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Volume 61, 1930
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Minutes of Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors, 30th January, 1930.

The Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors was held on Thursday, 30th January, 1930, at 10 a.m., in the Biology Lecture Hall, Victoria University College, Wellington.

Present: Representing the Government—Dr. L. Cockayne, Dr. E. Marsden, Messrs. B. C. Aston and W. R. B. Oliver; representing Auckland Institute—Professors H. W. Segar and F. P. Worley; representing Wellington Philosophical Society—Mr. G. V. Hudson; representing Philosophical Institute of Canterbury—Dr. C. Coleridge Farr and Mr. A. M. Wright; representing Otago Institute—Hon. G. M. Thomson and Professor J. Park; representing Manawatu Philosophical Society—Mr. M. A. Eliott; representing Nelson Institute—Professor T. H. Easterfield.

Apologies for absence were received from Professor H. B. Kirk (Wellington Philosophical Society) and Mr. W. H. Guthrie-Smith (Hawkes Bay Philosophical Institute).

Presidential Address: The President, Dr. C. Coleridge Farr, at the commencement of his address, asked the Board to stand in respect to the memory of Dr. Charles Chilton, late Government representative on the Board; also to Captain Bollons, Sir Baldwin Spencer, F.R.S., Dr. Geoffrey Duffield and Captain Ault of the Research ship “Carnegie.” At the conclusion of Dr. Farr's address, Dr. Cockayne moved a very hearty vote of thanks to Dr. Farr and asked him that he allow his address to be published in the Transactions.

Notices of Motion were then called for.

Fellowship Election: The election for two Fellows resulted in Dr. W. P. Evans and Mr. A. Philpott being elected.

Fellowship, 1931: On the motion of Dr. Cockayne, seconded by Mr. Hudson, it was resolved that two Fellows be elected in 1931.

Hector Award: The Hector Award Committee, Dr. L. Cockayne and the Hon. G. M. Thomson, recommended “That the award be

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made to the Rev. Dr. John Holloway, F.N.Z.Inst., for researches destined to become classical—on the Prothallus and young plant of Tmesipterus and on his producing artificially and studying carefully the Protnalli of certain Hymenophyllacae.”—Carried by acclamation.

Amount of Hector Prize: It was resolved that the amount of the Hector Prize for 1930 be £60.

Honorary Membership: Dr. J. Schmidt was elected an Honorary Member.

Incorporated Societies' Reports and Balance Sheets were laid on the table as follows:—Auckland Institute, Wellington Philosophical Society, Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, Otago Institute, Nelson Institute.

Report of the Standing Committee for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

Meetings: During the year six meetings of the Standing Committee have been held, the attendance being as follows:—Dr. C. Colerdige Farr, President, Christchurch, 6; Mr. B. C. Aston, Wellington, 6; Dr. L. Cockayne, Ngaio, 5; Mr. M. A. Eliott, Palmerston north, 1; Mr. G. V. Hudson, Wellington, 6; Professor H. B. Kirk, Wellington, 4; Mr. W. R. B. Oliver, Wellington, 6; Hon. G. M. Thomson, Dunedin, 2.

The Late Dr. Charles Chilton: It was with the deepest regret that the Standing Committee learned of the death of Dr. Charles Chilton, who was for so long a member of the Board of Governors. At a meeting of the Standing Committee, held on the 6th November, Dr. Farr moved the following resolution which was carried in silence:—

“That this meeting of the Standing Committee of the New Zealand Institute learns with the greatest regret of the death of Dr. Charles Chilton, D.Sc., LL.D., F.L.S., C.M.Z.S., F.N.Z.Inst., a Hutton Medalist of this Institute and a Mueller Medalist of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science, late President of the New Zealand Institute and at the time of his death one of the Board of Governors, and desires to place on record its appreciation of his great services to Science. In that department of learning which he made his principal life study, the Crustacea, he was one of the leading authorities in the world. The Standing Committee realises the loss to science and to the Dominion caused by his death.”

This resolution was forwarded to Mrs. Chilton and was also published in the press.

Vacancy on the Board of Governors: On the 6th November the Under-Secretary of Internal Affairs was advised of the death of Dr. Chilton, one of the Government representatives, and informed that the Standing Committee would like to suggest that Dr. Marsden fill the vacancy thus created. On the 16th December the Under-Secretary wrote intimating that Dr. Marsden had been appointed a member of the Board of Governors.

Publications: The final part of Volume 59 of the Transactions of the N.Z. Institute was issued in March, the first part of Volume 60 in May, the second part in August, the third part in December and the fourth part will be issued early in 1930.

Parts 2, 3, and 4 of Volume 59 and part 1 of Volume 60 were laid on the table of the House of Representatives on the 18th July, and on the table of the Legislative Council on the 24th July. The later parts are in the hands of the Under-Secretary of Internal Affairs for presentation.

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Abstracts: Early in the year the Auckland Institute wrote protesting against the inclusion of abstracts in the Transactions and later a similar protest was received from the Otago Institute. In view of the attitude taken up by these societies it was decided at a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 28th March to obtain the opinion of the other incorporated societies on the matter. It was found that the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury was the only one in favour of publishing abstracts in the Transactions, and it was therefore decided to discontinue publishing them.

Exchange List: On the recommendation of the Library Committee the following libraries have been added to the Exchange List:—

Royal Zoological Society, New South Wales.

Wanganui Public Library.

University Botanical Museum, Oslo.

Entomological Department of the National Museum, Prague.

Institute for Scientific Exploration of the North, Moscow.

Taihoku Imperial University, Formosa.

Metropolitan Library, Peking.

Partial Sets: Partial sets of the Transactions have been presented to the Petone Library and also to the Petone Working Men's Club and Institute.

Library: The Library is growing rapidly and it continues to be used and appreciated by the staff and honours students of Victoria College as well as by members of the Institute. Many volumes have also been posted to members living out of Wellington.

The Institute is deeply indebted to Mr. G. V. Hudson, who generously presented a copy of his valuable book “Butterflies and Moths of New Zealand,” to Mr. H. T. Ferrar, who continues to pass on to the Library his Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, and to an Honorary Member, Dr. J. S. Haldane for his book on “Gases and Liquids.”

Sales: There has been a considerable increase in the sales for the year largely accounted for by the fact that two complete sets of Transactions were sold. The sale of Transactions amounted to £98 and Bulletins and Indexes realised £7. One set of Maori Art has also been sold.

Incorporated Societies: The following reports and balance sheets of incorporated societies have been received and are now laid on the table:—

Auckland Institute for the year ending 31st March, 1929.

Wellington Philosophical Society for the year ending 31st October, 1929.

Philosophical Institute of Canterbury for the year ending 31st October, 1929.

Nelson Institute for the year ending 31st October, 1929.

Otago Institute for the year ending 30th November, 1929.

Deputation to the Hon. the Prime Minister: At the last Annual Meeting of the Board the Standing Committee was instructed to arrange a deputation to the Prime Minister with a view to having the New Zealand Institute Act amended. At a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 28th March a sub-committee was set up to consider the required amendments, and it was subsequently decided that the Prime Minister be asked

(1) That the statutory grant be increased;

(2) That the finance clause be again embodied in the Act.

(3) That Section 8 (1) be amended to read “The Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors shall be held after the 31st March in each year, the date and place may be fixed at the previous annual meeting.”

The Prime Minister met the deputation on the 12th June. The speakers placed before him the required amendments, explaining the necessity for them and asked, too, that the Institute's debt to the Government Printer be wiped out or considerably reduced. Sir Joseph Ward promised that the Act

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would be amended to allow of the alteration of the date of the annual meeting and that he would look carefully into the other matters dealt with. On the 16th August he replied to the effect that it was not considered desirable from the point of view of financial control to transfer the clause in the Finance Act to the Institute's own Act; that the request for an increased grant could not be considered then, nor could he hold out any hope for an increased grant in the immediate future; that the request regarding the date of the annual meeting had been noted for consideration when an amendment of the Act is being dealt with, and that he regretted he could not see his way to agree to the Institute's debt to the Government Printer being written off.

A further endeavour was made to induce the Prime Minister to bring down during the Session the amending bill for the change of date of the annual meeting, but this proved unsuccessful.

Hector Award: At a largely attended meeting of the Otago Institute, held on the 18th June, the Hector Medal was presented to the Hon. G. M. Thomson, M.L.C., by the Hon. T. K. Sidey, M.L.C., and Chancellor of the Otago University. Mr. Sidey outlined the work of Sir James Hector in the cause of science in New Zealand, and after referring to the names of those to whom the medal had previously been awarded, spoke of the researches in zoology and botany carried out in New Zealand by the Hon. G. M. Thomson.

Hutton Award: At a special general meeting of the Wellington Philosophical Society, held in aid of the Earthquake Fund on the 10th July, opportunity was taken to present the Hutton Medal to Mr. G. V. Hudson. In the unavoidable absence of the President of the Institute, Dr. Farr, the President of the Wellington Philosophical Society, Mr. W. R. B. Oliver, made the presentation.

Darwin Medal: At last Annual Meeting it was suggested that, provided the Royal Society was willing, the Darwin Medal should be presented to Dr. L. Cockayne at some public function. It was ascertained that the Royal Society had no objection to this being done and the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, of which Dr. Cockayne is a Life Member, undertook to arrange for the presentation. A most successful function was held in Christchurch on the 7th August, when Dr. Farr presented the Darwin Medal to Dr. Cockayne.

Fellowship New Zealand Institute: On the 21st March, Drs. G. H. Cunningham and J. Henderson were gazetted Fellows of the New Zealand Institute. Ten nominations for the 1930 Fellowship were received from incorporated societies and were submitted to the Fellows for selection. The result of the selection reported by the Honorary Returning Officer was submitted to the members of the Board of Governors on the 18th October.

National Research Council: The report of the sub-committee which was discussed at last Annual Meeting was referred back to the incorporated societies for report. These reports came to hand and were referred to the sub-committee, Dr. Farr and Mr. A. M. Wright, for consideration. The matter will come up again at the Annual Meeting.

Research Grants: The total amount voted this year by the Government towards the Institute's research grants was £750, leaving a very limited amount for new applications. The applications for new grants received amounted to nearly £900. Eight grants for £172 were approved and two more for £200 are still under consideration.

(The two grants referred to have since been approved).

Honorary Members: One vacancy in the Honorary Membership was declared at last Annual Meeting. Four nominations to fill this vacancy were received and the election will take place at the Annual Meeting.

Pacific Science Congress: At a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 12th February, Dr. J. S. Maclaurin was elected the Institute's representative on the Pacific Science Congress Council. On the 28th March, Dr. P.

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Marshall was also appointed to represent the Institute at the Fourth Congress held this year at Java. The reports of these two representatives will be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Board.

Carter Bequest: At a meting of the Standing Committee on the 12th February, it was resolved that legislative sanction be sought for any contemplated diversion of the Carter Bequest, and that the approval of a meeting of the New Zealand Institute Board of Governors be obtained before any moneys are paid over. At the next meeting of the Standing Committee a sub-committee of four members of the Standing Committee was set up to deal with the above resolution. This committee has not yet reported any action.

T. K. Sidey Summertime Fund: In January last a telegram was received by Dr. Benham from the Hon. T. K. Sidey, M.L.C., as follows: “When Summer Time Act, 1927, was passed a shilling subscription Commemoration Fund was raised, amounting to several hundred pounds. It is proposed that interest of fund be applied to award medal and monetary prize for best contribution on subject of light in relation to human welfare. Medal to be awarded at intervals of some years so that accumulation of income may provide a fair monetary gift, ten per cent. of income to be added annually to capital and say one per cent. deducted for administrative expenses. Can you ascertain whether New Zealand Institute would accept money and undertake administration of fund? If so, I shall ask Summer Time Committee to communicate with Council of Institute.”

(Signed) T. K. Sidey.

Dr. Benham placed this telegram before the Institute and a special meeting of the Board was held in Auckland on the 25th January, when it was agreed to accept the administration of the fund along the lines suggested. On the 22nd July the Honorary Secretary of the Summer Time Appreciation Fund forwarded to the Secretary of the Institute a cheque for £500, being the balance of the fund, and subsequently the Standing Committee set up a sub-committee to draw up regulations with the Hon. T. K. Sidey. On the 6th November this committee reported that the proposed regulations and Deed of Trust had been drawn up and had been submitted to Mr. Sidey for his approval. These regulations will be finally submitted to the Board of Governors at the Annual Meeting for adoption.

Science Congress, 1929: Seven resolutions passed at the Science Congress in Auckland were forwarded to the Institute and were dealt with at meetings of the Standing Committee held on the 12th February and 28th March as follows:—

1. That the General Committee of the Science Congress approves of the committee set up by the Biology Section to further nature study in schools, and recommends that it be appointed as a committee of the Institute to cooperate with the Education Department in promoting nature study and natural science in the primary and post-primary schools. The personnel of the committee to be Rev. Dr. Holloway, Dr. L. Cockayne, Mr. R. A. Falla and the Hon. G. M. Thomson.

This resolution was confirmed by the Standing Committee.

2. That it be recommended that at future congresses, if sufficient papers are sent in in any of the subjects grouped in one section in this Congress, these sections be divided into appropriate parts.

This resolution was not confirmed.

3. That the Secretary of the Congress be directed to advise the authors of papers that the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, the N.Z. Journal of Science & Technology and the Polynesian Journal will be prepared to consider for publication any papers read at the Science Congress.

This resolution was confirmed.

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4. That it be a recommendation to the Secretary of the next Congress that a list of all papers to be read at the Congress be circulated to intending members as far in advance as possible to facilitate preparation of discussion.

This resolution was confirmed.

5. That the General Committee of the Science Congress records its thanks, particularly, on behalf of the Auckland members, to Mr. Archey and his staff for the efficient manner in which all matters in connection with the Congress were arranged and that Mr. Archey be asked to convey this expression of the committee's appreciation of their efforts to the members of the Institute. and Museum staffs.

This was very heartily endorsed by the Standing Committee.

6. A resolution passed by the Economics and Social Science Section and forwarded by its secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Hon. Minister of Health as follows: “That in view of recent cases more adequate safeguards against the improper committal of persons to mental hospitals should be provided by means of a revision of existing law and practice,” was not endorsed by the General Committee of the Congress, and the Standing Committee resolved that the matter of representation to the Government by Science Congress meetings be discussed at next Annual Meeting.

7. A resolution passed by the Anthropological and History Section of the Congress and approved by the General Committee was as follows:—

That the Anthropology and History Section of the Congress urges the New Zealand Institute to devise some means for enlisting the sympathy of suitable persons in the project of collecting material for an archaeological survey of New Zealand. It further suggests that the Institute should approach the Government and ask (1) That assistance be given to the project and (2) That legislation be passed in order that sites likely to be of value for this purpose be protected from unauthorised and unqualified persons.

The Standing Committee, after discussing this resolution, asked Mr. Oliver to report on the subject at next meeting. Mr. Oliver, in his report at the following meeting, outlined the action that the late Dr. Allan Thomson had previously taken in the matter.

The President of the N.Z. Tourist League wrote to enlist the sympathy of the New Zealand Institute in an endeavour “to preserve the National Monuments of New Zealand by the formation of a National Park Conservation Board which it was hoped would particularly supplement the good work which had been done for many years by the Scenery Preservation Commissioners in the purchase and reservation of bush and scenic areas.” The subject was discussed at several meetings of the Standing Committee and on the 25th September it was finally resolved to refer the subject of Scenery Preservation to the Annual Meeting of the Board and that a committee should then be set up.

Rainbow Mountain: At a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 28th March it was reported that there was a movement on foot to destroy the shrubs and growth on Rainbow Mountain, and Dr. Cockayne was asked to draft a letter of protest to the Hon. Minister in charge of scenery preservation, who replied as follows: “.… Representations have been made to my Department that steps should be taken to clear the slopes of Rainbow Mountain of teatree and fern in order that tourists might view the full beauty of the mountain; but it is felt that it would not be desirable to take any steps that might result in the burning of the vegetation. It is considered that the mountain should be left in its present condition and the vegetation allowed to flourish even if certain areas of coloured soil and rocks are thereby somewhat obscured. It is of course possible that further representations may be made on the lines of those already submitted; but you may be assured that my Department would not recommend the taking of any action to clear the growth without giving the fullest possible consideration to all

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aspects of the question and without becoming convinced that such action was not only practicable but also necessary in the best interests of the reserve.”

Dominion Museum: Early in the year an effort was made to have the New Zealand Institute represented on the Board of Trustees of the Dominion Museum, and the Chairman of the Board was written to on the matter. On the 29th April the acting-Hon. Secretary replied that the matter would be further discussed at the next meeting of the Board of Trustees. No further communication has been received.

On the 25th September, Mr. Oliver, Director of the Dominion Museum, reported as to the provision which had been made in the estimated space for the New Zealand Institute in the plans of the new Museum. He also stated that the Dominion Museum was being inequitably treated in the proposed allocation of cost of the new buildings in that the allocation suggested as between the Museum and Art Gallery was not that originally intended, and he urged the Institute to assist with other interested bodies in an attempt to have the original allocation adhered to. On the 6th November the Hon. G. M. Thomson again brought up the matter of the allocation between the Museum and Art Gallery and read some correspondence between himself and the Mayor of Wellington. After some discussion it was resolved that a sub-committee consisting of Mr. Oliver, Hon. G. M. Thomson and Dr. Marsden be set up to obtain all the facts and information regarding the recent history of the scheme and to organise a conference with the Mayor. This conference has not yet been arranged.

Scientific Survey of Native Birds: The Secretary of the Nelson Bush and Bird Preservation Society forwarded on the 11th April the following resolution:—“That this Society strongly urges that a well-organised scientific survey of the habits of the native birds of New Zealand be carried out with as little delay as possible, and that in this matter the interested societies, such as the N.Z. Acclimatisation Society, N.Z. Forestry League, N.Z. Native Bird Protection Society and the New Zealand Institute, should provide the necessary finance, subsidised by the Government.”

It was decided to refer the above resolution to the Annual Meeting and that the Nelson Society should be asked what proposed organisation it would consider necessary and the probable expenses of such a survey. This information has not yet been supplied.

Destruction of Shags: The Standing Committee resolved to support Mr. E. F. Stead, of Christchurch, in his endeavour to have the shag protected, and at a meeting of the Standing Committee, held on the 25th September, it was decided to write to the Marine Department endorsing Mr. Stead's action.

Former Honorary Editor: On the 12th June a letter was received from the Wellington Philosophical Society suggesting that the services of the former Editor, Mr. J. C. Andersen, be recognised in some tangible manner and that incorporated societies and the New Zealand Institute contribute sufficient to enable Mr. Andersen to become a life member of one of the societies. At a subsequent meeting it was resolved that a substantial presentation be made to Mr. Andersen for the valuable services he had rendered to the Institute as Honorary Editor and that incorporated societies be asked to open subscription lists, and that the matter be then referred to the Annual Meeting.

Solar Eclipse: At a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 6th November a letter was received from the Wellington Philosophical Society asking that the New Zealand Institute support Dr. C. E. Adams in an application for loan of instruments to observe the solar eclipse of October, 1930. It was resolved to assist Dr. Adams as far as possible.

London Agency: Messrs. Wheldon & Wosley Ltd., having indicated that they wish to relinquish the agency of the New Zealand Institute in London, it was decided that Mr. N. Wright, of the High Commissioner's Office, be asked to make enquiries regarding a new agency.

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Carter Legacy: On an undertaking from the Institute that the Carter Legacy would not be withdrawn for at least a further five years, the Public Trustee agreed to allow 5¼% interest on the amount.

Scientific Survey of the New Zealand Coast: Early in the year an effort was made by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, supported by the President of the Institute, to induce the Government to employ the U.S. Barque “City of New York” of the Byrd Expedition, which was then lying idle at Port Chalmers, and would be there for many months, in a scientific survey of the coasts of New Zealand. A representative committee was set up and it agreed on certain lines of action in the proposed survey. However, the scheme fell through as the Government considered it would involve too great an expense which the results would not justify, and Commander Byrd also was afraid of taking any risks with his relief ship and so imperil the success of his Expedition.

Standing Committee' Report: The report of the Standing Committee was considered clause by clause and adopted.

Arising therefrom:

Science Congress Resolutions: On the motion of Dr. Marsden it was resolved “That any resolution passed at any Science Congress be forwarded to the Standing Committee for approval and transmission to the Government if approved.”

Nature Study in Schools: Dr. Cockayne reported what action the committee set up to further nature study in schools had taken, and after some discussion it was resolved, on the motion of Professor Worley, seconded by Dr. Marsden, “That the Academic Board and the Entrance Board of the University of New Zealand be requested to consider the possibility of modifying the syllabus for the University Entrance Examination and the syllabus of the University Entrance Scholarship in such a way as to encourage the study in schools of natural history in its original sense.”

On the motion of Professor Easterfield, seconded by Dr. Cockayne, it was resolved “That the Board of Governors suggests to the Minister of Education that inasmuch as the New Zealand Institute stands in a similar relationship to science in New Zealand to that in which the Royal Society stands to science in Great Britain, it would be in the interest of education in New Zealand if the New Zealand Institute were officially consulted in connection with any proposed changes in the science teaching in primary and post primary schools.”

Scientific Survey of Native Birds: It was resolved that the Standing Committee deal with this matter after the Nelson Bird and Bush Society had supplied the information required.

Presentation to Former Hon. Editor: It was resolved that the matter be left in the hands of the Standing Committee for action.

Hon. Treasurer's Report.

The Balance Sheet for the year ending 31st December, 1929, shows a debit balance of £287/19/8, which amount, however, includes a debit balance of £249/6/4 brought forward from the previous year.

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The amount due to the Government Printer has been reduced from £877/0/9 to £521/9/7, the balance still owing has been swelled by the inclusion of £198/2/3 interest debited during the past four years. The amount charged by the Government Printer for Volume 56 was £1610/15/5. Under the new arrangements with a private publishing firm, Volume 57 cost £1316/10/0, Volume 58 (in four parts) £839/7/3, Volume 59 (in four parts) £1432/18/0, and Parts 1 and 2 of Volume 60 £484/6/4. The high cost of Volume 59 was due to Part 4 costing £510/9/9—about double the amount of any other part. All liabilities for printing up to and including Part 2 of Volume 60 have been paid and in addition £400 has been paid to the Government Printer in reduction of his old account.

Outstanding Accounts: A special effort should be made to collect these, as one in particular has been owing for over five years.

Trust Accounts: The Carter Bequest Capital Account now stands at £7556/8/8, showing an increase of £400 over the previous year.

The Hutton Memorial Fund Capital Account also shows an increase from £1114 to £1214, and the other Trust Accounts remain in a satisfactory condition.

We have been entrusted with a new fund, viz., the T. K. Sidey Summer Time Fund, of £500. This amount will be invested in approved securities and the interest derived used as a Prize Fund.

We will have the above amount, together with about £500 from the various Trust Revenue Accounts to invest this month, and I consider that we should purchase the new issue of Government Bonds bearing interest at 5½%.

I desire to once again compliment the Assistant-Secretary on the manner in which the books and accounts have been kept.

(Signed) M. A. Eliott,


Honorary Treasurer.

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New Zealand Institute.
Statement of Receipts and Expenditure for the Year ending
31st December, 1929.

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Receipts.
£ s. d.
Balance as at 31st December, 1928 1443 8 5
Statutory Grant 1500 0 0
Levy, Volume 59, Trans. N.Z. Inst. 186 15 0
Sales of Publications 64 8 10
Author's corrections paid 3 15 6
Research Grants from Treasury, etc. 707 7 4
T. K. Sidey Summer Time Fund 500 0 0
Donations, Presentation late Hon. Editor 3 2 6
Interest, Post Office Savings Bank 43 1 6
Carter Bequest Interest 404 13 8
Hutton Memorial Fund Interest 68 6 4
Hector Memorial Fund Interest 68 12 6
Carter Library Legacy Interest 8 0 0
Endowment Fund Interest 23 3 7
Transfer to B.N.Z. from Hector Fund Account 2 17 7
£5027 12 9

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Expenditure.
£ s. d.
Ferguson & Osborn Ltd. (Printing) 1372 7 10
Government Printer (On Account) 400 0 0
Stationery, etc. 8 6 8
Travelling Expenses 64 13 7
Salary 300 0 0
Charges 10 16 6
Petty Cash 17 6 10
Research Grant Instalments 665 15 8
Hutton Research Grants 33 2 7
Hector Award Prize 55 0 0
Hector Medals and Duty 16 10 1
Carter Bequest Reinvested 400 0 0
Trust Funds transferred to Accounts 47 17 5
Balance as under 1635 15 7
£5027 12 9

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£ s. d. £ s. d.
Balance in Bank New Zealand 306 15 1
Less Unpresented Cheques 27 1 0
279 14 1
Balance in Post Office Savings Bank 1353 14 11
Petty Cash in Hand 2 6 7
£1635 15 7

The Audit Office, having examined the Balance Sheet and accompanying Accounts, required by law to be audited, hereby certifies them to be correct.

G. F. C. Campbell,.


Controller and Auditor-General.

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New Zealand Institute.
Revenue Account for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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Expenditure.
£ s. d.
Balance as at 31st December, 1928 249 6 4
Printing and Stationery 1424 0 10
Salary 300 0 0
Travelling Expenses 64 13 7
Charges (Insurance, Bank, Audit) 10 16 6
Petty Cash 17 6 10
£2066 4 1

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Income.
£ s. d.
Statuory Grant 1500 0 0
Sales of Publications and Levy 278 4 5
Balance 287 19 8
£2066 4 1
To Balance £287 19 8
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New Zealand Institue.
Statement of Assets and Liabilities as at 31st December, 1929.

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Liabilities.
£ s. d.
Carter Bequest Capital Account 7,556 8 8
Hector Memorial Fund Capital Account 1,184 18 1
Hutton Memorial Fund Capital Account 1,214 6 0
Hamilton Memorial Fund Capital Account 56 11 6
Carter Library Legacy Capital Account 100 0 0
Endowment Fund 497 17 0
T. K. Sidey Summer Time Fund 500 0 0
Carter Bequest Revenue Account 65 6 0
Hector Memorial Fund Revenue Account 64 1 9
Hutton Memorial Fund Revenue Account 157 2 6
Hamilton Memorial Fund Revenue Account 2 19 9
Carter Library Legacy Revenue Account 34 13 2
Endowment Fund Revenue Account 165 14 6
Library Fund 176 19 4
Research Grant Fund 649 4 9
Government Printer 521 9 7
Faxon & Co. Ltd. 1 3 10
Contributions, Presentation late Hon. Ed. 3 2 6
£12,951 18 11
Assets.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
Inscribed Stock 8,418 2 11
P.O. Inscribed Stock 2,135 6 10
Bank New Zealand 306 15 1
Less Unpresented Cheques 27 1 0
279 14 1
Post Office Savings Bank 1,353 14 11
Petty Cash in Hand 2 6 7
Outstanding Accounts 93 19 3
Carter Bequest P.O.S.B. Account 65 6 0
Hector Memorial Fund P.O.S.B. Account 64 1 9
Hutton Memorial Fund P.O.S.B. Account 157 2 6
Hamilton Memorial Fund P.O.S.B. Account 59 11 3
Carter Library Legacy P.O.S.B. Account 34 13 2
Balance of Liabilities over Assets 287 19 8
£12,951 18 11
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New Zealand Institute.
Trust Accounts.

Carter Bequest for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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Dr.
£ s. d.
To Interest Reinvested 400 0 0
" Balance 65 6 0
£465 6 0

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Balance, 31/12/28 59 9 9
" Interest 405 16 3
£465 6 0
By Balance £65 6 0

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Hector Memorial Fund for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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Dr.
£ s. d.
To Prize 55 0 0
" Medals and Duty 16 10 1
To Balance 64 1 9
£135 11 10

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Balance, 31/12/28 64 18 11
" Interest 70 12 11
£135 11 10
By Balance £64 1 9

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Hutton Memorial Fund for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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Dr.
£ s. d.
To Research Grants 33 2 7
" Balance 157 2 6
£190 5 1

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Balance, 31/12/28 118 14 4
" Interest 71 10 9
£190 5 1
By Balance £157 2 6

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Hamilton Memorial Fund for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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Dr.
£ s. d.
To Half Interest to Capital Account 1 2 9
" Balance 2 19 9
£4 2 6

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Balance, 31/12/28 1 16 11
" Interest 2 5 7
£4 2 6
By Balance £2 19 9.

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Carter Library Legacy for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Balance, 31/12/28 25 18 0
" Interest 8 15 2
" Balance £34 13 2
– 14 –

T. K. Sidey Summer Time Fund for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Cheque from Summer Time Appreciation Committee 500 0 0
£500 0 0

Carter Library Legacy.—Public Trustee's Account for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

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£ s. d.
Residuary Capital Account 50 0 0

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Receipts.
£ s. d.
Interest, Public Trust Office:31/12/28 to 17/6/29 at 5% 1 3 0
17/6/29 to 31/12/29 at 5 1/4% 1 8 4
£2 11 4

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Disbursements.
£ s. d.
Beneficiary's Account, N.Z. Institute: Cash 2 11 4
£2 11 4

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Asset.
£ s. d.
Cash as per Capital A/c 50 0 0
£50 0 0

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Liability.
£ s. d.
Donation (payable when condition in will are complied with) 50 0 0
£50 0 0

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Certified by Public Trust Office, Masterton, 13/1/30.

Hon. Treasurer's Report and Balance Sheet: The Hon. Treasurer moved the adoption of his report and balance sheet.

On the motion of Professor Park, seconded by Professor Worley, it was resolved that the Hon. Treasurer and Hon Secretary take the necessary action to collect overdue accounts.

Report of the Research Grant Committee.

On the assumption that the usual amount of £1000 would be voted for research, applications for grants were invited in May.

Thirteen applications were received for amounts totalling £890: 10: 0. The Research Committee met in August to consider these applications and it was then notified by the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research that only £750 had been voted to cover existing grants and any new ones.

This made it necessary to restrict the granting of new applications. Accordingly only ten applications for curtailed grants, amounting to £202, were approved.

The Committee desires to place on record its deep regret at the death of its Chairman, Dr. Charles Chilton, who passed away in October.

Reports of the year's work have been received from most of the grantees, and these have been abstracted by the Assistant Secretary.

(Signed) C. Coleridge Farr,


Acting Chairman.

– 15 –

Research Grants Committee Report: On the motion of the acting Chairman of this committee, Dr. C. C. Farr, this report was adopted.

Dr. Marsden explained the position in regard to the reduced amount voted for the Institute's research grants.

Report of the Research Grantees for the Year ending 31st December, 1929.

Dr. C. E. Adams who, in 1925, was granted £200 for a research on Southern Stars and who requires an interferometer for this purpose, has now received advice from London that the interferometer could not be built for £200 and that £500 would be required. He is making further enquiries regarding the cost. None of the grant has been expended.

Mr. G. Archey who, in 1926, was granted £40 for the study of new species of N.Z. Centipedes and Millipedes, reported on 23rd December that, owing to the work entailed in connection with the removal to the new Auckland Museum, it has not been possible to do any work in his research. He proposes, however, to continue collecting this season.

He has a balance in hand of £7/13/6.

Mr. B. C. Aston who, in 1928, took over the balance of Dr. Malcolm's grant, £9/16/7, for research on pukateine, reported on 22nd November that supplies of the bark of pukatea have been sent to Professor Barger of Edinburgh, who is investigating the constituents of the contained alkaloids, and to Dr. Fogg, a student of Otago Medical School, who is going to do post-graduate work in America, and whose investigation will deal with the physiological action of pukateine.

The Institute has a balance of £6 in this grant.

Professor W. N. Benson who, in 1925, was granted £50 for preparing rock sections, reported on the 9th November that he had continued detailed mapping of parts of the Dunedin district. Microscope sections formerly paid for out of the grant were now being made in the University. Expenses amounted to £4, which leaves a balance of £27/5/0 in hands of the Institute.

Mr. A. E. Brookes who, in 1928, was granted £40 for the study of Coleoptera, reported on the 25th November that a ten-drawer insect cabinet had been imported from England for his specimens. It is proposed to spend several weeks on field work at Great Barrier Island during January.

The Institute has a balance of £30 in this grant.

Dr. K. M. Curtis who, in 1928, was granted £50 for the control of Black Rot in Hops, reported on the 1st December that laboratory work and field tests had been carried out, the latter comprising eleven methods of treatment in six hop fields applied in October and early November. Two records of treated and control hills have been taken, one prior to the treatment and the other in late November. Three more will be taken during the season and the experiments will run for about three years.

Expenditure has amounted to £45/2/4.

Mr. W. C. Davies who, in 1921, was granted £50 for research on soil bacteria, reported on 24th December that further progress has been made during the year, work being carried out on the soils of the mud flat reclamation at Wakapuaka in connection with chemical anlyses by the agricultural staff of the Cawthron Institute. The whole of the grant has been expended.

Dr. H. G. Denham who, in 1928, was granted £75 for research on essential oils of Pinus Insignus, reported on the 26th November that Mr. T. H. McCombs, a National Research scholar, has been engaged during the past nine months on the work, and he forwarded a copy of his thesis, entitled

– 16 –

“An Examination of Essential Oils (Turpentina from Pinus radiata (insignus) and Pinus pinaster (Maritima)).”

The expenditure amounts to £41/18/2 and the balance is in the hands of the Registrar of Canterbury College for disbursement.

Dr. W. P. Evans who, in 1929, was granted £35 for work on the microstructure of N.Z. Lignites, reported on the 23rd December that work upon the evidently altered lignites has been completed. Some crushed stems from Otago are now being dealt with in detail. A Leitz grinder, complete, and 0 3 h.p. inductor motor have been purchased. One paper has been published in the Journal of Science & Technology and the final article on the altered lignites is in type.

Expenditure amounts to £27/9/7, the Institute holding the balance.

Professor T. H. Easterfield who, between 1921 and 1926, was granted £100 for research on orchard fruits, reported on 24th December that the whole of the grant had been expended and during the last two years additional funds have been supplied from the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research. The results of the work will shortly be issued in the form of a Bulletin.

Dr. C. Coleridge Farr who, in 1921, was granted £15 for research on the physical properties of gas free sulphur, reported on the 23rd November that he and Mr. McLeod are making a determination on the latent heat of gas free sulphur, values of which by various experiments vary greatly. A successful determination has already been made but further work is necessary to confirm it. There has been no expenditure and the Institute holds a balance of £4/18/1.

Professor D. C. H. Florance, who, in 1928, was granted £38 and in 1929 an additional £20 for oscillation crystals and supersonic waves, reported on the 2nd December that the apparatus incorporating a crystal oscillator as used by the research worker, Mr. F. G. White, has been modified so that measurements might be made of the velocity of sound waves of high frequency in mixtures of air and carbon dioxide. The effect of humidity and also of any departure from the plane wave condition on the measured velocity of sound was investigated. It is intended to measure the velocity of high frequency sound waves in ionised gases.

The largest crystal was used in an investigation of the nodal patterns on the surface of the oscillating crystal. A preliminary account of the work was published in the Philosophical Magazine and further accounts have been prepared.

Expenditure amounts to £34/9/5.

Dr. Hilgendorf, who, in 1926, was granted £50 for a calculating machine, reported on 23rd November that the machine is being used daily for wheat, pasture, manurial and herd-testing trials and that it is in good order. He also reports that the camera loaned to him in connection with wheat research is in daily use.

Dr. J. K. H. Inglis, who, between 1923 and 1929, has been granted £105 for research on essential oils, reported on 30th November that the researches had been continued during the past year on N.Z. rata, pepper plant, rimu, totara and white pine. The large plant still that has been used for this work has considerably corroded and must be replaced in part by a tinned copper vessel.

The Institute has a balance of £20.

Mr. F. V. Knapp, who, in 1925, was granted £25 for research on Maori Artifacts, reported on 14th December that nothing has been done this year owing to ill health. He leaves for England early next year and will not be able to resume until 1931.

The Institute has in hand a balance of £15/6/0.

– 17 –

Mr. R. M. Laing, who, in 1924, was granted £100 and in 1929 an additional £25 for research on N.Z. Algae, reported on 23rd November that algological collections have been made at various places, and a paper entitled “A Reference List of N.Z. Marine Algae, Supplement 1,” has been sent in for publication. This deals chiefly, but not solely, with Delesseriaceae. These have been revised by Dr. Kyln of Lund, from a collection sent home by Mr. Laing. A new genus, Laingia, has been established, and several new species described.

His paper in the Transactions on the N.Z. species of Gigartina has led to considerable correspondence with Dr. Hercus of the Otago Medical School, Dr. Holloway and several domestic science instructors, regarding edible seaweeds and their valuable iodine content. Analyses of various species of Gigartina have been made by Dr. Hercus, and reports thereon published. A second paper on the foliose forms of N.Z. Gigartina will be ready for publication shortly.

The Institute has a balance of £23/15/0.

Mr. A. Philpott, who, in 1928, was granted £40 for research on the Lepidoptera of Mt. Cook district, reported on 21st November that he made one visit to Mt. Cook and collected about 600 specimens covering about 145 species. Beyond a rough sorting no work has been done on the material as another trip is contemplated, when the material will then be worked out and results embodied in a paper.

Expenditure to date is £14/19/4.

Mr. A. W. B. Powell, who, in 1925, was granted £50 for a survey of the molluscan fauna in Manukau Harbour, reported on the 27th November that a paper entitled “New Species of N.Z. Mollusca from Shallow Water Dredgings,” Part 1, has been completed and sent in to the Editor. Good progress has been made with the survey of Manukau Harbour fauna and results will probably be completed next year. The balance of the grant will be expended on literature.

The Institute has a balance of £4.

Mr. W. F. Short, who, between 1925 and 1929, was granted £189 for research on the constitution of N.Z. Essential Oils, reported on 30th November that further supplies of the Sesquiterpene aromadendrene have been obtained from two eucalyptus oils, namely, those of E. globulus and E. roriflora and the results of the investigation are being published conjointly with Mr. A. R. Penfold, of the Technological Museum, Sydney, who is examining the low boiling constituents of the oil of E. rariflora. Further results in the examination of Leptospermol are also being obtained.

There is an unexpended balance of £9/6/10.

Mr. H. F. Skey, who, in 1926, took over from Captain Isitt £36/10/9 and in 1927 was granted an additional £175 for Upper Air research, reported on the 30th November that up to date 50 single pilot balloon flights and two double theodolite flights have been observed. The latter demonstrated the practical reliability of the ascension rate used in computation of the single theodolite flights. They were interrupted by the loan to the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research of a theodolite for work in Auckland. It is a matter for congratulation that upper air currents are now observed in three centres in New Zealand—Christchurch, Auckland and Wellington—and when correlation with the synoptic charts is accomplished, valuable results should emerge.

Mr. Skey will in future be able to carry out the work more systematically and he expects to publish the data of the second 100 flights in Volume 6 of the Records of the Survey of New Zealand.

Professor R. Speight, who, in 1928, was granted £50 for Geological work in Mt. Somers district, reported on 22nd November that examinations carried on as occasion offered had been nearly completed, only two small areas needing investigation. The general stratigraphical problems arising in connection with the geological structure have been fully considered. Analyses of typical and volcanic rocks have been made by the Dominion Laboratory, and a visit paid to the area by the Government Palaeontologist, Dr. J. Marwick.

– 18 –

A commencement has been made with the geological mapping of the area, and this has been completed as far as the Clent Hills is concerned.

Grantee has a balance in hand of £24/10/0.

Mr. F. J. Turner, who, in 1928, was granted £100 for a geological expedition to Red Hills country in South Westland, reported on November 28 that this expedition was made with the assistance of Mr. W. E. La Roche, B.Sc., of the Auckland Grammar School, and Mr. G. J. Williams, M.Sc., F.G.S., research student at Otago University, and took from January 5 to February 8. The weather conditions were exceptionally bad, their guide losing two horses in crossing flooded rivers and a third horse being killed in a slip. A paper dealing with the geological features of this area has been completed and will be submitted for publication in the Transactions. The whole of the grant was expended.

Dr. G. H. Uttley, who, in 1928, was granted £35 for micrographic apparatus for research on Bryozoa, reported on 1st December that descriptions of new and little known species of Bryozoa (Recent and fossil) have been nearly completed and the work of illustrating these with photographs is being carried on at present. There is a balance of £7.

Professor F. P. Worley, who, in 1923 and 1925, was granted £50 for a research on the chemistry of essential oils, reported on the 21st November that a research on the essential oil of Mclicope ternata has been completed and the results published in a paper in Volume 60 of the Transactions. Institute has in hand a balance of £10/13/0.

No reports have been received from Dr. Allan, Dr. G. H. Cunningham, Mr. Foster, Mr. H. Hamilton, Research Committee of Auckland Institute, Messrs. Wild & Tankersley, and Messrs. Wild & Zotov.

Tongariro National Park.
Report of the New Zealand Institute's Representative on Park Board.

The year 1929 will be memorable in the history of the Tongariro National Park for the fact that the arrangements mentioned in my last report (p. 14, Part 1, Volume 60, 1929 Trans. N.Z. Inst.) for the erection of an up-to-date hostel in the Park, have been successfully carried out, the building having been erected and thrown open to the public in November last.

The negotiations by which this desirable state of things has been accomplished are largely due to the business ability of the Chairman of the Board, Mr. J. B. Thomson.

In his annual report to Parliament (C. — 13, 1929), Mr. Thomson quotes with approval some words of the Right Hon. Stanley Baldwin to a Welsh audience on St. David's Day, 1927: “You have a beautiful country in Wales. Don't let strangers spoil it for you and don't spoil it yourselves. Educate public opinion, educate your local authorities and bear in mind the example of New Zealand, a new country with a small population, which is already scheduling a magnificent region in the North Island and reserving it for all time as a national park. This is a wise economy of nature.”

With such an ideal in view it is to be hoped that there will be no obstacle to prevent the Board from adopting a policy which will preserve the natural features of the Park for all time, secure from desecration by the hands of the tourist, competing species, or exotic animals.

As some 25,000 visitors may be expected to visit the Park annually, there is room for the exercise of considerable supervision by the custodian.

The report is attached; it gives details of the progress made during the year, with a full-paged drawing of the hostel.

Three meetings of the Board or Executive Committee have been held during the year, but the Board's strength has been sadly diminished by the deaths of three most valuable members—Messrs. W. Salt, A. G. Simpson and B. M. Wilson, all active workers for the progress of the Park as a national institution.

(Signed) B. C. Aston.

– 19 –

Tongariro National Park: On the motion of Mr. B. C. Aston, the Institute's representative on the Park Board, the report was adopted. The Hon. G. M. Thomson reported that he had written to the Chairman of the Tongariro National Park Board suggesting certain names recommended by the Standing Committee and had received a sympathetic letter in reply stating that when any future vacancies occurred on the Park Board the wishes of the Institute would be considered.

Great Barrier Reef Committee.

Four meetings were held during the year.

Several reports on the work of the Great Barrier Reef Expedition were submitted by the Leader, Dr. O. M. Yonge, and the other members of the Expedition.

The camp on Low Island was evacuated on July 28th, 1929, being one year and 12 days after the Expedition arrived. Practically all the original programme of the Expedition has been completed, much of it in greater detail than was originally intended. The scientific work accomplished by the Expedition included investigations into the distribution of plankton, tracing the life-history of reef building corals, observations on the effect of sediment on corals, an ecological survey of Low Island, including both the land vegetation and the coral region, an investigation of the breeding seasons of common animals, study of the growth rate of corals and of respiration and photosynthesis in corals and observations on the physical properties of the sea water.

The economic work of the Expedition included investigations into the life-histories of Trochus, Pearl shells, beche-de-mer, oysters and certain fishes.

The marine Biological work on the Barrier Reef initiated by the Expedition will be carried on by the Queensland Government.

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Financial Statement, October 18th, 1929.
£ s. d.
Receipts 1807 3 2
Expenditure 15 9 9
Balance £1791 13 5

(Signed) W. R. B. Oliver,


N.Z. Institute Representative,
Great Barrier Reef Committee.

Great Barrier Reef Committee's Report: On the motion of Mr. W. R. B. Oliver, the report was adopted.

Report of the Publication Committee.

A change of Editor took place at the beginning of 1929, Mr. Johannes C. Andersen having found it necessary to relinquish the position after nine years of valuable service.

Volume 59 was completed by the late Editor, Part 4 being issued on 28th March, 1929. It was an exceptionally large volume, consisting of 1024 pages and 120 plates. The papers numbered 55 by 48 authors. Details of the first three parts were given in last year's report. Part 4 contained iv plus 362 plus xii pages, and 43 plates.

For Volume 60, 75 papers by 53 authors were submitted, of which 23 by 10 authors, were either declined, or sent back for revision and not resubmitted. Part 1 contains 204 pages and 17 plates; Part 2, 174 pages and

– 20 –

15 plates; Part 3, 142 pages and 27 plates; being a total for the three parts of 520 pages and 59 plates. Part 4 is in preparation.

A proposal is being considered to divide the editorial work among a small committee according to subjects. It is, of course, impossible for a single Editor to be conversant with all the branches of science represented in the published papers, or to be in touch with all the best authorities who are available as referees.

For the Publication Committee,

(Signed) D. M. Y. Sommerville.

Publication Matters: The report of the Honorary Editor was adopted. Professor Sommerville reported that he would be willing to carry on as Honorary Editor if he were given assistance. Mr. Wright moved and Professor Easterfield second “That Professor Sommerville be appointed Honorary Editor with two or more assistant associate editors.”

Dr. Cockayne moved as an amendment “That Professor Sommerville be appointed Editor with three or more assistant associate editors.” This amendment on being put to the meeting was lost. Mr. Wright's motion was then carried.

On the motion of Dr. Marsden, seconded by Professor Worley, it was resolved that Mr. W. R. B. Oliver and Dr. J. Marwick be appointed assistant associate editors.

Professor Easterfield moved that any further names be brought by the Honorary Editor before the Standing Committee which had the power of appointment. This was carried.

Reference List of Scientific Periodicals: Many members spoke of the value of the Reference List and some discussion took place as to whether a supplementary list should be printed or whether the List should be revised and reprinted. Professor Worley moved and Professor Easterfield seconded “That the question of reprinting the Reference List of Scientific Periodicals prepared by Mr. Archey be considered by the Standing Committee with power to act with the suggestion that the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research be approached and asked for its co-operation and financial assistance in the matter.” On being put to the meeting this motion was lost.

Report of Honorary Librarian.

The conditions of library accommodation continue to grow more congested, and there seems to be little prospect of immediate relief. It is a great convenience to many of the regular readers to have the library of the Institute housed at Victoria University College, but it seems inevitable that this arrangement cannot endure unless the College itself is extended. The Chairman of the Victoria College Library Committee, who is also your Honorary Librarian, reports that the College library itself is in urgent need of extended accommodation. It is most desirable that the present relations of co-operation should continue as long as possible, and it is hoped that more library accommodation at the College may be created.

During the year there have been a few new exchanges. Further sets have been got ready for binding.

The Index of Scientific Periodicals in New Zealand Libraries, which was prepared by Mr. Archey, has proved of great use in assisting readers

– 21 –

to find the periodicals which they require, and has helped to extend the use of the library. It is already, however, in need of considerable revision and extension.

(Signed) D. M. Y. Sommerville,


Honorary Librarian.

Honorary Librarian's Report: This report was adopted.
Fourth Pacific Science Congress.
Dr. J. S. Maclaurin's Report.

I have been requested to report briefly on the Fourth Pacific Science Congress, which I attended as a representative of the New Zealand Government and of the Institute.

Owing to no accommodation being available on the Dutch steamer sailing from Sydney to Java on April 20th, I had to take passage on a steamer leaving Fremantle on May 3rd and consequently was too late to attend the opening meeting of the Congress, which was held at Batavia on the 16th May. I was, however, in time for the remaining meetings which were held in Bandoeng. These meetings were largely attended, and, so far as I could judge, were very successful. The number of delegates and guests from abroad was said to exceed 250, and the number of papers presented was about 270.

All papers were in English, but the Council was asked to allow French as an alternative language in future congresses. It was, however, decided to adhere to the important principle, adopted at the second Congress, that only one language should be allowed.

The meetings continued till the 24th May. A final Council Meeting was held on the afternoon of that day and a final general meeting on the morning of Saturday, the 25th, at which a short address was given by the President and a number of votes of thanks were proposed by members of the Council, including one to Her Majesty the Queen of the Netherlands, proposed by your representative.

At the final Council Meeting it was decided inter alia that the Fifth Pacific Science Congress should be held at Vancouver.

With regard to the social side of the Congress, the arrangements for the entertainment of visitors were excellent, the Dutch treated their guests most hospitably and numerous excursions of scientific interest were well carried out. Of those which I attended the most interesting was one to the hot springs in the Pasehkawa-Kamojang district, followed next day by one to the observation station on Papandajan mountain. At the former I saw steam under high pressure issuing from iron pipes which tapped some of the steam “blowers,” and was informed that the pipes had been in position for about two years and were not appreciably corroded. At present there is sufficient cheap water-power to meet the requirements of the district, but as these requirements increase it is expected that the steam pressure now going to waste will be converted into power.

The observation station at Papandajan is about 1000 feet above the floor of the crater, where numerous boiling pools and steam “blowers” indicate considerable thermal action. At the station two seismographs are installed, one for measuring the horizontal and the other the vertical component of earthquake shocks and daily readings are taken of the temperature of one of the hottest steam vents in the floor of the crater by means of a thermocouple fixed at a depth of about six feet. The temperature on the day of our visit was said to be about 500°C.! It is, therefore, not surprising that the observation station has been placed 1000 feet above this potential volcano.

(Signed) J. S. Maclaurin.

Fourth Pacific Science Congress. Dr. Marshall's Report.

Having been appointed delegate of the New Zealand Institute, I left Wellington on April 5th, and arrived in Sydney April 9th, leaving again

– 22 –

on April 13th in the Dutch steamer “Nieuw Zeeland,” in company with eleven delegates to the Congress from Australia. We were treated with great courtesy by the Commander and officers throughout the voyage and were enabled to understand many points of the features and geography of the islands that we passed which, under ordinary circumstances, would have been overlooked. The steamer called at Brisbane but passed through Torres Strait without stopping at Thursday Island. We steamed close to the eastern coast of Timor and various small islands before reaching Celebes, where we called at Macassar. After spending a day there we sailed for Java and reached Surabaya on April 25th. We afterwards stopped at Samarang and Cheribon before reaching Batavia on May 1st. Rooms had already been engaged for us at the Hotel des Indes, where we found some delegates from America. On May 4th the excursions to Krakatoa in the Straits of Sunda, took place. The Government of the Netherlands Indies placed two steamers at the disposal of the Congress. The various points of interest in connection with the greatest volcanic explosion of late years were visited. Members of various technical departments of the Government of the Netherlands Indies gave lectures on special features of the Krakatoa eruption as affecting different aspects of scientific research. We arrived back at Batavia early on May 6th and later on the same day visited the coral reefs in the Bay of Batavia in company with those Government specialists who had studied them.

On May 7th the Governor-General gave an official reception to the delegates in the new buildings of the Law schools. On the evening of May 8th the Governor-General gave a social reception to the delegates and dignitaries of the Netherlands Indies at the Palace. On May 9th the members of the Congress visited the Botanical Gardens at Buitenzorg and afterwards journeyed to Bandoeng. Bandoeng is situated in central Java at an elevation of 1500 feet. It is a modern town where several of the Government departments have their headquarters, as the climate is more suited to Europeans than that of any of the sea coast towns.

The sessions of the Congress were held at Bandoeng in the Technical High School from May 12-18. The formal sessions were held in the morning from 8.30 to 12.30. Committee meetings were held in the afternoons, and there were also local excursions and festivities in the evenings. The available accommodation in the hotels of Bandoeng was rather over-taxed and delegates whose names were sent in late were quartered at some distance from the town.

There were more than 200 delegates, the contingents from Japan and from China being the largest. There were two delegates from Great Britain, two from Canada, and one from South America. French Indo China, the Federated Malay States, and the Philippines were well represented. There were many delegates from the United States of America and, as before stated, there were eleven from Australia.

The Geological section was well attended throughout, as many as 100 delegates attending the discussion on coral reefs. The subjects that came up for discussion were mainly those associated with volcanic action. Distribution of coal and oil was the subject of another series of papers. There was a number of papers on coastal movements of elevation and depression in countries bordering the Pacific Ocean. I was allotted the rather unenviable task of making a digest of all those relating to the Southern Pacific and of presenting it to the Congress. Since this involved the condensation of closely reasoned papers already reduced to the their minimum by their distinguished authors, the task was by no means easy.

The discussions in the Geological section proved rather disappointing on the whole. Though English was the only language admitted in the discussions, many of the delegates experienced difficulty in fully appreciating the points that were raised by the authors and also in expressing themselves adequately in the language used. While this difficulty will remain in the formal sessions, though it will probably become less pronounced in time, it does not obtrude itself in the same measure in the informal discussions outside the actual meetings.

– 23 –

One was enabled to meet many investigators of distinction and to gain impressions of their personal experiences and of the manner in which they approach problems of research which will be of extreme value. Information was gained that could never have been derived from mere reading. Such meetings greatly stimulate research and give an opportunity of obtaining points of view that would otherwise be entirely missed.

At Bandoeng the delegates were given opportunities of visiting the high-power wireless station, observatory, and tea estates and the creater of Papandajang.

At the final meeting at Bandoeng it was decided that the next meeting of the Congress should be held in Vancouer, and it was understood that the succeeding one would be held in French Indo China.

From Bandoeng excursions of the various sections diverged in different directions, but all sections met again three days later at Jakjakarta, where the great Buddhist Temple of Boroboedoer, 1200 years old, and various other Hindoo temples were visited. The Sultan of Jakjakarta entertained the members of the Congress at a performance of Javan dances in the large open reception room of his palace.

Seven days were given to further excursions. Arrangements had been made for the members of each section to visit localities where objects of special interest in the particular science they studied were to be found. The Geological section, for instance, was able to visit and make a special study of the effects of the activity of many of the volcanoes, which, in recent times, have caused great disasters in several of the populous districts. These proved of great interest and offered explanations of many volcanic phenomena in New Zealand which had not previously been understood. In particular the great Keloet volcano and the striking caldera of the Tengger mountain were visited. On June 4th the members of the Congress assembled at Sourabaya, where the President entertained them at a dinner.

I should like, in conclusion, to make special reference to the generous and thoughtful hospitality and courtesy which were extended to us by all sections of the community throughout our visit. His Excellency the Governor-General entertained us and emphasised the importance that he attached to the meeting of the Congress in Java. The members of Government departments were solicitous in their attentions, and we had unique opportunities of studying the interesting scientific features of Java.

To the members of the various scientific institutions of Java special thanks are due for the painstaking care they showed in explaining to us the various objects of interest.

(Signed) P. Marshall.

Fourth Pacific Science Congress: On the motion of Dr. Marsden, seconded by Mr. G. V. Hudson, the reports of the delegates were received.

The meeting adjourned at 12.45 p.m. for lunch.

Science Congress, 1931: Professor Easterfield explained the reasons why Nelson Institute could not undertake to organise the Science Congress for 1931, chief of these being the lack of accommodation in Nelson during the summer months.

On the motion of the Hon. G. M. Thomson, seconded by Professor Park, it was resolved that the matter be left in the hands of the Standing Committee to enquire into the possibility of its being held in Napier and with power to act.

Annual Meeting, 1931: On the motion of Mr. Eliott, seconded by Mr. Hudson, it was resolved “That unless the Act be amended in sufficient time to allow of the alteration in date the Annual Meeting be held on the last Thursday in January.

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National Research Council.
Report of Sub-committee (Dr. C. C. Farr & Mr. A. M. Wright).

With reference to the reports received on the proposed National Research Council from the different Institutes, we, your sub-committee, would now comment as follows:—

We have perused the replies received from the various affiliated societies, and we are pleased to notice that in every Institute, with the exception of Otago, the formation of a National Research Council has been generally approved.

We are prepared to accept the scheme outlined by the Auckland Institute, omitting all reference to the proposed Section No. 11.

We also recommend that for each of the ten sections no section should have a greater number of members than 10.

We, therefore, submit this scheme for discussion at the meeting of the Board of Governors in January next.

(Signed) A. M. Wright


C. Coleridge Farr.

The scheme referred to above is as follows:—

1. In order to include on the body all who could profitably serve, the number of members should be much increased, a limit being fixed at, say, 75 or 100 without, however, the necessity of actually reaching that limit. A limit should similarly be fixed for each section with a similar proviso. The limit need not be the same for different sections, but no section should have a limit greater than, say, 10. In some sections, e.g., Anthropology and Ethnology, it may not be possible to obtain more than two or three members.

2. Each section should be constituted a sub-committee of the main body and should appoint one of its members convener and secretary.

3. Problems requiring consideration may concern one, two or more sub-committees. Each sub-committee should consider, in general by correspondence, any problem within its sphere before joint consideration by the various sub-committees concerned.

4. When a meeting of a sub-committee or a conjoint meeting of two or more sub-committees is required, the total number of representatives attending such meeting should be limited to say six. In the case of two sections three from each, and of three sections, two from each, etc.

5. Meetings of the whole body should rarely, if ever, be required. There should, however, be an executive body consisting of one member of each sub-committee, preferably the convener or his nominee, which could meet to consider matters of general policy.

6. Sections: In addition to the 10 sections named in the report, it is desirable to have a section (11) representing manufacturing industries. The sections would then be:—

(1)

Agriculture and Veterinary Science

(2)

Anthropology and Ethnology

(3)

Astronomy, Mathematics, Seismology and Meteorology.

(4)

Botany, Forestry and Zoology

(5)

Chemistry and Metallurgy

(6)

Economics and Statistics

(7)

Engineering and Mining

(8)

Geography and Geology

(9)

Mental Science and Education

(10)

Medical Science, Physiology and Pathology

(11)

Manufacturing Industries.

7. Election of members: In sections 1 to 6 and 8 and 9 the representatives could in the first instance be elected by the professors and independent lecturers of the respective subjects in the University of New Zealand, together with Fellows of the New Zealand Institute who owe their Fellowship to the work in the section in which they vote. No elector should vote in more than one section.

In sections 7 and 10 the first election could be as suggested in the report, viz., by N.Z. Society of Engineers and the N.Z. Branch of the British Medical Association.

In section 11 suggested the representatives could be elected by sections 1, 4, 5 and 7 conjointly.

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National Research Council: On the motion of Professor Worley, seconded by Mr. Oliver, it was resolved “That the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute approves the formation of a Research Council of the New Zealand Institute capable of functioning as a National Research Council.”

On the motion of Dr. Marsden, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved “That the proposed National Research Council be constituted round a nucleus of the Fellows of the New Zealand Institute, modification of whose constitution to be considered if necessary, and that the proposed council be intended as a non-Government body ready at all times to consider or inaugurate scientific proposals of national interest or concern or to co-operate with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research established under the Act of 1926.”

On the motion of Professor Worley, seconded by Mr. Wright, it was resolved “That the proposed Research Council be constituted on the lines of the scheme submitted by the Auckland Institute.”

T. K. Sidey Summer Time Fund: Sir Thomas Sidey had expressed a wish to be present at the meeting when the proposed regulations were to be discussed and he attended at 3 p.m. Dr. Farr in welcoming Sir Thomas Sidey expressed the appreciation of the Board at his presence and at his action in entrusting the Institute with the administration of the T. K. Sidey Fund. He suggested that in view of the recent honour which had been bestowed on the Hon. Mr. Sidey, the title of the fund might be altered to the Sir Thomas Sidey Summer Time Fund.

Sir Thomas in thanking Dr. Farr stated he was not sure that the Summer Time Appreciation Committee would approve of the suggestion, but that he himself had no objection. He suggested that the committee be consulted in the matter.

Dr. Farr then read the draft of the proposed Deed of Trust.

On the motion of the Hon. G. M. Thomson, seconded by Mr. Eliott, this was adopted.

The Rules and Regulations were then read and discussed and adopted as follows:—

No. 1. The fund placed in the hands of the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute by the Summer Time Appreciation Committee shall be called the “T. K. Sidey Summer Time Fund.” Such fund shall consist of the money originally subscribed and any further moneys which may be subsequently donated.

No. 2. The fund shall be vested in the Institute. The Board of Governors shall have the control of the said moneys and shall invest the same in any securities proper for trust moneys.

No. 3. The object of the fund shall be the encouragement of Scientific Research on the subject of light and solar radiations generally, in their relation to human welfare.

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No. 4. A bronze medal donated by the Hon. Sir Thomas Sidey and a monetary prize of not less than £100 shall be awarded from time to time by the Board of Governors of the New Zealand Institute for the best contribution on the subject as aforesaid.

No. 5. The Board of Governors may specify a particular branch of the subject on which the award is to be made.

No. 6. [Some discussion arose regarding this proposed regulation and finally on the motion of Dr. Marsden, seconded by Professor Segar, it was resolved that the matter be referred to a committee with power to act. On the motion of Dr. Marsden, seconded by Professor Worley, it was resolved that the committee should be the Hon. G. M. Thomson, Dr. Farr, Professor Easterfield, Dr. Marsden (convener) and Dr. J. Malcolm.]

No. 7. The first award may be made at the Annual Meeting of the Board in 1931.

No. 8. Whenever possible the medal shall be presented in some public manner.

Sir Thomas Sidey stated that he would like the first award to be made in 1931, and he would be willing to make up the amount necessary for the prize, and also that in order that the fund might not be depleted he wished to donate the medal which he understood would cost about £100. Applause.

Fellowship N.Z. Institute: In his presidential address Dr Farr referred to the need for reform in the existing mode of selection of Fellows. On the motion of Dr. Marsden, seconded by Professor Worley, it was resolved “That a committee consisting of the President, Hon. G. M. Thomson, Dr. Marsden and Mr. Oliver (convener) be appointed to report to the annual meeting on the method of election of Fellows of the New Zealand Institute.”

Amendments to Act: On the motion of Professor Park, seconded by Professor Worley, it was resolved that the necessary action in connection with the amendments to the Act be taken by the Standing Committee.

Change of Title of N.Z. Institute: On the motion of Mr. Aston, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved “That the Standing Committee take steps to ascertain what procedure would be necessary to incorporate the word “Royal” as part of the title of this Institute.”

Survey Ship “Carnegie”: On the motion of Dr. Marsden, seconded by Professor Easterfield, it was resolved “That this Institute place on record its appreciation of the work done for science and navigation by the Survey Ship ‘Carnegie,’ and expresses its deepest regret at the loss of the vessel and extends its condolence and sympathy to the wife and family of its distinguished commander, Capt Ault, who was killed when the vessel was lost.”

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Scenery Preservation: On the motion of Professor Worley, seconded by Dr. Marsden, it was resolved “That a committee consisting of Dr. Cockayne (convener), Mr. Aston, Mr. Oliver and Mr. Hudson be set up to deal with the matter of scenery preservation.”

A.A.A.S. Delegates: The matter of electing delegates to attend the meeting of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science to be held in Brisbane in May, was left to the Standing Committee.

National Parks: On the motion of Dr. Cockayne, seconded by the Hon. G. M. Thomson, it was resolved: “That the Department of Lands and Survey be requested to allow this Institute to elect a member to the Arthur's Pass Park Board and to the Mount Egmont Park Board.”

Finance: On the motion of Mr. Eliott, seconded by Mr. Aston, it was resolved “That a finance committee be appointed who shall decide each year on the amount that is to be spent on printing the Transactions and other publications.” The committee to be Mr. Eliott (convener), Mr. Aston, Dr. Cockayne, Dr. Marsden and the President ex officio.

Observatories' Committee: Dr. Farr read the report of the Institute's representatives on this committee. It was resolved to reappoint the committee, Dr. Farr, Professors Burbidge and Sommerville and Mr. A. C. Gifford.

Election of Officers: President, Dr. C. Coleridge Farr, relected; Hon Secretary, Mr. B. C. Aston, re-elected; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. M. A. Eliott, re-elected; Hon. Librarian, Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville, re-elected; Hon. Editor, Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville with Dr. J. Marwick and Mr. W. R. B. Oliver assistant associate editors; Hon. Returning Officer, Professor H. W. Segar; Managers Trust Accounts, Messrs. B. C. Aston and M. A. Eliott; Representative Great Barrier Reef Committee, Mr. W. R. B. Oliver; Representative Institute of Horticulture, Mr. B. C. Aston.

Election of Committees: Research Committee, Dr. Farr, Mr. A. M. Wright, Professor Speight, Dr. Denham and Dr. Hilgendorf, re-elected.

Hector Award Committee: Mr. B. C. Aston (convener), Professors Easterfield and Robertson.

Library Committee: Professors Sommerville, Kirk and Cotton, re-elected.

Finance Committee: Mr. Eliott (convener), Mr. Aston, Dr. Cockayne, Dr. Marsden and President (ex officio).

Travelling Expenses: It was resolved that travelling expenses be paid.

Votes of Thanks: Votes of thanks were passed to the Assistant Secretary, Miss Wood, and to Victoria College Council and Professor Kirk for the use of his room for the meeting. Also to the Press.