal Affairs and request that the annual grant be increased to £2,000.

It was resolved that the President and Messrs. Aston, Eliott, Hudson, Morgan, and the Hon. G. M. Thomson be a committee to wait on the Hon. the Minister to present this resolution.

Hon. Treasurer's Report.

At the last annual meeting, owing to no anticipatory liability having been shown for printing Volume 54, the finances appeared to be in a satisfactory condition. This meeting, however, has to face quite a different position; and in consequence of the Government Printer's charges for both Volumes 54 and 55 being debited in the present balance-sheet the credit balance of £869 15s. 3d. on the 1st January, 1924, has been turned into a debit balance of £1,122 12s. 10d. on the 1st January, 1925.

Owing to the late appearance of Volume 55, the incorporated societies did not receive their copies and relative accounts until last month, therefore only two societies have paid their levies. There should be about £236 to come in from this source, but this has been taken into consideration in the balance sheet.

It will also be seen that the Government Printer's account for Volume 55—£1,518 19s.—has increased by over £163 as compared with the cost of Volume 54—£1,355 10s.—although Volume 55 had only 884 pages as against 920 in Volume 54. In 1914 the Government Printer's account for Volume 45 (419 pages) was £334, a cost of under 16s. per page, as compared with £1 14s. 7d. per page for Volume 55, an increase of over 115 per cent.

The position is a serious one, and it will be necessary thoroughly to discuss it, and, if possible, arrive at a decision on the question of the finances, at the annual meeting.

It is obvious that with the annual cost of printing the Transactions now amounting to over £1,500, and other expenses, say, £500, totalling £2,000, and on the other hand the statutory grant of £1,000, and other sources, say, £350, total £1,350, it means that the Institute must show a loss of about £650 per annum.

There appears to be only four ways by which the position can be remedied: 1) Cut down the size of the volume by more than half, or issue it every two years instead of each year: (2) obtain an increased grant from the Government; (3) charge the incorporated societies the increased cost of the Transactions; (4) find some cheaper means of printing the Transactions.

The various trust accounts continue to show a very satisfactory condition. The Carter Bequest revenue has increased from £320 17s. 3d. in 1923 to £339 6s. 3d. in 1924; the revenue earned is equal to 6.21 per cent. The capital has now grown to £5,754 12s. 11d.

Up to the present no action has been taken regarding the resolution carried at the last annual meeting to spend £3,000 on the building of an observatory in Wellington.

The books and accounts have, as usual, been well and accurately kept by the Assistant Secretary.

M. A. Eliott

,
Hon. Treasurer.

New Zealand Institute.—Statement of Receipts and Expenditure for Year ending 31st December, 1924.

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Receipts. £ s. d.
Balance as at 31st December, 1923 2,105 6 11
Petty cash in hand, 1st January, 1924 10 8 8
Publications sold (authors' copies) 92 5 8
Statutory grant, 1924 1,000 0 0
Interest, Carter Bequest 338 15 0
Interest, Hector Memorial Fund 68 10 0
Interest, Hutton Memorial Fund 58 10 0
Interest, Hamilton Memorial Fund 3 7 6
Interest on Endowment Fund invested 10 0 0
Interest, Post Office Savings-bank (Endowment Fund) 61 11 5
Interest on Carter legacy 1 10 0
Levy on Volume 54 188 5 0
Levy on Volume 55 44 15 0
Research grants paid by Department of Internal Affairs 166 0 0
Research grant—Balance refunded 0 4 8
£4,149 9 10
– 757 –

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Expenditure. £ s. d.
Government Printer 1,100 0 0
A. A. Lawson (plate) 29 5 4
Adlard, Son, and West, Newman 2 6 0
C. M. Banks (letter-book) 1 2 6
Travelling-expenses 60 8 2
Charges (bank commission, insurance, &c.) 7 11 0
Salary 283 6 8
Petty cash (postages, &c.) 13 8 9
Binding library books 15 4 4
Library shelving, cabinet, &c. 17 5 3
Hector Prize, 1923 45 0 0
Hector Prize, 1924 46 0 0
Carter interest invested 298 19 11
Interest on trust funds transferred to accounts 105 7 5
Research grants 431 1 9
Balance, as under 1,694 2 9
£4,149 9 10

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£ s. d. £ s. d.
Balance in Bank of New Zealand 242 11 8
Less unpresented cheque 30 0 0
—— —— —— 212 11 8
Balance in Post Office Savings-bank 1,474 11 2
Petty cash in hand 6 19 11
—— —— ——
£1,694 2 9

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Dr. Cr.
Made up as follows— £ s. d. £ s. d.
Library Fund 230 10 8
Government Research Grant Fund 706 8 7
Carter Bequest—Revenue Account 82 11 6
Hector Memorial Fund—Revenue Account 27 13 8
Hutton Memorial Fund—Revenue Account 80 2 7
Hamilton Memorial Fund—Revenue Account 1 9 7
Endowment Fund—Revenue Account 135 5 9
Carter Legacy—Interest 3 15 0
Government Printer 2,020 18 5
Amount overdrawn, Hamilton Fund 0 3 11
Sundry debtors 236 18 11
Deficit on year's work 1,122 12 10
Carter Bequest—Post Office Savings-bank Account 82 11 6
Hector Memorial Fund—Post Office Savings-bank Account 15 6 4
Hutton Memorial Fund—Post Office Savings-bank Account 80 2 7
Hamilton Memorial Fund—Post Office Savings-bank Account 1 9 7
£1,566 19 4 £3,261 2 1
£1,566 19 4
£1,694 2 9
– 758 –

New Zealand Institute.—Statement of Assets and Liabilities as at 31st December, 1924.

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Liabilities. £ s. d.
Carter Bequest—Capital Account 5,754 14 11
Hector Memorial Fund—Capital Account 1,184 18 1
Hutton Memorial Fund—Capital Account 1,014 5 10
Hamilton Memorial Fund—Capital Account 48 7 11
Endowment Fund—Capital Account 198 19 4
Carter Bequest—Revenue Account 82 11 6
Hutton Memorial Fund—Revenue Account 80 2 7
Hamilton Memorial Fund—Revenue Account 1 9 7
Endowment Fund—Revenue Account 135 5 9
Library Fund 230 10 8
Government research grants 706 8 7
Interest on Carter legacy of £50 3 15 0
Government Printer 2,020 18 5
£11,462 8 2

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Assets. £ s. d.
Inscribed stock, Discharged Soldiers Settlement Loan, £7,650 7,068 2 11
Post Office inscribed stock, £1,100 1,084 15 3
Government war bonds, £50 48 11 10
Hector Memorial Fund—Revenue Account 27 13 8
Petty cash in hand 6 19 11
Cash in Post-office Savings-bank 1,474 11 2
£ s. d.
Cash in Bank of New Zealand 242 11 8
Less unpresented cheque 30 0 0
212 11 8
Cash in Post-office Savings-bank—Carter Bequest Account 82 11 6
Cash in Post-office Savings-bank—Hector Fund Account 15 6 4
Cash in Post-office Savings-bank—Hutton Fund Account 80 2 7
Cash in Post-office Savings-bank—Hamilton Fund Account 1 9 7
Sundry debtors 236 18 11
Balance of liabilities over assets 1,122 12 10
£11,462 8 2

Examined and found correct.—G. F. C. Campbell, Controller and Auditor-General.

M. A. Eliott

, Hon. Treasurer.

New Zealand Institute.—Government Research Grants for Year ending 31st December, 1924.

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Dr. Cr.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
Jan.  1. By Balance 971 5 8
Jan. 21. Treasury 100 0 0
Dec. 15. Refund, Dr. Curtis 0 4 8
Dec. 19. Treasury 30 0 0
Dec. 19. Treasury 6 0 0
Dec. 19. Treasury 30 0 0
Jan. 23. To Professor Easterfield 100 0 0
Mar. 5. Dr. Inglis 25 0 0
Mar. 5. Professor Speight 50 0 0
April 12. H. Hamilton 10 0 0
June 27. Dr. Malcolm 10 0 0
July 18. J. G. Myers 10 0 0
July 18. H. J. Finlay 27 1 10
Aug. 22. E. K. Lomas 24 16 4
Aug. 28. Dr. Marsden 32 14 10
Oct. 17. Dr. Malcolm 10 0 0
Nov. 25. Artesian Wells Committee 32 11 6
Nov. 25. W. J. Phillipps 6 0 0
Nov. 25. H. J. Finlay 10 0 0
Dec. 7. Dr. C. C. Farr 7 17 3
Dec. 23. Dr. H. H. Allan 45 0 0
Dec. 23. R. S. Allen 30 0 0
Dec. 23. Balance 706 8 7
£1,137 10 4 £1,137 10 4
By Balance £706 8s. 7d.
– 759 –

New Zealand Institute.—Trust Accounts.

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Carter Bequest.—Revenue Account for the Year ending 31st December, 1924.
Dr. £ s. d. Cr. £ s. d.
To Interest invested in Post Office inscribed stock 298 19 11 By Balance 35 8 11
Balance 82 11 6 Interest on investments and Post Office Savings-bank 339 6 3
Books sold 4 13 9
Books exchanges for Transactions 2 2 5
£381 11 5 £381 11 5
By Balance £82 11 6

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Hector Memorial Fund for the Year ending 31st December, 1924.
Dr. £ s. d. Cr. £ s. d.
To Balance 6 14 10 By Interest on investments 68 10 0
Prize, 1923 45 0 0 Interest, Post Office Savings-bank 0 11 2
Prize, 1924 45 0 0 Balance 27 13 8
£96 14 10 £96 14 10
To Balance £27 13 8

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Hamilton Memorial Fund for the Year ending 31st December, 1924.
Dr. £ s. d. Cr. £ s. d.
To Balance 1 14 10 By Coupons 3 7 6
Amount overdrawn 0 3 11 Interest, Post Office Savings-bank 0 0 10
Balance 1 9 7
£3 8 4 £3 8 4
By Balance £1 9 7

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Hutton Memorial Fund for the Year ending 31st December, 1924.
Dr. £ s. d. Cr. £ s. d.
To Balance 80 2 7 By Balance 20 11 10
Interest on investments 58 10 0
Interest, Post Office Savings-bank 1 0 9
£80 2 7 £80 2 7

Administration of Research Grants.—On the motion of Mr. Wright, seconded by Professor Worley, the following resolutions were carried :—

1.

That the Board shall notify the affiliated societies of the funds available for research purposes, and invite applications at least three months prior to the latest date upon which such applications will be received by the Board.

2.

That no allocation from the Research Grants Fund shall be made until after a certain specified date, upon which all applications for the period shall close.

3.

That the date upon which the applications are to close shall be fixed by the Board.

4.

That all applications for grants shall be considered as soon as possible after the closing-date by a Research Committee. The number of members and the personnel of the committee shall be determined by the Board.

– 760 –
5.

That the Research Committee shall make its recommendation to the Board, and shall have power to make such inquiries and call for such reports, either confidentially or otherwise, as it may think fit, in order to guide its members in making recommendations.

On the motion of Dr. J. A. Thomson, it was resolved, That the Research Grants Committee consist of Dr. Chilton, Dr. C. C. Farr, Dr. Hilgendorf, Professor Speight, and Mr. A. M. Wright.

On the motion of Professor Easterfield, seconded by Dr. Malcolm, it was resolved, That the intimation of the acceptance or rejection of an application for a grant be made both to the society through which the application is made and also to the applicant himself.

Discussion on a letter from the Secretary of the Auckland Institute, dated 14th January, 1925, asking for a reconsideration of a decision of the Standing Committee regarding an Auckland application for research, was ruled out of order by the President, and the letter was referred to the Research Grants Committee.

Report of Research Grants Committee.

Dr. H. H. Allan, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1923 was granted £30 for an investigation of cocksfoot and rye-grass, reported on the 8th December that work had proceeded along the lines reported on previously (see vol. 55, p. 762). Valuable parcels of seeds have been received from the Welsh Plant-breeding Station and from the Royal Danish Agricultural Society. These seeds have been sown along with a further series of experimental plots. Dr. Allan proposes to contribute to the New Zealand Journal of Agriculture a series of articles bearing on points brought out in these preliminary trials. Unexpended portion of grant is £5.

Dr. H. H. Allan, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in August, 1924, was granted £30 for an investigation of Mount Egmont forests, reported on the 8th December that he had made arrangements to spend the month of January in the field making a preliminary examination of the forests.

The Artesian Wells Committee, which, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1921 was granted £100 for research into the sources of supply, constancy of flow, &c., of artesian wells of the Christchurch area, reported on the 2nd December that research on the fluctuations of the water-level in the Christchurch and neighbouring wells has been regularly prosecuted. No specially striking facts have recently come to light, but certainty has been reached on many important points which were previously only suppositions. A stage has now been reached at which the discovery of new facts by the method adopted is not commensurable with the labour involved in discovering them, and the research will be terminated. A full report will be presented for publication in the next volume of the Transactions. The expenditure amounted to £91 2s. 10d., and the balance has been relinquished.

Mr. G. Brittin, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1919 was granted £100 for a research in fruit-tree diseases, reported on the 9th December that the usual work of pruning and spraying had been carried out on the peach-trees under experiment with practically the same conclusions. Owing to the very wet weather brown-rot was very bad at the blossoming stage, but the application of an additional spray of 1-in-80 lime-sulphur stopped infection and saved a large proportion of the fruit. Investigations into the cause of falling fruit resulted in the conclusion that there was an insufficiency of nitrogen in the soil, and Mr. Brittin intends putting in a cover-crop of blue lupins in January, to be followed by lime when the crop is ploughed next spring. Mr. Brittin has been working in conjunction with Mr. Neil, of the Biological Department, in endeavouring to identify the disease of the peach-buds, so far with little result. The expenditure amounts to £6 18s.

Professor P. W. Burbidge, who, through the Auckland Institute, in 1921 was granted £100, and in 1923 an additional £25, for research on the intensity of long-wave signals, reported on the 4th December that during 1924 certain parts of the apparatus were reconstructed, and signals are now being well received. Arrangements are being made for regular signals from Lyons or Bordeaux, on which the actual measurements will be made. The work has been delayed during the session by the usual routine work, and, since it involves the taking of a continuous series of observations, will probably extend over the next two years. £104 3s. 4d. has been expended on apparatus.

– 761 –

Dr. K. M. Curtis, who, through the Nelson Institute, in 1920 was granted £100 for research in parasitic mycology, reported on the 14th December that she had carried out her research on twenty-two varieties of stone-fruits, including peach, apricot, nectarine, cherry, and plum, and it is evident that the current theory concerning the cause of resistance and susceptibility to the brown-rot fungus does not offer an adequate explanation for resistance in apricots, is even less adequate for peaches, and is quite inapplicable for cherries and nectarines. £99 15s. 4d. has been expended in books, and the balance refunded.

Mr. W. C. Davies, who, through the Nelson Institute, in 1921 was granted £50 for research in soil bacteria and protozoa, reported on the 16th December that the work on the bacteriology of typical soils of the Nelson district and on the soil microorganisms of the tomato-houses of Nelson is being continued as opportunity offers, and should during the coming year reach a stage warranting publication. The whole of the grant has been expended.

Professor T. H. Easterfield, who, through the Nelson Institute, was in 1921 granted £200 for investigation in orchard chemistry, reported on the 15th December that the whole of the grant had been expended, and it covered only a small part of the cost of investigation. Great attention was paid to the problem of the cool storage of fruit, and the results of 1923 investigations have appeared in the New Zealand Fruitgrower, and have been issued separately by Messrs. McLelland and Tiller, who efficiently carried out the experiments. In December, 1923, the Nelson Freezing Company altered their methods of storing fruit in accordance with the indications of the experiments, with the result that not a single case of mature apples has been condemned. In 1922 and 1923, under the old system of storing, the losses were enormous.

Professor T. H. Easterfield, who, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, in 1919 was granted £250 for a research on New Zealand mineral oils, reported last year that the research was concluded, and the results published in the Chemistry and Industry Review. A résumé of the investigations has been published in the New Zealand Journal of Science and Technology, 1924, vol. 6, pp. 274—78.

Professor C. Coleridge Farr, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1919 was granted £100, and later an additional £90, for a research on the porosity of porcelain insulators, reported on the 12th December that a good deal of work has been done during the year, although no further call has been made on the grant. Many tests for porosity have been made on insulators submitted by the Public Works Department, and experiments in insulators which broke down in consequence of a crack developing in the top shell after the insulator had been erected in position proved the design to be faulty, with insufficient provision for expansion and contraction. An unexpanded balance of £55 11s. 6d. has been surrendered.

Professor Farr, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1921 was granted £15 for research on the physical properties of gas-free sulphur, reported on the 12th December that some progress had been made during the year. The installation of a liquid-air plant at the laboratory has taken place, and it will now be possible to obtain vacua of a much higher order than was hitherto the case. The balance in hand is £4 18s. 1d.

Professor Farr, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1923 was granted £30 for investigation of the goitre incidence in Christchurch, reported on the 17th December that his assistant, Mr. Rogers, M.Sc., has during the year vigorously carried out the work. Attention was concentrated upon the question of a possible correlation between the amount of radium-emanation in the drinking-waters of the different districts surrounding Christchurch and the amount of goitre in the schools. Some correlation was obtained in this respect as far as Christchurch and its environs were concerned, but it broke down absolutely at Timaru. The influence of iodine in the drinking-water was therefore considered, and analyses are still in progress. Expenditure amounting to £9 15s. 6d. has been incurred.

Professor Farr, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, was granted £250 for an investigation of the occurrence of helium, reported on the 20th December that a beginning has been made with the investigation. Dr. Farr and his laboratory mechanic made a tour of examination round Taupo, collecting samples of gas from various springs. These samples were all hermetically sealed, and will be examined early in the year. Two small tins of gas were collected at the Karipiti blowhole, and were despatched immediately to Mr. Rogers at Christchurch, who examined them for radium-emanation. This examination confirmed the interesting result previously obtained by Dr. Marsden and Mr. Rogers, of the high radium-emanation content of the gas emitted from the hole. The high radium-emanation content seems therefore fairly well established, as the confirmation of the previous result was obtained on entirely different samples with entirely different apparatus and with another radium

– 762 –

standard. It is an interesting and perhaps an important result. Expenditure amounting to £56 4s. 8d. was incurred.

Mr. H. J. Finlay, who, through the Otago Institute, in 1923 was granted £10 to enable him to purchase certain books on palaeontology not procurable in New Zealand, reported on the 4th December that these books had now come to hand from Paris.

Mr. H. J. Finlay, who, through the Otago Institute, was in 1923 granted £100 for research on Tertiary Mollusca, reported on the 4th December that he is at work on various papers to be published in the Transactions. Collections of specimens have been made in Southland and Oamaru, and a great deal of work in sorting out and classifying, describing, &c., has been necessary. Expenditure amounting to £36 3s. 10d. has been incurred.

Mr. F. W. Foster, who in 1923 was granted £25 for the purpose of collating the notes and manuscript of the late Sir David Hutchins, reported on the 15th December that owing to his having to spend the greater part of the year in the field he had been unable to make rapid progress. The section on native forests and trees has been completed, and a start made on the exotic-trees portion. Mr. Foster is making a special effort to complete the work by May next.

Mr. H. Hamilton, who, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, in 1923 was granted £30 for research on the cave fauna of New Zealand, reported on the 13th January, that the materials collected on his visit to the Waitomo Caves at Easter are being examined by specialists, and further material has been forwarded by the manager of the hostel at Waitomo. Expenditure so far has been £6.

Dr. J. K. H. Inglis, who, through the Otago Institute, in 1923 was granted £25 for research on the essential oils of the native plants, reported on the 10th December that the grant had been expended in apparatus specially designed, and investigation of the essential oils from Dacrydium cupressinum had been the subject of a preliminary paper by Messrs. McDowall and Finlay. Leptospermum scoparium investigation is not yet complete, and Myoporum laetum investigation is being continued by Mr. McDowall in England. A ton of ngaio-leaves has been put through the apparatus. Further work will be carried out in 1925.

Professor R. Jack, who, through the Otago Institute, in 1917 was granted £25 for investigation of the electric charge on rain, reported on the 4th December that the grant was expended in purchasing a cathode-ray oscillograph tube. During the session this apparatus has been employed in the investigation of the nature of the potentials, phases, amount of modulation, &c., in wireless circuits. The results have been embodied in a thesis for the degree of M.Sc., and an 1851 Exhibition Research Scholarship.

Dr. J. Malcolm, who, through the Otago Institute, in 1919 was granted £250, and later on £175, for a research on the food values of New Zealand fish, reported on the 16th December that investigations had been commenced on the insulin obtainable from groper and the large fish, but owing to difficulty in obtaining sufficient material the work was abandoned. Observations were made on the fat of the red cod under two different feeding-conditions, and a paper on the subject is in preparation for publication in the Transactions. Preliminary work on the vitamin—A content of mutton-bird oil and fish-oils was undertaken, and the evidence so far obtained shows that mutton-bird oil is one of the richest known natural sources of vitamin A.

Dr. J. Malcolm, who, through the Otago Institute, in 1918 was granted £30 for research on New Zealand plant products, reported on the 16th December that work had been carried on specially in connection with the action of pukateine hydrochloride on the heart. The unexpended balance is £10.

Dr. E. Marsden, who, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, during the year was granted £60 for a seismological research, reports that he has been unable to undertake research work until towards the close of the year.

Mr. E. K. Lomas, who, through the Wellington Philosophical Society, was granted in 1923 £25 for a research on the intelligence of school-children, reported on the 14th January that he had restricted himself to children in the Fifth and Sixth Standards of the schools in Wellington, and he has almost finished the preliminary work of examination. The detailed marking of about a thousand papers takes considerable time, and this work is only half-finished. Mr. Lomas trusts to be able to furnish a full and complete account of the whole investigation within three months.

Mr. R. Speight, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1919 was granted £225 for a geological survey of the Malvern Hills, reported on the 10th December that field-work had been continued in the area as occasion offered. Most of the work had reference to the circumstances governing the occurrence of clays and sands, notably the former. Samples were collected and transmitted to Mr. Page to deal with, and a detailed report has been submitted by Mr. Page. The general result of the field-work is to indicate that while the total volume of the clays is very great,

– 763 –

and some samples are of moderately high grade, large deposits of high-grade clay of uniform character are not likely to be met with. The deposits are essentially patchy, though one or two are perhaps promising. The report on the whole district should be available during the coming year. Expenses for the year amounted to £9 3s. 6d.

Messrs. Wild and Tankersley, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, were in 1923 granted £25 for soil-survey in the Manawatu district, reported on the 15th January that early in the year Professor Speight assisted in working out the geological structure of the country under consideration. Some results have been published in a paper on the geology of the district in the November issue of the Journal of Science and Technology. During the year further observations of the soils of the district were made, samples collected, and some analytical work was done. Field experiment work (a) on the value of potash, and (b) on the top-dressing of grassland, has been carried on with the help of the staff in the Agricultural High School, and results have been published in Bulletins Nos. 2 and 3 of the school. Expenditure has amounted to £4 2s.

Professor F. P. Worley, who, through the Auckland Institute, in 1923 was granted £25 for a research on the chemistry of the essential oils of New Zealand flora, reported on the 22nd December that progress had been delayed for want of apparatus too costly to obtain from the grant, but this has now been obtained from other means. The investigation of the essential oil of one shrub is nearly completed, and will be ready for publication early next year. The balance of £15 will be expended during the summer in collecting fresh material for further investigation.

Mr. A. M. Wright, who, through the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, in 1921 was granted £75 for research in the vitamin content of commercial meat products, reported on the 16th December that the work during the year was confined to a further examination of various modifications of the yeast cultural method for the determination of vitamin B in the cold-water extract from fresh and frozen beef. The results obtained indicate that the cold-water extracts from both the fresh and frozen materials contain some substance or substances which exert an influence upon the development and growth of yeast, but it is not possible as yet to state whether the results noted are due to the presence of vitamin B or to other substances. No expenditure has been incurred during the year.

Miss M. Mestayer reported that the balance of the Hutton grant of £10 has been expended in drawings for a paper she has written on New Zealand Amphineura.

Fellowship Election.—The election for two Fellowships was then proceeded with, and resulted in the election of Professor J. Macmillan Brown, Chancellor of the New Zealand University, and Dr. P. H. Buck (Te Rangi Hiroa), of the Health Department, Auckland.

It was resolved that the number of Fellows to be elected in 1925 be two.

Hector Award for 1925.—The recommendation of the Hector Award Committee, Professors Easterfield and Robertson, was then received by the President in a sealed envelope, as follows :—

The Hector Award Committee has had some difficulty in deciding between the qualifications of the New Zealand chemists eligible for the Hector Prize and Medal. They are, however, of the opinion that the award should be made to Mr. B. C. Aston, F.I.C., F.N.Z.Inst., Hon. Secretary of the New Zealand Institute and Chief Chemist in the Department of Agriculture, for his researches on the chemistry of bush sickness and of the New Zealand flora.

Thomas H. Easterfield

,
Chairman, Hector Award Committee.

The recommendation was adopted.

Hector Prize Fund.—Report from Hon. Treasurer :—

The maximum amount of the prize is limited by the annual income derived from the investments of the Capital Fund: no part of the capital can be used for such purpose. The Board of Governors shall award any amount it may deem advisable for a prize up to the above-mentioned limit. In other words, the prize shall be to the value of any sum from one farthing to the maximum limit. No part of the revenue, except for administration expenses, can be applied to any other purpose than an annual prize.

The report was received. It was resolved that the amount of the Hector Prize for the next two years be £45.

– 764 –

Election of Honorary Member.—An election for one vacancy in the honorary members roll was then taken, and the Honorary Returning Officer (Professor Segar) later announced that Dr. A. C. Haddon, F.R.S., had been elected.

Vacancies in Honorary Membership.—It was announced that Dr. Otto Klotz, an honorary member, had died, and a vacancy was thus created to be filled at next annual meeting.

Catalogue of New Zealand Fishes.—On the motion of the Hon. G. M. Thomson, seconded by Dr. Chilton, it was resolved, That, in view of the recent action of the Government in appointing a scientific expert to report on the fisheries of New Zealand, a step which this Institute hails with pleasure, the Institute requests the Government to take the necessary steps to have a catalogue of the fishes of this Dominion prepared by a qualified expert.

Science Congress, 1926.—The Hon. G. M. Thomson announced the arrangements made for holding the Science Congress in Dunedin in January, next.

Pan-Pacific Congress.—Correspondence with the Auckland Institute was read, and, on the motion of Professor Easterfield, seconded by Professor Segar, it was resolved, That the New Zealand Institute approves of the holding of a Pan-Pacific Science Congress in Auckland at an early date, and is prepared to send an invitation for the holding of this conference to the meeting to be held in Japan in 1926; that a joint deputation of the New Zealand Institute and the Auckland Institute wait on the Government at a suitable date with a view to obtaining a grant of £2,000.

Advisory Board of Astronomy and Seismology.—Correspondence from the Under-Secretary of Internal Affairs was read, and, on the motion of Dr. C. Coleridge Farr, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved, That in the opinion of this Board it is very desirable that a Board, consisting partly of scientific men appointed by the Board and partly of nominees of the Government, be set up by the Government to act on a Board of advice for the geophysical services of the Dominion.

Standing Committee Meetings.—On the motion of Mr. Wright, seconded by Dr. Farr, it was resolved, That notification of all meetings of the Standing Committee shall be sent to every member of the Board in time to reach him at least forty-eight hours prior to the meeting; the notification calling the meeting shall contain a memorandum of the business which is to come before the meeting.

Notices of Motion.—The following notices of motion were negatived :—

1.

That the Standing Committee consists of seven members, to be appointed at the annual meeting of the Board of Governors. Proposed by Dr. Chilton.

2.

That the last portion of clause 25 of the Regulations for the Fellowship of the New Zealand Institute be amended so as to read, “for five consecutive years,” instead of “for three years immediately preceding his election.” Proposed by Dr. Malcolm, seconded by Dr. Marshall.

3.

That the fund now known as the Endowment Fund (now amounting to £334) having no defined use, and therefore not likely to be supplemented

– 765 –

by donations or bequests, be in future known as the Building Fund, with the defined object of contributing towards the cost of a building for the Institute, a requirement approved at the last annual meeting (see at foot of p. 748, vol. 55, and p. 745, for definition of Endowment Fund). Proposed by Mr. Aston, seconded by Mr. Eliott.

4.

That clause 25, Regulations governing the Fellowship of the New Zealand Institute, be amended to read as follows: “No person shall be elected as Fellow unless he is a British subject and had been a member of one of the incorporated societies for ten years immediately preceding his election.” Proposed by Mr. G. V. Hudson, seconded by Mr. Hill.

Election of Officers.—The election of officers resulted in the following appointments: President, Dr. P. Marshall; Hon. Secretary, Mr. B. C. Aston; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. M. A. Eliott; Hon. Editor, Mr. J. C. Andersen; Hon. Auditor, Professor Sommerville; Hon. Librarian, Professor Sommerville; Hon. Returning Officer, Professor Segar; Managers, Trust Accounts, Messrs. B. C. Aston and M. A. Eliott.

Election of Committees.—The following committees for 1925 were appointed :—

Publications Committee: The Standing Committee, with the Hon. Editor.

Research Grants Committee: Drs. Chilton, Farr, Hilgendorf, Professor Speight, and Mr. A. M. Wright.

Library Committee: Professors Sommerville, Kirk, Cotton, and Dr. Thomson.

Hector Award Committee: Messrs. Elsdon Best, Professor Benham, and Dr. Thomson.

Date and Place of next Annual Meeting.—To be held in Wellington on Tuesday, 26th January, 1926.

Votes of Thanks.—A special vote of thanks was unanimously accorded to Miss Wood, Assistant Secretary, for her work during the year. Votes of thanks were passed to Victoria College for the use of the rooms; to the Press for its attendance at the meeting; to the honorary officers of the Institute for their work during the past year; to the Hon. the Minister and the Under-Secretary for Internal Affairs, for the allocation of a room in the Parliament Buildings for the stocks of Transactions; and to the President.

Travelling-expenses.—It was resolved, That the travelling-expenses of the Governors to the meeting be paid.