Go to National Library of New Zealand Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa
Volume 61, 1930
This text is also available in PDF
(1 MB) Opens in new window
– 419 –

The Lepidoptera of Mount Cook District, with Descriptions of New Species.

[Read before the Auckland Institute, 25th February, 1930; received by Editor, 4th March, 1930; issued separately, 23rd August, 1930.]

Historical.

The first lepidopterist to collect in the neighbourhood of Mount Cook was Mr. R. W. Fereday, who visited the locality in February, 1888. There is no record of the time spent in the district, but as a result of Mr. Fereday's work six new species were described by Mr. E. Meyrick in the Transactions of the Entomological Society of London for 1901. Early in December 1899, Mr. G. V. Hudson stayed at the old “Hermitage” for five days. Inclement weather interfered with the full success of the trip, but Mr. Hudson formed a high opinion of the entomological possibilities of the region, an account of which he gave in his presidential address to the Wellington Philosophical Society (1900).

In 1909 (?) Mr. T. Hall collected coleoptera in the neighbourhood and while so engaged captured a specimen, now in the Auckland Museum, of Dasyuris austrina Philp. About the middle of March, 1923, Dr. R. J. Tillyard stayed for a day or two at the “Hermitage” and, though not giving special attention to the lepidoptera, succeeded in capturing a new species of Simaethis—subsequently named after him by the writer—and a good series of the rather local butterfly, Erebia butleri Fered.

With Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lindsay, the writer spent from 28th December, 1928, to 7th January, 1929, in camp near the “Hermitage.” The weather was rather broken but large collections were made. Returning alone on the 7th of the following February, he made a stay of 13 days, during which period no rain fell though collecting was somewhat interfered with on several days by strong winds. Finally, a visit was made in the early part of December, 1929, the period covering from the 6th to the 17th. The weather, for the most part, was cold and wet and more than half of the time was spent in enforced idleness.

The expenses of the last two visits to the locality were defrayed by a Research Grant from the N.Z. Institute, for which assistance the writer tenders his grateful thanks.

In accordance with the conditions covering the grant, the material collected has been equally divided between the Canterbury Museum, the Dominion Museum and the Cawthron Institute.*

[Footnote] *It is fitting that a note of appreciation of the generosity of the Curator (Professor R. Speight) of the Canterbury Museum should here be recorded. The Research Grant regulations provide that all specimens obtained by the aid of a grant shall become the property of a Museum or University College within the province where the collections are made. By waiving his rights in the matter Professor Speight has enabled two other institutions to become possessed of a fairly extensive and representative collection of the Lepidoptera of Mount Cook.

– 420 –

Notes on the Collecting Localities.

Speaking generally, daylight collecting of lepidoptera in the Mount Cook district does not yield abundant results. There is a rather poor representation of those families—such as the Gelechiidae and Glyphipterygidae—which are attached to open country and lowly herbage, and as there is a very large proportion of this class of country in the neighbourhood of Mount Cook the effect is marked. Probably the general high elevation (the “Hermitage” is situated at 2,500 ft.) and the amount of snowfall militates against those species which have their habitat under the conditions just mentioned; the annual melting of the snow, with its accompaniments of excessive moisture and damage to vegetation, could hardly have any other effect. But the comparative poolness of the day collecting is amply made up for by the abundance of species to be obtained after dark, either by means of netting by lamplight, collecting from certain blossoms or by the attraction of sugared bait.

A detailed description of the chief localities follows.

Governor's Bush.—This is the only piece of bush of any extent in the district. It clothes the spur which runs down to the Black Birch Stream and a few hundred yards before the “Hermitage” is reached a fine track winds up this spur and crosses it to run down to the Baby Glacier Valley, where a crossing can be made for the ascent of Sebastopol Spur. The chief forest tree on the lower part of the track is Nothofagus Menziesii, but this gives place to Phyllocladus alpinus and Podocarpus Halli towards the top of the spur. Here the bush is of lower growth, so that at several points there is an almost unobstructed view of the valley opposite. This upper part of the track is especially favourable to collecting by sugared bait, the contrast between the few specimens attracted in the beech forest and the abundant attendance in the upper stretch being most marked. Just before the track reaches the Black Birch Stream there is a grove of Hoheria glabrata which, when in flower (in February), attracts moths in great numbers. On the whole, the neighbourhood of this glabrata grove affords the best bush-collecting to be had, there being here a greater variety of vegetation than elsewhere.

If, instead of taking the bush track, the base of the spur is followed round towards the mouth of the Black Birch Stream gorge, a very favourable spot for collecting will be found. In a sheltered corner, just before the stream is reached, there is a small area of flat ground covered with more or less open forest. The chief trees are Podocarpus Halli, Phyllocladus alpinus and Griselinia littoralis, the more shrubby species being Coprosma spp. and Hoheria glabrata. A very robust growth of the fern, Polystichum vestitum, borders the base of the hill and extends to all the more shaded parts. In this restricted spot lepidoptera are abundant and both day and evening collecting prove satisfactory. The usually rather rare Chloroclystis punicea was abundant here at the flowers of a species of Hebe.

Governor's Bush extends along the lower slope of the mountain behind the “Hermitage” and here another track, the Glencoe Walk, provides access to the forest. Along the base of the hill between these two tracks are several more or less open glades, which form

– 421 –

convenient beats for the collector. Not far beyond the “Hermitage” the heavily timbered forest gives place to a more scrubby growth and this, as it extends out into the valley, becomes mixed with a large proportion of Discaria (Wild Irishman), forming a rather unfavourable association for lepidoptera.

Track to Kea Point and Vicinity.—The Kea Point track commences at the “Hermitage” and almost at once leads through a small patch of low bush consisting chiefly of Phyllocladus alpinus and Coprosma spp. This part of the track may be profitably worked by evening collecting, or by “sugaring” in the proper season. It may be mentioned here that “sugaring” proved quite ineffective in December and most attractive in February. AFter leaving this bush open scrub and tussock is passed through till the track leads on to an old moraine. Here there is a profusion of Ranunculus Lyallii and other subalpine plants, forming a good collecting field. Beyond Kea Point the track descends to the Mueller Glacier and presents no further entomological attractions.

About halfway to Kea Point, on the right of the track, is an isolated rounded knoll, and a little farther on lies the site of the old “Hermitage.” At both of these localities there is a good variety of native shrubs and lepidoptera are in consequence fairly plentiful. On the knoll there are many plants of Dracophyllum longifolium* and of Hebe spp. and these, when in flower, would doubtless repay attention.

Sealey Range.—The writer did not investigate this locality, but Mr. G. V. Hudson “found insects (in December) very abundant up to about 3,800 ft.” Above that altitude there was much snow lying and insects were practically absent. Probably a month or two later the locality would be fairly prolific up to at least 5,000 feet.

Hooker Valley.—The Hooker Valley forms a fine field for the collector. Between the two swing bridges extensive banks of shingle form easy spots for the capture of Erebia merula and such other species as are attached to such habitats. Beyond the second bridge the valley floor consists of tussock country, mixed with scrub-covered areas. A good track runs up the valley for 7 or 8 miles, ending at the Hooker Hut. Though the valley can be worked from the “Hermitage” it would save much time if the collector arranged to occupy the hut for a few nights; this would allow of evening work in the upper portion of the area.

Mount Franklin.—Directly opposite the “Hermitage” lies Mount Franklin, which divides the Hooker and Tasman Valleys. Along the Hooker side, a few feet above the river, runs an old track both sides of which are fringed, in many places, with shrubs of Hebe, Dracophyllum and Carmichaelia, forming a very good field for either day or evening collecting. For several hundred yards upstream from the bridge the river does not ordinarily flow close in to the side of the hill and the collector can work in the bed of the stream. Many species of Scoparia are to be disturbed from the river bank and S. philetaera was found only at this spot.

[Footnote] * I found many of this plant in blossom early in December and there were still a few in flower late in February.

– 422 –

A number of little streams flow down the mountain side, their course being marked by shallow scrub-filled gullies. To ascend the mountain one of these can be followed up till it is lost on the open grassland above. Following along the spur the climb is an easy one and a height of between 4,000 and 5,000 feet can be attained with little effort. At this elevation there are many patches of loose shingle, forming easily worked localities for Erebia merula and moths of the genera Notoreas, Dasyuris, etc. Lepidoptera, however, are comparatively rare along the top of the ridge and better success will be experienced by working down on the Tasman side of the mountain. Here there is much more vegetation though interrupted by numerous shingle slips. Towards the base of the hill tussocky areas are intersperesed and the shrubby patches are often mixed with a strong growth of the fern, Polystichum vestitum. In such situations Xanthorhoe helias was plentiful.

Tasman Valley and the Vicinity of the Ball Glacier Hut.—The Ball Hut forms a convenient headquarters for working the upper end of Mount Franklin and the head of the Tasman Valley. A motor service from the “Hermitage” takes guests to within about an hour's walk of the Hut. (Before this is in print a motor-road will probably have been formed almost to the door). The building is a substantial three-roomed cottage and provides conveniences and comforts hardly to be expected at such an outpost.

After crossing the Hooker Bridge the road winds, for about half the distance, along the base of Mount Franklin, the country being largely tussock-covered ridges with intervening shrubby gullies. The valley here is very wide and flat, and, for the most part, is bare shingle. At about halfway the road leaves Mount Franklin and crosses to the moraine, on the side of which it keeps till the terminus is reached. On this upper part of the track the sides of the mountain are steeper and the vegetation, in many places, too thick and strong to admit of collecting to any advantage. Down by the track, however, there are many quite suitable spots and there is a particularly attractive looking area of scrubby bush not far from where the track leaves the mountain side. At the Hut an easily climbed spur from Mount Franklin leads to a satisfactory collecting ground, there being a considerable area which is not too steep and which is well clothed with shrubby and herbaceous plants.

The River Flats.—Where these are uniformly clothed with tussock there is not much variety of insect life, but near the streams, where more or less bare shingle occurs, several interesting species, such as Scoparia asaleuta, S. cataxesta, Lythria catapyrrha and Zizina oxleyi, may be found. One of the best of such localities runs parallel to the Hooker River before the stream passes under the traffic bridge.

Sebastopol Spur and the Red Lake.—Sebastopol Spur may be reached by crossing the Black Birch Stream either at the end of Governor's Bush track or where the stream debouches on the main valley. In either case the ascent of the spur is an easy one. Many shingle slips provide localities for species which prefer such condi-

– 423 –

tions and the intervening grassy slopes produce several Crambi and Scopariae.

The mountain tarn known as the Red Lake lies in a little hollow at about 4,000 feet. Its moist shores support a different lepidopterous fauna from that of the hillside. The endemic Phycitid, Delogenes limadoxa, is very abundant here and such damp-loving species as Diptychophora helioctypa, Proteroeca comastis and others occur freely. Some hundred feet above the lake the crest of the spur is passed and a level thickly grassed area dotted with a number of small tarns is reached. Here, however, in striking contrast to the abundant life round the lake, lepidoptera are extremely scarce.

List of the Lepidoptera.
Arctiidae.

Metacrias sp.

What appears to have been a species of Metacrias was seen on Mount Franklin, near the Ball Glacier Hut, in December. Several were observed but none was captured.

Hypsidae.

Nyctemera annulata (Boisd.), Voy. Astr., 5, 197, pl. 5, 9.

Only a few examples of this usually common species were seen; the ragwort (Senecio Jacobaea), its favourite food plant, has not yet gained a footing in the district.

Noctuidae.

Agrotis ypsilon (Rott.) Naturf., 9, 141.

Several.

Ichneutica marmorata (Huds.) Ent. Mo. Mag., 60, 7.

One in January.

Leucania acontistis Meyr. Trans. N.Z. Inst., 19, 9.

A few in January.

L. toroneura Meyr. Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond., (1901), 565.

One at the Ball Hut, in December.

L. semivittata Walk., Cat., 32, 628.

Several.

Aletia moderata (Walk.) Cat., 32, 705.

Common in January and February.

A. griseipennis (Feld). Reis Nov., pl. 109, 22.

Very common in February.

A. cuneata Philip., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 48, 420.

One in February.

A. nullifera (Walk.) Cat., 11, 742.

A few in January and February.

– 424 –

A. cucullina (Guen.), Ent. Mo. Mag., 5, 40.

One in December at the Ball Hut.

A. empyrea Huds., Ent. Mo. Mag., 4 (3rd ser.), 61.

One in January on the Sebastopol track (Lindsay).

Physetica coerulea (Guen.), Ent. Mo. Mag., 5, 38.

A few in January and February.

Persectania ewingii (Westw.), Proc. Ent. Soc. 2, 55.

Common in February.

P. propria (Walk.), Cat., 9, 111.

Common in February.

P. atristriga (Walk.), Cat., 33, 756.

Fairly common in February.

Melanchra maya Huds., N.Z. Moths, 17, pl. 4, 31.

Several taken in January and February at flowers of Dracophyllum.

M. mutans (Walk.), Cat., 11, 602.

Common.

M. furtiva Philip., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 55, 663.

Fairly common in January and February.

M. asterope Huds., N.Z. Moths, 24, pl. 5, 15.

Several examples in January.

M. rubescens (Butl.), Cist. Ent., 2, 489.

Fairly common in January and February.

M. ochthistis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 19, 20.

One in January.

M. sequens (Howes), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 44, 204.

Very common in January.

M. paracausta (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 19, 15.

A few in December and January.

M. dotata (Walk.), Cat., 11, 522.

Very common in February.

M. lithias (Meyr.), Trans. NZ.Inst., 19, 17.

A few in January and one in February.

M. morosa (Butl.), Cist. Ent., 2, 543.

Common in February.

M. ustistriga (Walk.), Cat., 11, 630.

A few in February.

M. agorastis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 19, 18.

Very common in February.

M. oliveri (Hamps.), Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (8), 8, 424.

One in January and two in February at flowers of Dracophyllum longifolium.

M. phricias (Meyr,). Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 46.

One in February.

M. olivea Watt, Trans. N.Z. Inst., 48, 413.

One in February.

Bityla defigurata (Walk.), Cat., 33, 756.

One in February.

– 425 –

Ariathisa comma (Walk.), Cat., 9, 239.

Common in January and February.

Rhapsa scotosialis Walk., Cat., 34, 1150.

Several in December.

Geometridae.

Tatosoma tipulata (Walk.), Cat., 25, 1417.

Several in January and one in December.

T. alta Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 45, 76.

Common in January.

T. topea Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 35, 246.

Several in January.

Chloroclystis melochlora Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 58.

A few specimens, ranging from December to February.

C. punicea Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 54, 148.

A few in January and becoming abundant in February.

C. acompsa Prout, Trans. N.Z. Inst., 58, 76.

One in January.

C. lichenodes (Purd.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 19, 70.

Common in January and February.

C. sandycias Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1905), 219.

Several in January.

C. neries (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 51.

Fairly common in January.

C. muscosata (Walk.), Cat., 25, 1246.

One in December.

C. bilineolata (Walk.), Cat., 25, 1246.

A few in December.

C. fumipalpata (Feld.) Reis. Nov., pl. 131, 33.

A few in January.

Eucymatoge gobiata (Feld.), Reis. Nov., pl. 131, 2.

Common, December to February.

Hydriomena hemizona Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1897), 385.

Common in January.

H. rixata (Feld.), Reis. Nov., pl. 132, 1.

Several in February.

H. callichlora (Butl.), Cist. Ent., 2, 509.

One at Governor's Bush in January (Lindsay).

Venusia charidema Meyr., Sub-antarctic Islds., 1, 70.

A few in January and February.

V. undosata (Feld.), Reis. Nov., pl. 128, 2.

Fairly common in December and February.

V. xanthaspis (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 61.

A few in February.

Poecilasthena pulchraria (Dbld.), Dieff, N.Z., 2, 286.

Fairly common in January.

– 426 –

Asaphodes abrogata (Walk.), Cat., 24, 1075.

Common in February.

A. parora (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 63.

Several in January and February.

A. megaspilata (Walk.), Cat., 24, 1198.

Several in January and February.

Xanthorhoe clarata (Walk.), Cat., 24, 1197.

Very common in January and February.

X. plumbea Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 47, 194.

Common in January. None of its near allies X. eupitheciaria, X. cinerearia and X. semisignata, was observed during this month.

X. eupitheciaria (Guen.), Ent. Mo. Mag., 5, 95.

Common in February; C. plumbea was not observed.

X. semisignata (Walk.), Cat., 24, 1200.

Common in February.

X. helias. Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 81.

Common in February at the base of Mount Franklin near the Hooker traffic bridge.

X. cataphracta (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 79.

A few in February.

X. orophyla (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 71.

Common in February.

X. semifissata (Walk.), Cat., 25, 1320.

Fairly common in February.

X. chlamydota (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 72.

Two at Governor's Bush in January and one in the Hooker Valley in February.

X. cedrinodes Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 72.

A single worn example in January.

X. stricta Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 47, 195.

One in February.

X. cymozeucta Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 42, 25.

One at Governor's Bush in January (Lindsay).

Notoreas zopyra (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 89.

Common in January and February in the bed of the Black Birch Stream.

N. brephos (Walk.), Cat., 24, 1037.

Not uncommon; December to February.

N. anthracias (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 84.

A few near the Ball Hut in February.

N. paradelpha (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 86.

One near the Ball Hut in February.

Dasyuris anceps (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 392, pl. 43, 3.

Fairly common near the Ball Hut in February.

D. austrina Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 58, 359.

There is an example of this species, labelled “Mt. Cook, T. Hall,” in the Auckland Museum collections.

– 427 –

D. transaurea Howes, Trans. N.Z. Inst., 44, 203.

One near the Ball Hut in February.

D. leucobathra Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 59.

A few worn specimens in February.

Lythria catapyrrha (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 392, pl. 43, 2.

Not uncommon on shingly localities in December and January.

L. regilla Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 58, 360.

A few in December, January and February.

Dichromodes gypsotis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 60.

One in January on Mt. Franklin opposite the “Hermitage” (Lindsay).

Epirranthis alectoraria (Walk.), Cat., 20, 259.

A single worn specimen in January.

E. hemipteraria (Guen.), Lep., 9, 220, pl. 6, 2.

A few in January and February.

Selidosema monacha Huds., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 35, 245, pl. 30, 4.

Fairly common in December, January and February.

S. leucelaea Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 41, 6.

Several in January and February. The males of this species are frequently only to be differentiated with great difficulty from those of the former species.

S. indistincta (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 394, pl. 43, 8.

Abundant in February. The Mt. Cook race has the white band preceding the subterminal line almost always present.

S. productata (Walk.), Cat., 24, 1197.

Common, December to February.

S. dejectaria (Walk.), Cat., 21, 394.

Several in February.

S. suavis (Butl.), Cist. Ent., 2, 497.

Abundant in December.

Sestra humeraria (Walk.), Cat., 23, 940.

One in December.

S. flexata (Walk.), Cat., 25, 1421.

Common in December.

Azelina fortinata (Guen.), Ent. Mo. Mag., 5, 41.

Common, December to February.

Declana niveata Butl., Cist. Ent., 2, 500.

Fairly common in February.

D. floccosa Walk., Cat., 15, 1649.

A few in February.

D. junctilinea Walk., Cat., 32, 643.

Common in February.

D. egregia (Feld.), Reis. Nov., pl. 131, 24.

One in January at flowers of Dracophyllum longifolium.

D. glacialis Huds., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 35, 245.

Several in January.

– 428 –

Nymphalidae.

Argyrophenga antipodum Dbld., Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist., 16 (1845), 307.

Common, December to February. The race does not differ from the southern lowland form.

Erebia merula Hew., Ent. Mo. Mag., 12, 10 (1875).

Fairly common in December and January; not observed in February.

E. butleri (Fered.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 12, 264.

None seen, but Dr. Tillyard took the species commonly in March.

Pyrameis gonerilla (Fabr.), Syst. Ent., 498, 237.

Common in February.

Lycaenidae.

Chrysophanus sallustius Fabr., Syst., Ent., 11, 310.

Common in January and February.

C. boldenarum (White), Proc. Ent. Soc. (3), 1, 26.

Abundant, December and February.

Zizina oxleyi (Feld.), Reis, Nov., pl. 2, 280.

Common in February along the Hooker river-bed near the traffic bridge. Oxleyi is usually regarded as being a smaller species than labradus, but the Mt. Cook race is quite as large as that species.

Phycitidae.

Delogenes limodoxa Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 50, 132.

Common in January and February, usually in more or less dampsituations.

Crambidae.

Orocrambus caesius Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 56, 390.

Several in January and February.

O. melampetrus Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 133.

One in December in the Hooker Valley.

Crambus corruptus (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 399, pl. 43, 9.

Two examples in December near the Ball Hut.

C. antimorus Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1901), 567.

Common in December and January.

C. heteranthes Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1901), 568.

Common in December and January.

C. apselias Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 39, 108.

Common in February. A few in December at Ball Hut.

C. dicrenellus Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 15, 22.

Common in February.

C. vitellus Dbld., Dieff. N.Z., 2, 289.

Fairly common in January and February. A rather large race, more whitish than usual.

– 429 –

C. callirrhous Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 15, 24.

Several in February.

C. simplex (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 400, pl. 43, 12.

Common in February.

C. vulgaris Butl., Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 400, pl. 43, 7.

Common in February.

C. flexuosellus Dbld., Dieff. N.Z., 2, 289.

Common in February.

C. obstructus Meyr., Ent. Mo. Mag. (1911), 82.

Common in February.

Tauroscopa gorgopis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 69.

What appears to be a small female of this species was taken at the Ball Hut in December and a few were secured by Mr. Lindsay near Kea Point in January.

Diptychophora helioctypa Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 15, 17.

Common in January and February near the Red Lake.

D. elaina Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 15, 17.

A few in January.

D. interrupta (Feld.), Reis. Nov. pl. 135, 15.

Common in January and February.

D. pyrsophanes Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 15, 11.

Common in January and February.

D. epiphaea Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 132.

Common in January.

Gadira acerella Walk., Cat., 35, 1742.

Several in January and one in February.

Pyraustidae.

Musotima nitidalis (Walk.), Cat., 34, 1317.

Common in December and January.

Mecyna maorialis (Feld.), Reis. Nov., pl. 134, 34.

Several in December and January.

M. flavidalis (Dbld.), Dieff, N.Z., 2, 287.

Common in February.

M. notata (Butl.), Cist. Ent., 2, 493.

Several in February.

Proteroeca comastis Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1884), 335.

Common in January and February at the Red Lake.

Heliothela atra (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 404.

Common in January.

Scoparia cyptastis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 41, 7.

Common, December to February. The large dark race, found also at Arthur's Pass.

S. melanaegis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 92.

Several in January.

S. chalara Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1901), 570.

Common, December and January.

– 430 –

S. octophora Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 118.

Common in February.

S. tetracycla Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 19, 97.

Not uncommon, December to February.

S. parmifera Meyr., Sub-antaractic Islds., 72.

Common in January. A rather small race.

S. organaea Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1901), 569.

Several, December to February.

S. thyridias Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1905), 229.

A few in January.

S. philerga Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 81.

Several in January and February.

S. cymatias Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 86.

One in January.

S. galactalis Huds., Ent. Mo. Mag. (1913), 250.

Common in January and February.

S. steropaea Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 103.

Common in January and February.

S. asaleuta Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 39, 111.

Common in January on shingle near the Hooker River-bed.

S. cataxesta Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 96.

Common in December and January in the same situation as the preceding species.

S. paltomacha Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 105.

Several in December and January.

S. crypsinoa Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 102.

Common in December and January.

S. psammittis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 99.

Common in January.

S. feredayi Knaggs., Ent. Mo. Mag., 4, 80.

Common, December to February.

S. philetaera Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 93.

Common in February round the base of Mt. Franklin near the Hooker River traffic bridge.

S. asterisca (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 118.

Common in February.

S. trivirgata (Feld.), Reis. Nov., pl. 137, 29.

Common, December to February.

S. deltophora (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 106.

One in February.

S. niphospora (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 115.

Several in February.

S. characta Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 90.

Common in February.

S. minusculalis Walk., Cat., 34, 1503.

One in February.

– 431 –

S. dinodes Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 85.

One in February.

S. axena Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 103.

A few in February at the Ball Hut.

S. cyameuta (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 112.

Common in February.

S. exilis Knaggs, Ent. Mo. Mag., 4, 81.

I did not meet with this species, but Hudson records it (B. and M. of N.Z., 197).

S. halopis Meyr., Sub-antarctic Islds., 72.

Several in February.

S. sabulosella (Walk.), Cat., 27, 17, 8.

Common, December to February.

S. ergatis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 88.

Common in December.

S. microphthalma Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 87.

One in the Hooker Valley in January (Lindsay).

S. nomeutis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 116.

One in the Hooker Valley in January (Lindsay).

Pterophoridae.

Platyptilia falcatalis Walk., Cat., 30, 931.

Several in February.

P. deprivatalis Walk., Cat., 30, 946.

Several in February.

Alucita monospilalis (Walk.), Cat., 30, 950.

Common in February.

Stenoptilia charadrias (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 126.

Fairly common in February.

Tortricidae.

Catamacta rureana Feld., Reis Nov., pl. 137, 47.

One in February.

Eurythecta eremana (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 144.

Several in February.

Ascerodes prochlora Meyr., Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1905), 234.

One in February near the Ball Hut.

Tortrix conditana Walk., Cat., 28, 306.

One in February.

T. excessana (Walk.), Cat., 28, 303.

Common in January and February. A large reddish race.

T. alopecana Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 17, 147.

Several bred from larvae found feeding on Phyllocladus alpinus. The moths emerged early in February (Lindsay).

T. flavescens (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 402.

Several in December.

– 432 –

T. molybditis Meyr. Trans. N.Z. Inst., 39, 116.

Several in January.

Ctenopseustis obliquana (Walk.), Cat., 28, 302.

Fairly common in February.

Epichorista persecta Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 46, 104.

A few in January and February.

E. aspistana (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 15, 42.

A few in January and February.

E. emphanes (Meyr.), Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1901), 571.

Several taken in January (Lindsay).

Harmologa oblongana (Walk.), Cat., 28, 303.

A few in February.

Gelophaula trisulca (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 48, 44.

One in January on Mt. Franklin opposite the “Hermitage” (Lindsay).

Gelechiidae.

Thiotricha tetraphala Meyr. Trans. N.Z. Inst., 18, 164.

Several in February.

Phthorimaea thyraula (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 18, 167.

One in February.

P. cheradias (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 41, 12.

Several in January near the Red Lake.

P. glaucoterma (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 63.

One in January.

Gelechia monophragma Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 18, 169.

Common in December and January.

Anisoplaca fraxinea Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 58, 364.

Common in February.

A. ptyoptera Meyr. Trans. N.Z. Inst., 18, 171.

One in February.

Oecophoridae.

Borkhausenia armigerella (Walk.), Cat., 29, 698.

Common, December to February.

B. siderodeta (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 43.

A few in January.

B. xanthomicta (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 48, 415.

One in January.

B. grata Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 58, 85.

One in January.

B. innotella (Walk.), Cat., 29, 652.

A few in February.

B. terrena Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 56, 391.

A few in February.

– 433 –

B. siderota (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 82.

One in December.

B. eriphaea Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 46, 107.

Several in December.

B. thalerodes Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 48, 416.

A few in December.

B. crotala Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 47, 213.

Not uncommon in January.

B. nycteris (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 22, 219.

Common in January.

Thamnosara sublitella (Walk.), Cat., 29, 654.

Not uncommon in January.

Gymnobathra parca (Butl.), Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. (1877), 405.

Common in January.

G. coarctatella (Walk.), Cat., 29, 768.

A few in December.

Trachypepla ingenua Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 65.

One in February.

T. anastrella Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 16, 19.

One in February.

Izatha convulsella (Walk.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 47, 200.

One in January.

Euchersadaula lathriopa (Meyr.), Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. (1905), 237.

Several in December. Rather greyer than usual.

Philobota amenena Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 78.

Two in January.

Cryptolechia apocrypta (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 18, 172.

Common in December to February.

Eutorna caryochroa Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 21, 158.

Common in January and February.

Carposinidae.

Carposina gonosemana (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 15, 67.

One in February.

C. maculosa Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 57, 705.

One in January on the Sebastopol track (Lindsay).

Glyphipterygidae.

Heliostibes electrica Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 21, 157.

One in February.

Simaethis microlitha Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 84.

A single female taken in February appears to be this species.

S. symbolaea Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 85.

One in December.

– 434 –

S. tillyardi Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 55, 666.

March. The specimen captured by Dr. Tillyard remains unique.

Glyphipteryx erastis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 76.

Several in January.

G. codonias Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 41, 15.

A few in January.

G. achlyoessa (Meyr.), Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S.W., (1880), 252.

Several in December.

G. zelota Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 86.

A few in January and February.

G. dichorda Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 76.

One in January on Mt. Franklin opposite the “Hermitage.”

G. leptosema Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 20, 87.

Several in February.

Elachistidae.

Elachista helonoma Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 21, 178.

Common in February.

E. ombrodoca Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 21, 179.

Common in December.

Hyponomeutidae.

Zelleria copidota (Meyr.), Trans. N.Z. Inst., 21, 163.

Common in January.

Gracilariidae.

Gracilaria elaeas Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 43, 66.

Common in January.

G. selenitis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 41, 15.

Several in December.

Plutellidae.

Dolichernis chloroleuca Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 23, 99.

Common in February.

Orthenches porphyritis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 18, 176.

Common, December to February.

O. semifasciata Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 47, 200.

A single male in February. The specimen is larger (19 mm.) than usual.

Plutella maculipennis Curt., Brit. Ent., pl. 420.

Several in February.

Tineidae.

Mallabathra subalpina Philp., Rec. Cant., Mus.

Several near the Red Lake in January.

M. fragilis Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 57, 708.

One in December.

– 435 –

Nepticulidae.

Nepticula progonopis Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 53, 336.

Several in December.

N. lucida Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 51, 225.

Common in December.

Hepialidae.

Porina umbraculata (Guen.), Ent. Mo. Mag., 5, 1.

Common in January.

P. fusca Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 46, 121.

Several in January.

P. aurimaculata Philp., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 46, 121.

The type specimen was obtained from the “Hermitage” in 1913 by Mr. F. S. Oliver. A second example, now in the collection Cawthron Institute, was forwarded to the writer by the manager of the Mount Cook Motor Company in 1928.

Mnesarchaeidae.

Mnesarchaea paracosma Meyr., Trans. N.Z. Inst., 18, 180.

Fairly common in January.

Micropterygidae.

Sabatinca sp.

A single specimen, not in determinable condition, but probably S. chrysargyra Meyr., was taken in January.

Note.—There are two species taken by Fereday and described by Meyrick (Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond., 1901) which are not included in the above list. These are Scoparia torodes Meyr. and S. alopecias Meyr. The former, I am inclined to think, is the same insect as S. galactalis Huds. Regarding the latter, Mr. Lindsay informs me that a species under that name in the Fereday collection looks like a faintly marked S. ergatis Meyr. This example may not, however, be authentic; ergatis occurs commonly at Mount Cook and was well known to Mr. Meyrick who had both sexes of his alopecias before him for description.

Description of New Species. Selidosemidae.

Selidosema adusta n. sp.

♂ ♀. 29-39 mm. Head, palpi and thorax ochreous mixed with brown. Antennae grey mixed with brown, in ♂ moderately bipectinated. Abdomen pale ochreous sprinkled with fuscous. Legs pale ochreous, anterior pair fuscous, tarsi annulated with ochreous. Forewings elongate-triangular, costa strongly arched, apex subrectangular (in ♀ more acute), termen bowed, oblique; greyish-brown (in one example somewhat ochreous); lines blackish-fuscous, often very obscure; 1st line double, excurved above middle; median line irregular, indented below middle; 2nd line rather sinuate; subterminal

– 436 –

dentate, slightly excurved above middle and incurved below, obscurely pale-margined posteriorly; a series of triangular black dots round termen: fringes grey with obscure brown basal line. Hindwings suboblong, termen slightly projecting on vein 4, dorsum broadly rounded; greyish-white, finely sprinkled with fuscous posteriorly: fringes whitish-grey.

Closely allied to S. fenerata Feld. and S. argentaria Philp. From the former it is at once distinguished by the rounded (not angled) dorsum of the hindwings; from the latter it may be separated by the less prominent projection on the termen of hindwings at vein 4, by the broader forewings and the browner ground colour.

Governor's Bush. Common in December. Holotype (♂) allotype (♀) and paratypes in collection Canterbury Museum; paratypes in collection Dominion Museum and Cawthron Institute.

Pyraustidae.

Scoparia sinuata n. sp.

♂ ♀. 18-19 mm. Head and palpi brown mixed with white. Antennae bright brown, minutely ciliated in ♂. Thorax brown, Abdomen greyish-ochreous. Legs whitish-ochreous, anterior pair fuscous, tarsi obscurely annulated with ochreous. Forewings short, costa almost straight, apex almost rectangular, termen nearly straight, little oblique; pale brown mixed with blackish along costa basally; 1st line white, slightly outwards-curved, indented at middle, posteriorly margined with black; 2nd line white, parallel to termen, slightly sinuate beneath costa, incurved above dorsum; an obscure subterminal whitish shade, remote from 2nd line; orbicular and claviform hardly indicated; reniform obscurely X-shaped, black, lower fork filled with whitish: fringes brown with darker basal line. Hindwings very pale ochreous clouded with brown: fringes ochreous-white with a dark basal line round apex.

The shape of the 2nd line is somewhat similar to that of S. chalara Meyr., but sinuata is much smaller and less ochreous in colour.

Three males and a female in February. Holotype (♂) and a female in collection Canterbury Museum and a male in the collections Dominion Museum and Cawthron Institute. As the female is in poor condition, I have refrained from making it the allotype.

Scoparia limatula n. sp.

♂ ♀. 26 mm. Head, palpi and thorax grey. Antennae brown, minutely ciliated. Abdomen ochreous. Legs white, anterior pair infuscated, posterior pair somewhat ochreous. Forewings elongate-triangular, costa straight, arched towards apex, apex rectangular, termen slightly sinuate, little oblique; white, densely strewn with grey and fuscous scales, the latter tending to form numerous linear dots, particularly on the apical third of wing: stigmata and lines almost obsolete; 2nd line white, faintly indicated, its course marked by a series of fuscous dots, strongly excurved beneath costa, thence incurved to before dorsum; a series of fuscous spots round termen:

– 437 –

fringes greyish-white with two darker grey lines. Hindwings and fringes brassy-ochreous.

Not very close to any other Scoparia but perhaps related to the petrina group.

The type material consists of a male from Bold Peak (Wakatipu) taken in 1913 by Mr. G. Howes, another male secured by myself at Invercargill in January, 1916, and a female taken at Mount Cook in February. Holotype (♂) and a male paratype in collection Cawthron Institute; Holotype (♀) in collection Canterbury Museum.

Oecophoridae.

Leptocroca obliqua n. sp.

♂. Head ochreous. Palpi ochreous mixed with fuscous. Antennae fuscous, obscurely mixed with ochreous, ciliations in ♂ 1. Thorax greyish-brown. Abdomen grey, brassy tinged dorsally, segmental divisions paler. Legs ochreous, anterior pair infuscated. Forewings elongate, costa rather strongly arched, apex round-pointed, termen strongly oblique; whitish-grey; markings greyish-brown; a stripe on base of costa to two-fifths, attenuated apically and enclosing a dark blotch before apex; an oblique nearly straight fascia from half to tornus, the area between this and termen being more mixed with pinkish brown; stigmata blackish; 1st discal above plical; 2nd discal enclosed in median fascia; an interrupted series of blackish scales round apex and termen: fringes ochreous-grey, tinged with pink round apex. Hindwings shining grey: fringes whitish-grey.

Nearest to L. variabilis Philp; the oblique median fascia and the darker apical portion of forewing are good distinguishing characters. The male genitalia, which can usually be sufficiently examined without dissection, display quite satisfactory differentiating features.

Two males in January. Holotype in collection Canterbury Museum; paratype in collection Dominion Museum.

Carposinidae.

Carposina canescens n. sp.

♂ ♀. 15-17 mm. Head, palpi and thorax whitish-grey. Antennae grey, ciliations in ♂ 4. Abdomen whitish-ochreous. Legs, anterior and middle pair fuscous, tarsi annulated with ochreous, posterior pair ochreous-white. Forewings, costa moderately arched, apex rounded, termen straight, oblique; grey, faintly greenish tinged; a black basal area on costa reaching half across wing and indicated below middle by a few raised black scales; 5 or 6 black spots on costa between ⅓ and apex; an oblique black bar of raised scales beneath 1st costal spot, outwardly margined with ochreous and white; 3 or 4 ring-like spots and some scattered blackish and ochreous scales in disc; an obscure interrupted blackish subterminal fascia; termen thickly sprinkled with blackish scales: fringes fuscous-grey sprinkled with white. Hindwings shining grey, in ♂ with ochreous area along costa from base to ½ fringes ochreous-white.

– 438 –

Approaching C. epomiana Meyr., but a smaller and narrower-winged species.

Four males and one female in Governor's Bush in February. Holotype (♂) and Holotype (♀) in collection Canterbury Museum; two male paratypes in collection Cawthron Institute and one male paratype in collection Dominion Museum.

C. ignobilis n. sp.

♂. 16 mm. Head, palpi and thorax grey mixed with brown. Antennae ochreous-grey spotted with fuscous, ciliations in ♂ 3. Abdomen ochreous. Legs ochreous, anterior pair infuscated. Forewings narrow, hardly dilated posteriorly, costa rather strongly arched, apex round-pointed, termen very oblique; ochreous-grey densely irrorated with fuscous; basal patch indicated by blackish scales, more prominently below fold; an oblique blackish scale-tuft crossing fold at about ¼, suffusedly margined inwardly with a fuscous shade which extends right across wing; some very obscure dark spots on apical ⅔ of costa; an obscure blackish spot in disc at ¾: fringes densely speckled with fuscous and whitish. Hindwings shining grey: fringes whitish-ochreous.

An obscure species, perhaps related to the preceding form, but lacking the ochreous patch on costa of hindwing and having quite different genitalic characters.

A single male taken in Governor's Bush in February. Holotype in collection Canterbury Museum.

Glyphipterygidae.

Hierodoris eremita n. sp.

♀. 22-24 mm. Head whitish-ochreous. Palpi, ochreous-whitish mixed outwardly with brown. Antennae whitish, closely annulated with fuscous. Thorax leaden white. Abdomen whitish-ochreous. broadly banded with dark fuscous dorsally. Legs ochreous white. Forewings oblong, costa strongly arched, apex broadly rounded, termen rounded, not oblique; shining white, faintly ochreous tinged towards termen: fringes white. Hindwings ochreous white, iridescent; apical half fuscous: fringes white.

Not at all like any other species of the genus. The resemblance to a female Gelophaula is most marked.

Five females in December, three in the Hooker Valley and two near the Ball Glacier Hut. Holotype (♂) and a paratype in collection Canterbury Museum; two paratypes in collection Cawthron Institute and one paratype in collection Dominion Museum.

Elachistidae.

Elachista napaea n. sp.

♂. 9-10 mm. Head and thorax grey. Palpi greyish-white. Antennae fuscous. Abdomen dark grey, anal tuft ochreous. Legs ochreous, tarsi annulated with blackish fuscous. Forewings hardly dilated posteriorly, apex blunt; whitish-grey with some ochreous and numerous blackish scales; a series of blackish dots along fold from

– 439 –

near base to about ⅓, sometimes absent; an ochreous blotch on fold at about ½, containing a linear black mark, sometimes very obscure, but seldom absent; sometimes the black scales tend to form a linear mark in disc at ¾: fringes grey speckled with black except on tornal ½ where they are greyish fuscous. Hindwings and fringes fuscous-grey.

Resembles E. ombrodoca Meyr., but a larger insect. The male genitalia offer good distinguishing characters.

Common in Governor's Bush in December. No females were taken. Holotype (♂) and paratypes in collection Canterbury Museum; and paratypes in collections Dominion Museum and Cawthron Institute.

Acknowledgements.

I have gratefully to acknowledge the assistance received from the New Zealand Institute in the shape of a Research Grant which covered the expenses of the last two visits to the locality. To Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lindsay my thanks are due for hospitality extended during the very successful trip in January, 1929, and I am also much indebted to Mr. Lindsay for information regarding the Mount Cook material in the Fereday collection. Mr. Lindsay further placed me in his debt by going through my list and adding several species which I had failed to observe. For the loan of literature, apparatus and specimens I wish to express my best thanks to the Cawthron Institute, and to Mr. E. S. Gourlay, of that institution, who spared no pains to assist me in many ways. I am also indebted to Miss A. Castle, of the Dominion Museum, for help of a similar nature. Finally, I have to thank the Director and Board of the Auckland Institute and Museum for facilities cordially extended towards the preparation of this paper.