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Volume 63, 1934
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New Zealand Astronomical Society.
Report of the Section for the Observation of Meteors for the Years 1929–1931.

[Received by Editor, 5th August, 1932; issued separately January, 1934]

The first report of the Meteor Section of the New Zealand Astronomical Society, covering the years 1927–28, was published in 1929 (Trans. N.Z. Inst., 60, p. 448, reprinted as Bulletin 5 of the N.Z. Astronomical Society). The present report, covering the work done in the past three years, is on similar lines to the preceding one.

It is a matter for satisfaction that this report has more than maintained the standard set in its predecessor. This advance is noticeable not only in membership, but also in the quantity and quality of the work performed.

A very satisfactory standard of accuracy has been maintained in the observations made. All of these have been examined and reduced by the Director, thereby ensuring uniformity in results. At the same time, it has been a special aim to train observers to perform their own reductions, with the twofold purpose of making their interest in the subject more permanent and of relieving the Director of a quantity of routine work which threatens to become unmanageable, in order that more time may be devoted to special studies which have been somewhat neglected in the past.

The observation and study of meteors in the northern hemisphere provides an opportunity for original research which is regarded as valuable. Such research is of even greater utility in this hemisphere, where we are working in a practically virgin field. It is only in recent years that the southern skies have been systematically studied by meteor observers, and the first fruits of this work are only now becoming apparent.

Despite the labours of the various observers the amount of our knowledge of the radiants, rates, and other points in connection with southern meteor showers remains surprisingly small, and the need for keen and energetic observers is as great as when the Meteor Section was initiated.

The study of meteors is an astronomical research which is eminently suited to the amateur. Nothing more than star maps and enthusiasm are required. Proficiency in observing is obtained almost at the outset, and after a little practice an observer is able to understand and interpret his observations unaided, and thereby to gain a lasting interest in his study. The possibility of original discoveries is enormous. Not only are there countless problems in meteoric astronomy requiring elucidation, but with his intimate knowledge of the starry sky there is always the chance that a meteor worker will be the first to recognise a new star or bright comet.

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Personnel.

Messrs Bateson and Thomsen, original members of the section, through pressure of other astronomical work, have been unable to maintain their output of meteor observations, but the acquisition of two new and active members in Messrs Geddes (February, 1931) and Butterton (October, 1931), together with valued observations and assistance from other members of the New Zealand Astronomical Society, has kept the section in a state of vigorous activity.

The following persons have contributed to the present report:—

  • F. M. Bateson, Wellington (B.).

  • M. S. Butterton, Wellington (Bu.).

  • M. Geddes, Otekura and New Plymouth (G.).

  • R. A. McIntosh, Auckland (M.).

  • F. J. Morshead, New Plymouth (Mo.).

  • I. L. Thomsen, Wellington (T.).

Occasional assistance has also been rendered by Mrs F. M. Bateson (counts of meteor rates) and C. G. Crust (reports of meteors seen).

The observations made by the members of the section are summarised in the following table:—

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Obs. 1929. 1930. 1931. Total. Telesc. Meteors.
h. m. Mets. h. m. Mets. h. m. Mets. h. m. Mets.
B. 10 39 106 3 40 50 14 19 156
Bu. 3 30 15 3 30 15
G. 130 38 1500 130 38 1500
M. 99 48 1500 27 49 680 17 23 236 145 0 2316
Mo. 1 12 8 1 12 8 12
T. 1 5 7 1 5 7 1
Total 110 27 1606 28 54 687 156 23 1809 295 44 4013 13

From the above table it will be seen that an average of 13 meteors an hour has been observed under all kinds of observing conditions.

Special Meteoric Showers.

The New Zealand meteor observers are greatly handicapped by not having prior knowledge of any but the most prominent meteoric displays of the year. Each night's observations bring to light entirely new radiants, and in most instances not even an approximate idea of the rate of meteoric activity to be expected is known before-hand.

Several years ago the Director compiled a catalogue from various lists of radiants, expecting that with the aid of this the radiants visible on any night could be determined before commencing observing, but the catalogue has failed in its object. In practice it has been found that only one or two out of perhaps a dozen radiants expected on any given night were actually active. Owing to the catalogue being arranged in order of date, it is also unsuitable for reference purposes.

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A new catalogue, upon quite different lines, is now being prepared by the Director. In this, care is being taken to include only radiants which reasonably satisfy the modern conception of a radiant (see definition of a radiant on page 453). When completed and published it is hoped that observers in this hemisphere will possess a satisfactory calendar of meteoric activity throughout the year to guide them in their future observations.

With such a calendar, observers will then be able to plan their observations so as to fill the gaps in our present knowledge of southern meteor showers, determining dates of commencement and ending, and the maxima of the various displays, instead of scanning the sky for unknown radiants as at present.

Owing to the delay inevitably entailed in preparing and publishing such a calendar, it has been thought desirable to include in this report a summary of the most prominent showers, so far as is revealed by the work of the Meteor Section in the past three years. It is hoped that this list will be of immediate benefit to observers.

The following 36 showers appear most prominent in the data at present available:—

Corona Australids.—Mean centre of radiation, 272°, −40°; observed on March 9, 13, 20, and 26; radiants numbered 228, 232, 238, 243. There is possibly some connection between this shower and Comet 1877i, whose theoretical radiant-point is 273°, −40°, on March 15 (Herschel) or 283.3°, −38.3°, on March 28 (Davidson).

Nu Ophiuchids.—270°, −10°; 8 radiants from April 13 to 29; nos. 262, 264, 275, 280, 284, 291, 306, 314. A feeble shower.

Sagittarids.—303°, −30 ½°; April 13–21; nos. 272, 282, 286, 295, 304. A moderate shower.

Chi Librids.—234°, −20°; April 13–21; nos. 251, 259, 260, 263, 274, 278, 283, 289, 297, 300. A fairly prominent shower. If radiant no. 251 also belongs to this shower its duration is doubled, activity commencing on April 4. The Eta Librids in Denning's General Catalogue (Group 178, nos. 1 and 2) are identical with this series.

Delta Sagittarids.—276 ½°, −33°; April 14–22; nos. 270, 271, 276, 292, 302, 308. A moderate shower, already recorded by Denning (Group 210, 2 and 3). Other showers from this region are visible in May and June.

Aquilids.—289°, +7 ½°; April 16–21; nos. 285, 293, 303. This shower was noted by Denning as the Theta Serpentids (220, 1 and 2). It is probably connected with Comet 1844ii, whose theoretical radiant-point on April 21 is 288 ½°, +5°.

Lyrids.—272 ½°, +33°; April 21–22; nos. 301, 307. Bad weather at the epoch of this well-known northern shower (Denning, 209) has permitted observations on only two nights in the period under review. Given fine weather, satisfactory radiants could be obtained in this country, in spite of the northern declination of the radiant-point.

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Eta Aquarids.—336 ½°, −1 ½° at maximum; April 28 to May 13; nos. 312, 316, 319, 321, 329, 334, 337, 338, 344, 351, 358, 363, 369, 374, 381, 382. This shower is the richest visible annually to the southern observer, and would probably rank higher in the northern hemisphere if it were not so unfavourably placed for observation there (Denning's group 258). Many rich displays have been witnessed in this country, and the radiants deduced show the unmistakable motion of the radiant-point first noted by Dr Olivier and R. M. Dole (Observatory, 44, 242, 1921). The Director's 1929 observations have already formed the subject of a paper (Mon. Not., R.A.S., 90, 157) in which the motion of the radiant-point and the connection of the shower with Halley's comet have been dealt with. The radiants since obtained lend additional weight to the conclusions then reached.

Delta Capricornids.—324 ½°, −17°; April 29-May 7; nos. 315, 323, 326, 332, 342, 349. A moderate shower. The theoretical radiant-point of Comet 837i lies 10° preceding this radiant.

Lambda Sagittarids I.—273°, −29 ½; May 2–11; nos. 317, 320, 324, 331, 335, 339, 346, 364, 372, 377. A prominent southern shower, already noted in Denning's catalogue (210, 3 and 4).

Iota Piscis Australids.—326°, −35°; May 4–8; nos. 328, 333, 336, 341, 368. A new, moderate shower.

Beta Delphinids.—307°, +15 ½°; May 6–11; nos. 340, 348, 356, 359, 366, 380. This shower appears in the General Catalogue under the title Gamma Delphinids (243, 1). The radiants lie close to the theoretical radiant-point of Comet 1853ii, 296 ½°, +13 ½°, on May 1.

Beta Capricornids.—302 ½°, −15°; May 7–11; nos. 355, 365, 379. A fairly rich shower, not yet properly observed. It corresponds with D. 237, no. 2.

Alpha Aquarids.—327 ½°, −2 ½°; May 4–8; nos. 327, 343, 350, 360. A group of radiants lying close to the Eta Aquarids, but distinct.

Alpha Indids.—309°, −49°; May 7–8; nos. 357, 367, 370. Another small and insufficiently-observed shower.

Lambda Sagittarids II.—276 ½°, −25 ½°; June 14–19; nos. 391, 394, 398, 401. The third distinct shower from this region, the three being combined in Group 210 of Denning's catalogue (210, 4 and 5).

Beta Piscis Australids.—334°, −31°; July 2–4; nos. 406, 411, 415. This shower corresponds with Denning's group 262 (no. 2).

Psi 1 Aquarids.—349°, −9°; July 2–8; nos. 407, 412, 416, 419, 421. A shower moderately active.

Capricornid Radiants.—There are two distinct centres of radiation here in July and another in early August, all three being combined in Denning's group 237.

Capricornids I.—307°, −9°; July 5–28; nos. 418, 432, 440, 452.

Capricornids II.—302°, −17°; July 10–16; nos. 423, 435, 438.

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Beta Cetids.—3°, −21°; July 28-August 4; nos. 450, 456, 463, 478, 485, 488, 506. A fairly prominent shower (D. 4, 3) visible at the time of the Delta Aquarids' activity.

Iota Piscids.—351°, +4°; July 31-August 1; nos. 462, 477, 484. A small shower (D. 273, 3).

Delta Aquarids.—341°, −17° at maximum; July 26-August 9; nos. 443, 444, 445, 447, 453, 455, 460, 468, 470, 476, 483, 486, 501, 503, 515, 520, 523, 529, 535, 541. The radiants secured by the New Zealand observers have provided practically all we know of this prominent southern shower (D. 263). The long duration of the shower and the definite shift in its radiant-point, previously disputed but essential to theory, are well shown in the list of radiants secured. A note on this shower has been published by the Director in Observatory, 53, 675, 235. The region, especially at the beginning of August, abounds in radiants, and, being near the zenith, the short, darting meteors are difficult to observe.

Alpha Piscis Australids.—342°, −33° on July 31; July 26-August 9; nos. 442, 448, 454, 459, 467, 475, 482, 500, 502, 514, 534, 539. This well-known shower (D. 262) rivalled the Aquarids in 1929 and 1930, but was surprisingly weak in 1931. The various radiants show some evidence of movement, from R.A. 337° on July 26 to 350° on August 8.

Alpha Capricornids.—304°, −10 ½°; August 3–4; nos. 495, 512, 516. This shower has not often been observed. It is always low in the sky during the writer's observing hours, and has been neglected for the more favourably placed Aquarids and contemporary showers. It corresponds with Denning's group 237, nos. 17, 20, 21, and 22. The stream providing these meteors is undoubtedly connected with Comet 1881v (see orbits published in Observatory, 53, p. 235). Since the parent comet should return in 1933, we may look forward to good displays of meteors from this region in the next few years.

Iota Capricornids.—323°, −15 ½°; August 3–4; nos. 496, 504, 518, 526. Another Capricornid shower, active at the same time as the comet shower. (D. 249, nos. 12, 13, 18, 19.)

Beta Aquarids.—321°, −7°; August 4–8; nos. 505, 517, 522, 533. This shower (D. 249, 14) lies close to the prominent Delta Aquarids.

Zeta Aquarids.—336°, −0 ½°; August 4–9; nos. 513, 527, 538. Although not often observed locally, this seems a prominent shower, judging from the number of references to it in northern catalogues: D. 260, nos. 3, 4, 6, 7; A.M.S. 200, 1160, 1161, 1165, 1495, 1500, 1512.

Sigma Aquarids.—334°, −13°; August 5–13; nos. 519, 546, 550. A small shower helping to add confusion to the Aquarid region, as does the next.

d 1 Aquarids.—351°, −21 ½°; August 7–13; nos. 528, 540, 547, 554. Another small Aquarid radiant, identical with D. 252, 12.

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Alpha Canis Majorids.—97°, −17°; October 16–22; nos. 580, 581, 583. This shower, apparently prominent in mid-October, has not been sufficiently observed. It corresponds with Denning's group 78 (no. 3).

Orionids.—91°, +15° at maximum; October 22; no. 576. Bad weather and moonlight have prevented satisfactory observations of this prominent northern shower (D. 77) in recent years. A series of earlier radiants has been published by the Director (Mon. Not., R.A.S., 90, p. 160).

Leonids.—151°, +21 ½°; November 18; no. 585. The Leonid radiant (D. 115) does not rise much before dawn in this country, and therefore cannot be satisfactorily observed. The shower apparently reached its maximum in 1931 on November 18, confirming the northern hemisphere observations. It is to be hoped that a rich shower will eventuate this year, as New Zealand is in the right longitude, if not the right latitude, to see the best of the display.

Geminids.—101 ½°, +28°; December 3–13; nos. 593, 602. Only two radiants for this prominent shower have been secured (D. 88).

Sigma Puppids.—114°, −45°; December 4–12; nos. 591, 597, 601. This shower seems fairly prominent.

Meteor Rates in Southern Hemisphere.

In the first report it was shown with the scanty data then available that the maximum of meteoric activity in this hemisphere occurred in the winter months, when the meteoric apex was highest in the sky. A full discussion of meteor rates is outside the scope of the present report, but it is hoped to publish shortly a paper dealing fully with this subject. The bare results, deduced from the corrected rates shown in Table II, confirm the earlier belief in the great frequency of meteors in the winter months.

The following table shows the rates (corrected for hindrances to observing) divided into ten-day groups, with additional columns giving the mean rate for each month, together with the number of observations on which each monthly rate is based.

Month Date. Whole Month. No. of Observations.
1–10. 11–20. 21–31.
January 4 14 10 10 9
February 7 7 8 7 18
March 11 8 9 9 22
April 14 13 14 14 30
May 22 12 14 16 38
June 13 12 12 13 22
July 15 15 22 17 33
August 20 14 10 17 33
September 11 9 12 10 11
October 11 12 13 12 17
November 11 11 4
December 14 13 9 12 12

The presence of the Eta Aquarids (May 1–10) and the Delta Aquarids (July 21-August 10) is clearly shown in the above table.

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Further long-continued observations are required for the purpose of determining still more accurately the rate of meteoric activity from day to day.

Cometary Accordances.

Some radiants have been observed which lie close to the theoretical radiant-points of comets which closely approach the earth's orbit, as calculated by A. S. Herschel (Mon. Not., R.A.S., 38, 379) and Dr M. Davidson (Mon. Not., R.A.S., 80, 739).

It is difficult at this stage to determine which of these radiants, if any, are physically connected with the cometary streams. In some cases the comet concerned is an ancient one, perhaps with an orbit not excellently determined. Even in the case of a good orbit, if the comet concerned has not been seen in recent years it may have undergone considerable perturbations in the intervening centuries, so that its apparent radiant-point no longer agrees with that calculated. Even for the rich shower from Halley's comet, the best orbits for the meteor stream are not exactly the same as the orbit of the parent comet (Astr. Nachr., 196, 309, 1913, and Mon. Not., 90, 157).

Another factor tending to depreciate the value of the accordances is that most of the radiants cited are isolated instances, not well-defined showers. This may be due to lack of observations at the critical time, to pronounced tenuity of the stream of meteoroids, or to chance intersections near the theoretical radiant-points of comets being misinterpreted as radiants. With further knowledge of the radiants concerned, which will result from continued observations, we can expect that in a few years these cases of possible identity will be established or ruled out.

In the following table the agreements have been divided into two classes, good and fair. In the former, physical connection seems likely; in the latter the disagreement is too great for satisfaction. Other possible cases, where the agreement is even worse, are noted only in the list of radiants (Table II).

Cometary Accordances.

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I.—Good Agreements.
No. Date. Radiant. Remarks.
° °
Mar. 25 182.5 —28.0 Comet 1264.
9 1926—Mar. 18 175.0 —20.5
239 1931—Mar. 21 176.0 —24.0
240 1931—Mar. 26 180.0 —24.0
Apl. 21 288.5 + 5.0 Comet 1844ii.
285 1929—Apl. 16 288.0 + 7.7
293 1929—Apl. 17 290.0 + 7.0
303 1929—Apl. 21 289.3 + 2.5
Apl. 20 270.5 +32.0 Comet 1861i.
301 1929—Apl. 21 272.2 +32.7 Lyrids.
307 1931—Apl. 22 272.5 +33.0 "
May 4 337.0 0.0 Comet 1910ii.
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° °
329 1930—May 4 336.5 −1.5 Eta Aquarids. See Table II for 15 other radiants.
Aug. 4 303.2 −9.7 Comet 1881v.
495 1929—Aug. 3 303.5—10.5 Alpha Capricornids.
512 1929—Aug. 4 304.0 —10.5 "
516 1931—Aug. 2–4 304.0 —11.0 "
Sept. 10 53.0 —16.0 Comet 1854iv.
87 1928—Sept. 18 60.0 —17.5
Oct. 16 61.0 −7.0 Comet 1580.
578 1931—Oct. 16 59.0 −8.5
Nov. 13 150.5 +23.5 Comet 1866i.
585 1931—Nov. 18 150.7 +21.4

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II.—Fair Agreements.
No. Date. Radiant. Remarks.
° °
Jan. 20 128.5 —28.5 Comet 1840i.
206 1927—Jan. 10 113.7 —30.0
Mar. 15 273.0 —40.0 Comet 1877i.
228 1929—Mar. 9 272.0 —40.0
232 1929—Mar. 13 272.0 —40.0
238 1929—Mar. 20 272.0 —40.5
243 1931—Mar. 26 276.0 —44.0 Comet 1590, March 8, at 275°, −38°
May 1 334.5 —16.0 Comet 837i.
315 1930—Apl. 29 321.0 —19.0
323 1929—May 2 326.0 —17.5
326 1930—May 4 322.0 —16.0
332 1929—May 5 326.0 —17.5
342 1930—May 6 326.0 —16.5
349 1930—May 7 324.5 —15.0
May 1 296.5 +13.5 Comet 1853ii.
348 1930—May 7 308.0 +15.0 Also 4 other radiants.
380 1929—May 11 307.7 +14.0
Aug. 9 32.0 —18.5 Comet 1877ii.
537 1931—Aug. 9 29.0 —20.0
Aug. 10 40.5 —13.5 Comet 1852ii.
491 1929—Aug. 3 39.5 —15.5
509 1929—Aug. 4 39.0 —16.0
Aug. 26 65.0 —22.0 Comet 1558.
174 1925—Aug. 18 55.2 —28.0 In first report.
Sept. 20 44.5 —24.0 Comet 1763.
86 1928—Sept. 18 36.3 —28.8 In first report.
180 1928—Sept. 22 41.0 —32.0 "
Sept. 20 62.0 —13.0 Comet 961.
181 1928—Sept. 22 60.0 —20.0 In first report.
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Table I.
Details of Observations.
Date. Began. Ended Tl. Meteors. Horary Rate. Factor. Corrected Rate. Ob. Remarks.
1929. h. m. h. m. m.
Jan. 16 02 10 03 20 70 21 14 1.0 14 M Clear.
17 02 10 03 34 84 18 12 1.0 12 M Clear.
20 01 55 02 40 45 8 10 0.7 M Partly cloudy.
21 01 50 03 13 83 10 7 1.0 7 B Clear.
21 02 11 03 40 85 17 13 0.7 18 M Partly cloudy.
Feb. 11 02 11 04 10 119 20 10 1.0 10 M Clear.
14 02 12 04 18 126 22 10 0.8 12 M Clear; clouds ½hr.
Mar. 9 02 12 03 30 78 12 9 1.0 9 M Clear.
11 02 15 03 35 80 14 12 1.0 12 M Slight mist.
14 02 35 04 35 120 15 7 1.0 7 M Clear.
20 03 08 04 45 97 17 10 1.0 10 M Clear.
Apl. 5 02 30 04 00 90 13 9 0.7 13 M Clear; moon 25d.
6 01 15 02 00 45 4 5 1.0 B Clear.
6 02 30 04 45 135 26 11 0.9 13 M Clear; moon 26d.
7 01 00 02 20 57 13 13 0.6 22 M Misty; 23m. clouded.
14 03 36 05 05 83 16 12 0.7 17 M Misty; passing clouds.
16 02 30 05 08 158 40 16 1.0 16 M Slight mist ½hr.
17 02 45 05 10 130 30 14 0.9 16 M Passing clouds.
18 02 40 05 00 140 29 12 1.0 12 M Clear.
22 02 45 05 23 158 37 13 0.6 22 M Clear; moon 12d.
May 3 03 00 05 30 150 36 14 0.5 28 M Clear; moon 22d.
4 02 40 04 00 55 8 M Clouds 45m.; moon 23d.
6 02 30 05 30 180 52 17 0.8 21 M Some cloud; moon 25d.
7 02 30 03 40 70 13 11 0.6 18 M Misty; much cloud.
8 02 30 05 30 155 57 22 1.0 22 M Misty; 25m. off.
9 02 37 05 40 148 46 18 0.9 20 M 35m. clouded.
10 02 50 03 05 6 M Casuals.
11 02 20 03 40 60 12 12 0.6 20 M Clouds 20m.; misty.
12 00 25 05 40 315 80 15 1.0 15 M Clear.
13 02 25 02 50 5 M Almost wholly clouded.
June 1–2 11 52 01 10 78 14 10 0.9 11 M Clear; moon.
2 00 10 02 00 110 17 9 0.9 10 B Some light clouds.
8 01 45 02 20 35 5 8 1.0 B Clear.
9 01 10 03 30 140 27 11 1.0 11 M Clear.
July 3 02 48 05 08 140 29 12 0.8 14 M Clear; moon 23d.
4 02 45 04 45 120 25 12 1.0 12 M Clear.
5 02 45 05 30 165 36 13 1.0 13 M Clear.
6 02 30 04 30 105 26 15 0.9 16 M Fog; 15m. off.
9 02 45 04 00 50 19 23 1.0 M Rain stroms; 25m. off.
11 03 05 04 50 105 35 19 0.9 21 M Clear.
27 02 45 04 30 105 17 10 0.3 M Clear; moon 19d.
29 02 40 04 10 57 22 19 0.5 38 M Clouds 23m.; moon 21d.
31 02 22 03 48 86 23 23 0.8 30 M Clouds 48m.; moon 23d.
Aug. 1 03 30 05 30 120 51 23 0.8 30 M Some clouds; moon 24d.
1–2 20 25 22 08 130
22 20 00 06 106 30 8 1.0 8 B Clear.
2 02 30 05 30 180 67 22. 0.9 25 M Clear; moon 25d.
4 01 10 05 30 260 103 23 1.0 23 M Clear.
4–5 23 45 01 02 77 19 15 1.0 15 B Clear.
5 02 25 04 20 110 54 27 1.0 27 M Clear.
9 02 30 04 30 120 41 20 1.0 20 M Slight mist.
9–10 23 40 01 00 80 19 14 0.9 15 B Some clouds.
13 02 44 04 45 121 41 18 0.9 20 M Slight mist.
14 02 44 04 15 91 24 15 0.8 19 M Passing clouds.
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Sept. 1 00 45 01 40 55 10 11 1.0 11 M Clear.
2 02 54 04 20 86 15 10 1.0 10 M Clear.
12 02 42 03 55 73 16 13 1.0 13 M Clear
30 02 25 04 15 110 18 10 1.0 10 M Slight mist.
Oct. 5 02 30 03 05 35 3 7 1.0 M Slight mist.
6 01 05 03 20 135 21 9 1.0 9 M Clear.
7 02 30 04 05 95 17 11 1.0 11 M Slight mist.
16 02 30 04 05 83 7 M Clear; moon 13d.
17 03 05 03 45 40 2 M Clear; moon 14d.
18 02 50 03 20 30 5 M Clear; moon 15d.
19 03 05 03 25 20 3 M Clear; moon 16d.
29 02 50 03 35 45 13 15 1.0 M Clear.
Dec. 13 1930. 02 25 03 05 40 8 9 1.0 M Clear.
Apl. 30 03 00 05 00 120 27 13 1.0 13 M Clear.
May 3 02 56 05 20 144 37 15 0.9 17 M Slight mist.
5 02 45 05 25 160 72 27 1.0 27 M Clear.
6 02 45 05 25 160 65 24 1.0 24 M Clear.
7 02 30 05 30 180 84 28 1.0 28 M Clear.
8 02 30 05 30 165 63 23 0.9 25 M Passing clouds.
9 02 40 04 25 105 39 22 1.0 22 M Clear.
July 29 20 42 21 47 65 6 6 0.8 7 T Clear.
29 03 26 05 10 104 45 26 0.8 33 M Misty; some clouds.
30 02 45 04 50 125 52 25 1.0 25 M Clear.
31 03 05 04 45 100 39 23 1.0 23 M Clear.
Aug. 1 03 15 05 16 121 66 33 1.0 33 M Clear.
2 02 50 05 00 120 63 32 1.0 32 M Clear; 10m. off.
Sept. 23 1931 03 05 04 10 65 18 16 1.0 16 M Clear.
Feb. 3 20 16 21 16 60 1 1 G Clear; moon 15d.
5 20 26 21 37 71 3 3 G Clear; moon 17d.
8 19 57 22 02 125 13 6 1.0 6 G Clear.
9 20 18 22 13 115 9 4 0.8 7 G Smoke.
11 20 28 21 23 55 6 6 1.0 6 G Clear.
14 19 54 21 36 102 4 2 1.0 2 G Clear.
15 20 28 22 34 126 15 7 0.9 8 G Light clouds.
16 20 47 21 59 72 6 5 1.0 5 G Clear.
18 20 13 22 36 143 19 8 1.0 8 G Clear.
26 20 05 21 05 60 3 3 0.6 5 G Haze; moon 9d.
Mar. 12 20 05 20 12 7 1 G
13 20 10 22 24 134 15 7 1.0 7 G Clear.
14 21 08 22 10 62 7 7 1.0 7 G Clear.
20 20 00 23 43 223 37 10 1.0 10 G Clear.
21 03 05 03 47 42 9 13 1.0 M Mist on horizon.
22 00 30 01 15 45 17 12 1.0 M Clear.
27 02 45 03 35 60 12 5 1.0 5 M Clear.
27 20 13 22 10 117 5 2 0.4 6 G Passing clouds; moon.
28–29 21 30 01 03 213 43 12 0.8 17 G Clear; moon 9d.
30 03 00 03 18 18 7 19 0.9 M Passing clouds.
Apl. 10 20 08 21 45 97 8 6 0.4 15 G Very cloudy.
12–13 20 05 00 22 257 48 11 1.0 11 G Clear.
13 21 05 22 00 55 3 3 0.3 10 G 90% cloud.
14 03 00 05 05 125 33 15 0.9 16 M Clear; moon 23d.
14–15 22 05 01 12 187 43 14 1.0 14 G Clear.
15 03 00 04 20 80 20 15 1.0 15 M Clear.
15 20 45 23 03 138 29 12 1.0 12 G Clear.
17 21 18 22 50 92 15 10 0.8 12 G Passing clouds.
21–22 22 35 00 25 110 29 16 1.0 16 G Clear.
22 21 45 23 00 75 15 12 0.9 13. G Slight clouds.
23 03 00 05 00 120 35 17 0.9 19 M Slight fog.
23–24 22 47 00 15 98 22 13 1.0 13 G Clear.
29 03 00 04 40 100 18 11 0.9 12 M Slight mist.
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May 13 21 43 23 15 92 18 12 0.9 13 G Cloud and haze.
14 02 55 03 35 40 12 18 0.9 M Mist and cloud; moon.
14 21 37 22 33 56 11 12 0.9 13 G Cloud on horizon.
15 20 47 22 02 75 13 10 0.9 11 G Clear.
22–23 22 43 00 00 77 17 13 1.0 13 G Clear.
June 7 20 45 23 00 135 27 12 0.9 13 G Clear.
14 20 55 23 05 130 18 8 0.7 11 G Much passing cloud.
15–16 19 53 01 00 307 67 13 0.9 14 G Slight haze at first.
18–19 22 52 01 18 146 34 14 1.0 14 G Clear.
19–20 23 13 02 33 200 56 17 1.0 17 G Clear.
July 6 21 57 23 13 76 15 12 0.7 17 G Passing cloud.
10–11 21 37 00 22 165 35 13 0.8 16 G 30% cloud.
14–15 20 50 21 00
22 15 02 20 255 48 11 0.5 22 G 60% cloud.
15–16 21 57 00 05 128 21 11 0.4 28 G 70% cloud.
16 02 57 03 40 43 12 18 M Partially cloud.
16 20 39 22 24
23 12 23 58 155 28 11 0.5 22 G 50% cloud.
17 22 45 23 30 45 7 9 0.3 G 70% cloud.
20–21 20 05 01 55 330 61 11 0.7 16 G 25% cloud; moon 5d.
Aug. 2 19 30 22 00 150 16 6 0.3 20 G 50% cloud; moon.
4–5 21 40 00 40 180 28 9 0.7 13 G 20% cloud; moon.
5 20 15 24 00 225 64 17 1.0 17 G Clear.
6–7 21 43 00 02 139 52 22 1.0 22 G Clear.
7–8 22 33 01 00 147 58 22 1.0 22 G Clear.
9–10 22 30 03 30 300 86 17 0.8 21 G 20% cloud.
10 22 05 22 35 30 6 12 0.5 G Almost totally clouded.
13–14 21 25 02 25 300 69 14 1.0 14 G Clear.
14–15 22 23 00 25 122 30 15 1.0 15 G Clear.
21 01 26 05 00 214 44 12 1.0 12 G Clear.
Oct. 2–3 22 45 00 45 120 22 11 0.9 12 G Much haze.
12 02 08 02 45 37 3 6 M Almost totally clouded.
14 02 25 03 28 63 7 7 0.9 7 M Some clouds.
15–16 23 30 01 20 110 9 4 B Almost totally clouded.
16 02 40 03 45 65 7 7 M Almost totally clouded.
17 00 00 03 30 210 34 9 1.0 9 B Clear.
17 00 00 03 30 210 15 4 1.0 4 Bu Clear.
23 02 25 03 50 85 11 8 0.9 12 M Clear; moon.
Nov. 15 01 18 02 30 72 8 7 0.5 16 Mo 50% cloud.
15 02 28 03 15 47 3 4 1.0 B Clear.
16 02 15 03 15 60 15 11 1.0 11 M Clear, twilight.
16 02 00 02 30 30 0 G 70% cloud.
18 01 50 03 00 70 13 11 0.9 12 G Hazy.
Dec. 3–4 22 21 01 07 166 32 12 0.8 15 G 35% cloud.
4–5 22 38 01 12 154 35 12 0.8 15 G 20% cloud.
10–11 23 32 01 20 108 24 13 0.8 16 G Hazy, twilight at end.
14 02 00 03 00 60 7 M Casual watch.
28 21 07 22 07 60 8 8 0.9 9 G Hazy.
30 21 05 22 55 110 11 6 0.9 7 G Some cloud.
– 444 –

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Table II.
List of Radiant Points Observed.
Radiant.
No. Date. G.M.T. R.A. Dec. Mets. Wt. Obs. L. Remarks.
° ° °
205 1929—Jan. 15.64 107.0 —36.0 5 F M 204.7
206 1929—Jan. 15.64 120.0 —29.0 6 G M " Comet 1840i; NZ 1.
207 1929—Jan. 15.64 132.2 + 7.0 4 G M "
208 1929—Jan. 16.64 134.0 -57.0 7 G M 205.7
209 1929—Jan. 16.64 177.7 —18.6 7 G M " D. 132, 1; 132, 2; ?212.
210 1929—Jan. 19.62 162.1 —13.7 5 G M 208.7 NZ 2.
211 1929—Jan. 20.64 132.5 —50.5 5 G M 209.7 NZ 130, 214.
212 1929—Jan. 20.64 177.0 —11.0 5 F M " ? 219.
213 1929—Jan. 20.64 144.0 —42.0 4 F M "
214 1929—Jan. 21.60 130.0 —54.0 3 P B 210.7 211, 130.
215 1931—Feb. 8–9 53.0 —23.0 4–5 F G 229.3 223.
216 1931—Feb. 8–9 89.0 —43.5 4 G G "
217 1931—Feb. 8–9 94.5 —27.4 4–5 G G "
218 1929—Feb. 10.65 206.5 —43.4 5 G M 230.7 222; ? Comet 1887iii.
219 1929—Feb. 10.65 212.9 —67.0 3 G M "
220 1929—Feb. 10.65 221.5 —39.1 5 G M "
221 1929—Feb. 13.66 189.0 —61.0 3 F M 233.7
222 1929—Feb. 13.66 205.5 —42.2 6 G M " 218.
223 1931—Feb. 15–18 53.0 —19.3 5 F G 237.2 215.
224 1931—Feb. 15–18 59.5 —27.0 3 P G "
225 1931—Feb. 15–18 71.0 —42.0 4 F G "
226 1929—Mar. 9.64 241.5 -43.0 7 F M 257.7
227 1929—Mar. 9.64 235.0 —19.0 4 P M 257.7 D. 178, NZ 138.
228 1929—Mar. 9.64 272.0 —40.0 4 P M " CrA.
229 1931—Mar. 13.41 29.0 —26.0 1 F G 261.0 Stationary meteor.
230 1931—Mar. 13.41 100.0 —47.5 3 F G "
231 1929—Mar. 13.67 231.3 —42.0 5 G M 261.6 ? BAA 158.
232 1929—Mar. 13.67 272.0 —40.0 3 F M " CrA.
233 1931—Mar. 13.14 72.0 —53.5 7 G G 261.5 Inc. 1 stain.
234 1931—Mar. 13–14 170.0 —40.0 5 F G " ? 244.
235 1931—Mar. 20.43 197.0 —31.0 4 F G 268.0
236 1931—Mar. 20.43 219.0 —45.0 5–7 G G "
237 1929—Mar. 20.68 272.0 —21.5 4 G M 268.6
238 1929—Mar. 20.68 272.0 —40.5 7 G M " CrA.
239 1931—Mar. 21.66 176.0 —24.0 4 F M 269.1 9, 240, AMS 888; Comet 1556.
240 1931—Mar. 26.66 180.0 —24.0 2 F M 274.1 9, 239; Comet 1264.
241 1931—Mar. 26.66 219.0 —11.5 5 F M " ? 246.
242 1931—Mar. 26.66 241.5 —27.0 5 G M " ? 10.
243 1931—Mar. 26.66 276.0 —44.0 5 F M " CrA
244 1931—Mar. 28.49 178.0 —41.0 4–5 F G 276.0 ? 234.
245 1931—Mar. 28.49 213.0 —45.0 3–4 G G "
246 1931—Mar. 28.49 217.5 —15.5 5 G G " ? 241.
247 1931—Mar. 28.49 240.5 —19.5 3 F G " BAA 21.
248 1931—Mar. 28.49 247.5 —39.0 3 F G "
249 1929—Apl. 3–6 241.0 —4.0 5 G M D. 187, 4; 187, 5; 178?
250 1929—Apl. 3–6 261.5 —32.0 7 G M
251 1929—Apl. 4–6 230.0 —21.0 8 G M Chi Lib.
252 1929—Apl. 4–6 247.5 —50.0 7 G M D. 189.
253 1929—Apl. 4–6 285.0 —53.0 7 G M ?11
254 1929—Apl. 5–6 212.0 —13.0 6 G M D. 166, 4; 166, 8; 158, 11; AMS 924.
255 1931—Apl. 13.42 191.5 —15.5 6 G G 291.6 266.
256 1931—Apl. 13.42 205.5 + 0.7 5–7 G G " 267.
257 1931—Apl. 13.42 209.0 —27.0 5–7 F G " Comet 1737i.
258 1931—Apl. 13.42 218.0 —64.5 4 G G " 268.
259 1931—Apl. 13.42 235.0 —18.0 5 F G " Chi Lib.
260 1931—Apl. 13.69 233.5 —19.5 8 G M 291.8 Chi Lib.
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261 1931—Apl. 13.69 260.5 —36.0 5 G M 291.8 29. 279, ? 290.
262 1931—Apl. 13.69 266.0 —9.5 2 F M " Nu Oph.
263 1929—Apl. 13.70 232.5 —20.5 6 G M 292.3 Chi Lib.
264 1929—Apl. 13.70 270.0 —10.0 4 F M " Nu Oph
265 1929—Apl. 13.70 307.5 —65.0 4 G M " ? 281.
266 1931—Apl. 14.50 192.0 —14.0 3 G G 292.7 255; ? D. 158, 19.
267 1931—Apl. 14.50 209.0 —4.0 3 F G " 256; ? D. 158, 14.
268 1931—Apl. 14.50 215.0 —65.0 4–5 G G " 258.
269 1931—Apl. 14.50 233.5 —39.0 6 G G " 273.
270 1931—Apl. 14.50 275.5 —32.5 3 F G " Delta Sgr.
271 1931—Apl. 13–14 279.0 —39.0 5–6 F M 292.4 Delta Sgr.
272 1931—Apl. 13–14 304.5 —34.5 7–8 G M " Sgr.
273 1931—Apl. 15.43 234.0 —40.0 6 G G 293.6 269.
274 1931—Apl. 15.43 237.0 —19.5 3 P G " Chi Lib.
275 1931—Apl. 15.43 270.0 —10.0 2 P G " Nu Oph.
276 1931—Apl. 15.43 275.0 —30.0 2 F G " Delta Sgr.
277 1929—Apl. 15.68 152.5 —67.0 3 F M 294.2
278 1929—Apl. 15.68 233.5 —20.0 3 G M " Chi Lib.
279 1929—Apl. 15.68 260.0 —36.0 10 G M " 261, 299, ? 290.
280 1929—Apl. 15.68 269.0 —9.0 4 F M " Nu Oph.
281 1929—Apl. 15.68 301.0 —68.0 2 P M " ? 265.
282 1929—Apl. 15.68 301.0 —31.0 5 G M " Sgr.
283 1929—Apl. 16.69 238.3 —21.0 4 G M 295.2 Chi Lib.
284 1929—Apl. 16.69 267.0 —10.0 2 P M " Nu Oph.
285 1929—Apl. 16.69 288.0 +7.7 7 G M " Aql.
286 1929—Apl. 16.69 300.0 —30.5 4 G M " Sgr.
287 1929—Apl. 16.69 300.0 —53.0 3 F M " ? 16, ? 294.
288 1931—Apl. 17.44 226.5 —23.0 3 F G 295.5 ? 297.
289 1929—Apl. 17.68 232.5 —21.0 2 P M 296.2 Chi Lib.
290 1929—Apl. 17.68 258.5 —42.5 6 G M " ? 261, ? 279.
291 1929—Apl. 17.68 269.0 —10.0 3 G M " Nu Oph.
292 1929—Apl. 17.68 273.5 —28.5 5 G M " Delta Sgr.
293 1929—Apl. 17.68 290.0 +7.0 2 P M " Aql.
294 1929—Apl. 17.68 297.0 —57.5 2 P M " 146, ? 287.
295 1929—Apl. 17.68 300.0 —30.5 2 P M " Sgr.
296 1931—Apl. 21.50 203.5 —22.4 4–5 F G 299.5
297 1931—Apl. 21.50 229.5 —18.7 5 G G " ? Chi Lib.; ? 288.
298 1931—Apl. 21.50 269.0 —45.5 4 G G " ? Chi Lib.; ? 288.
299 1931—Apl. 21.50 269.5 —37.3 4 F G " 261, 279, ? 290.
300 1929—Apl. 21.69 238.5 —21.7 3 F M 300.0 Chi Lib.
301 1929—Apl. 21.69 272.2 32.7 6 G M " Lyrids.
302 1929—Apl. 21.69 277.0 —34.7 7 G M " Delta Sgr.
303 1929—Apl. 21.69 289.3 + 2.5 7 G M " Aql.
304 1929—Apl. 21.69 303.0 —30.0 4 G M " Sgr.
305 1931—Apl. 22.69 245.0 —35.0 4–5 F M 300.7
306 1931—Apl. 22.69 272.0 —14.0 3 P M 300.7 Nu Oph.
307 1931—Apl. 22.69 272.5 +33.0 4 G M " Lyrids.
308 1931—Apl. 22.69 278.0 —34.0 2–3 F M " Delta Sgr.
309 1931—Apl. 23.50 259.0 —67.5 3 P G 301.5
310 1931—Apl. 28.68 285.0 —38.0 3–4 G M 306.5 318.
311 1931—Apl. 28.68 325.0 —28.5 3 F M "
312 1931—Apl. 28.68 330.5 −5.0 2 ? M " ? Early Aquarids.
313 1930—Apl. 29.69 231.0 —28.7 5 G M 307.7
314 1930—Apl. 29.69 270.0 —10.0 4–5 F M " Nu Oph.
315 1930—Apl. 29.69 321.0 —19.0 3 F M " Delta Cap.
316 1930—Apl. 29.69 330.3 −3.5 5 F M " Aquarids.
317 1930—May 2.69 270.5 —27.0 2 F M 310.6 Lambda Sgr.
318 1930—May 2.69 286.0 —37.0 3 F M " D. 217, 1; NZ 310.
319 1930—May 2.69 334.0 −2.0 19 G M " Aquarids.
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320 1929—May 2.70 272.5 —35.0 8 G M 310.9 Lambda Sgr.
321 1929—May 2.70 334.0 −1.5 18 G M " Aquarids.
322 1929—May 2–3 313.0 —42.0 5 G M "
323 1929—May 2–3 326.0 —17.5 3 F M " Delta Cap.
324 1930—May 4.69 271.0 —29.0 3 F M 312.6 Lambda Sgr.
325 1930—May 4.69 302.3 —21.5 6 G M "
326 1930—May 4.69 322.0 —16.0 3 F M " Delta Cap.
327 1930—May 4.69 324.0 −4.5 6–7 G M " Inc.1 stn. Alpha Aqr.
328 1930—May 4.69 326.0 —35.0 3 F M " Iota PsA.
329 1930—May 4.69 336.5 −1.5 36 G M " Aquarids.
330 1929—May 5.69 257.0 0.0 3 F M 313.9 D. 193, 1.
331 1929—May 5.69 272.0 —27.3 8 G M " Lambda Sgr.
332 1929—May 5.69 326.0 —17.5 6 G M " Delta Cap.
333 1929—May 5.69 327.4 —35.0 6 G M " Iota PsA.
334 1929—May 5.69 337.5 −1.0 19 G M " Aquarids.
335 1930—May 5.69 277.0 —27.0 3 F M 313.6 Lambda Sgr.
336 1930—May 5.69 327.0 —33.0 2–3 P M " Iota PsA.
337 1930—May 5.69 337.0 −1.0 33 G M " Aquarids.
338 1929—May 6.65 338.6 0.0 5 F M 314.9 Aquarids.
339 1929—May 6.69 272.0 —27.0 5 G M 314.6 Lambda Sgr.
340 1930—May 6.69 305.0 17.0 3 F M " Beta Del.
341 1930—May 6.69 325.5 —34.5 4–5 G M " Iota PsA.
342 1930—May 6.69 326.0 —16.5 3 F M " Delta Cap.
343 1930—May 6.69 327.0 −2.5 8–9 G M " Alpha Aqr.
344 1930—May 6.69 338.0 −0.5 38 G M " Aquarids.
345 1930—May 6.69 356.0 −5.0 4 G M "
346 1930—May 7.68 270.0 —30.0 3 P M 315.6 Lambda Sgr.
347 1930—May 7.68 298.5 −1.2 4 F M " D. 230, 5.
348 1930—May 7.68 308.0 15.0 5 G M " Beta Del.
349 1930—May 7.68 324.5 —15.0 3 F M " Delta Cap.
350 1930—May 7.68 329.0 −1.0 5–7 G M " Alpha Aqr.
351 1930—May 7.68 339.0 0.0 28 G M " Aquarids.
352 1930—May 7.68 351.0 —46.0 3 F M "
353 1929—May 7.69 249.0 —15.0 4 F M 315.9 D. 190, 3.
354 1929—May 7.69 271.0 —10.0 3 F M "
355 1929—May 7.69 302.5 —12.5 7 G M " Beta Cap.
356 1929—May 7.69 307.0 14.0 3 F M " Beta Del.
357 1929—May 7.69 308.0 —48.0 6 G M " Alpha Ind.
358 1929—May 7.69 339.0 −0.4 24 G M " Aquarids.
359 1930—May 8.67 307.5 +14.5 3 G M 316.5 Beta Del.
360 1930—May 8.67 330.0 −1.0 3 G M " Alpha Aqr.
361 1930—May 8.67 336.5 −0.5 3–4 G M "
362 1930—May 8.67 338.0 —30.5 5 G M "
363 1930—May 8.67 340.0 + 0.5 13 G M 316.5 Aquarids.
364 1929—May 8.69 273.0 —32.0 3 P M 316.8 Lambda Sgr.
365 1929—May 8.69 302.5 —15.0 9 G M " Beta Cap.
366 1929—May 8.69 307.5 —14.5 4 G M " Beta Del.
367 1929—May 8.69 308.0 —49.0 6 G M " Alpha Ind.
368 1929—May 8.69 325.0 —36.0 2 P M " Iota PsA.
369 1929—May 8.69 339.0 + 0.3 10 G M " Aquarids.
370 1930—May 7–8 310.5 —49.3 5 G M 316.0 Alpha Ind.
371 1929—May 7–10 245.0 —60.0 3 F M 317.9 BAA 163.
372 1929—May 9–10 275.0 —32.5 3 F M " Lambda Sgr.
373 1929—May 9–10 300.0 —26.0 3 F M " 378.
374 1931—May 11.66 339.5 + 2.0 2 P M 319.2 ? Aquarids.
375 1929—May 11.69 237.5 + 1.0 4 P M 319.7 ? D. 177, 9; ? D. 187, 6.
376 1929—May 11.69 242.0 —30.5 10 G M "
377 1929—May 11.69 275.0 —28.0 3 P M " Lambda Sgr.
378 1929—May 11.69 301.0 —24.5 8 G M " 373.
379 1929—May 11.69 302.0 —15.0 7 F M " Beta Cap.
380 1929—May 11.69 307.7 +14.0 7 G M " Beta Del.
381 1929—May 11.69 342.7 + 2.5 21 G M " Aquarids.
– 447 –

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382 1931—May 13.66 341.0 + 2.0 3 P M 321.2 ? Aquarids.
383 1931—May 13–14 234.0 −54.0 4 G G 321.6
384 1931—May 22.49 259.0 −23.5 7 G G 329.7 ? 25, ? 32.
385 1929—June 1.54 286.5 −38.0 4 F M 340.0 152.
386 1931—June 7.43 264.5 −42.5 8 G G 345.3
387 1929—June 8.62 272.0 −12.0 4 P M 346.9 D. 204, 3; AMS 1040.
388 1929—June 8.62 277.0 −35.0 9 G M " 156; D. 210, 4.
389 1929—June 8.62 296.0 + 1.0 4 F M " D. 230, 7; AMS 1069.
390 1929—June 8.62 327.0 + 0.5 3 G M " D. 251, 1; D. 260, 1.
391 1931—June 14.44 275.5 —27.0 3 P G 352.1 Lambda Sgr.
392 1931—June 15.46 254.0 —51.5 6–7 G G 353.1
393 1931—June 15.46 268.5 —28.0 4–5 G G " D. 210, 5.
394 1931—June 15.46 276.5 —26.5 4–5 G G " Lambda Sgr.
395 1931—June 15.46 285.0 —15.0 11 G G " D. 218, 3; NZ 402.
396 1931—June 15.46 291.0 —27.5 4–5 F G " ? 40.
397 1931—June 15.46 313.5 —55.0 3–4 F G "
398 1931—June 18.52 272.5 —23.0 3–4 F G 356.0 ? Lambda Sgr.
399 1931—June 18.52 292.0 −5.0 4–6 G G " ? Lambda Sgr.
400 1931—June 18.52 292.0 —18.0 6–8 G G " ? 403.
401 1931—June 19.56 277.8 —24.5 6 G G 357.0 Lambda Sgr.
402 1931—June 19.56 282.0 —11.5 4 F G " 395; D. 218, 3; AMS 1040.
403 1931—June 19.56 289.0 —18.0 3 F G " 400.
404 1929—July 2.69 10.0 + 5.0 8 P M 10.3 D. 2, 1; Comet 1864ii.
405 1929—July 2.69 310.5 —13.0 3 F M " 410; AMS 1098; D. 249, 1.
406 1929—July 2.69 334.0 —30.0 8 G M " Beta PsA.
407 1929—July 2.69 348.5 9.5 5 G M " Psi 1 Aqr.
408 1929—July 2.69 353.0 +25.0 5 P M " D. 5, 1; ?D. 274, 1; Comet 1908c.
409 1929—July 3.68 286.0 —28.0 6 F M 11.3 D. 221, 2; 227, 3; BAA 177.
410 1929—July 3.68 310.5 —14.0 4 F M " 405; AMS 1098; D. 249, 1.
411 1929—July 3.68 334.0 —31.0 5 G M " Beta PsA.
412 1929—July 3.68 348.5 −9.0 4 G M " Psi 1 Aqr.
413 1929—July 2–3 326.0 —22.0 4 G M ? 45.
414 1929—July 4.69 316.0 —36.0 7 F M 12.2 425; ? D. 239, 1.
415 1929—July 4.69 334.0 —32.0 5 F M " Beta PsA.
416 1929—July 4.69 348.5 −9.0 10 G M " Psi 1 Aqr.
417 1929—July 5.67 290.0 −9.0 6 F M 13.1 D. 226, 6.
418 1929—July 5.67 301.0 −7.5 4 F M 13.1 D. 226, 6.
419 1929—July 5.67 350.0 9.0 4 F M " Psi 1 Aqr.
420 1929-July 6.46 287.0 —23.8 4 G G 13.3 54; 431.
421 1929—July 8.66 348.5 −8.0 5 G M 16.0 Psi 1 Aqr.
422 1929—July 10.69 302.0 —15.0 6 F M 17.9 D. 26, 1.
423 1929—July 10.69 302.0 —15.0 6 F M " Cap. II.
424 1929—July 10.69 351.0 —41.0 5 G M " 449; D. 275, 1.
425 1929—July 8–10 312.0 —34.0 4 P M 17.0 414.
426 1931—July 10–11 260.0 —60.0 4 G G 17.7
427 1931—July 10–11 305.0 —64.0 4 G G "
428 1931—July 10–11 306.0 —30.7 5 G G "
429 1931—July 10–11 323.0 —42.0 5 G G " 66
430 1931—July 14.49 25.0 −8.5 3 G G 21.2 Inc. 1 stn. 49.
431 1931—July 14.49 291.7 —22.0 6–7 G G " 54, 63, 420.
432 1931—July 14.49 307.0 −7.5 3 F G " Cap. I.
433 1931—July 14.49 324.0 —52.0 4 G G " Cap. I.
434 1931—July 14.49 309.0 —23.5 3 G G 21.4
435 1931—July 14–15 302.0 —17.0 6 G G 21.7 Cap. II.
436 1931—July 14–15 344.0 —29.7 4 G G " Cap. II.
437 1931—July 16–17 277.5 —37.0 6 G G 23.7 ? 53, A1461.
438 1931—July 16–17 300.5 —18.0 4–5 F G " Cap. II.
– 448 –

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439 1931—July 20.49 267.0 —30.0 5 G G 27.0 62; Comet 568.
440 1931—July 20.49 311.0 —10.0 15 G G " Cap. I.
441 1931—July 20.49 351.5 —39.0 4 G G "
442 1929—July 26.67 337.0 —33.0 4 P M 33.5 Alpha PsA.
443 1929—July 26.67 339.0 —17.0 5 G M " Delta Aquarids.
444 1929—July 28.66 341.0 —16.5 8 G M 35.5 Delta Aquarids.
445 1930—July 28.70 341.0 17.0 26 G M 36.7 Delta Aquarids.
446 1930—July 29.68 27.0 —11.0 3 F M " ? 464.
447 1930—July 29.68 341.7 —15.7 21 G M " Delta Aquarids.
448 1930—July 29.68 346.0 —26.0 4 G M " Alpha PsA.
449 1930—July 29.68 355.0— 40.0 3 F M " 424; D. 275, 1.
450 1930—July 28–29 3.0 —21.5 5 G M 36.2 Beta Cet.
451 1930—July 28–29 10.0 —34.0 7–8 F M " ? 457; AMS 547.
452 1930—July 28–29 308.0 —10.0 8 F M " Cap. I.
453 1930—July 30.65 343.5 —15.5 12 G M 37.4 Delta Aquarids.
454 1930—July 30.68 343.0 —30.0 5 P M 37.7 Alpha PsA.
455 1930—July 30.68 344.0 —15.5 14 G M " Delta Aquarids.
456 1930—July 31.70 2.5 —19.5 2 P M 38.7 Beta Cet.
457 1930—July 31.70 17.0 —35.0 3–6 P M " ? 451.
458 1930—July 31.70 37.0 —37.5 3–5 F M "
459 1930—July 31.70 343.0 —29.0 5–6 F M " Alpha PsA.
460 1930—July 31.70 344.5 —15.0 22 G M " Delta Aquarids.
461 1930—July 31.70 346.0 —22.0 5–7 G M " 475.
462 1930—July 31.70 351.0 + 5.0 5–6 P M " Iota Psc.
463 1929—July 31.71 6.0 —20.0 3 F M 38.4 Beta Cet. ?
464 1929—July 31.71 33.0 —14.5 3. F M " ? 446.
465 1929—July 31.71 49.0 +22.0 4 G M " 492, 511.
466 1929—July 31.71 66.0 —42.0 4 P M " 481, ? 494.
467 1929—July 31.71 342.0—33.0 9 F M " Alpha PsA.
468 1929—July 31.71 344.5 —15.0 9 G M " Delta Aquarids.
469 1929—Aug. 1.45 343.0 —18.0 3–5 G B 39.7 Inc. I stn.
470 1929—Aug. 1.45 347.5 —14.0 6 G B " Delta Aquarids.
471 1930—Aug. 1.68 6.0 —41.0 4 F M 39.5 84.
472 1930—Aug. 1.68 39.0 −1.5 5 F M " 510.
473 1930—Aug. 1.68 51.0 —40.0 5 F M "
474 1930—Aug. 1.68 317.0 —22.5 10 G M 39.5 ? 497, ? 549.
475 1930—Aug. 1.68 345.0 —24.5 7 G M " 461.
476 1930—Aug. 1.68 346.0 —14.0 11 G M " Delta Aquarids.
477 1930—Aug. 1.68 352.0 + 3.5 4 G M " Iota Psc.
478 1929—Aug. 1.69 7.5 —21.0 5–7 G M 39.4 Beta Cet.
479 1929—Aug. 1.69 52.0 —24.0 3 P M "
480 1929—Aug. 1.69 54.0 + 1.0 4 F M " 493, D. 49, 2.
481 1929—Aug. 1.69 64.0 —41.5 4–6 F M " 466, ? 494.
482 1929—Aug. 1.69 342.6 +32.2 5 G M " Alpha Psc.
483 1929—Aug. 1.69 345.7 —14.5 19 G M " Delta Aquarids.
484 1929—Aug. 1.69 350.5 + 2.5 6–7 G M " Iota Psc.
485 1929—Aug. 1.69 359.0 —21.0 3–4 G M " Beta Cet.
486 1931—Aug. 2.39 343.0 —16.0 3–4 F G 39.6 Delta Aquarids.
487 1929—Aug. 1–3 67.0 —31.0 4 G M 40.3
488 1929—Aug. 3.66 2.5 —20.0 4–6 F M 41.3 Beta Cet.
489 1929—Aug. 3.66 22.0 +18.0 3 P M " 508, D. 16, 1; 16, 3; AMS 68, AMS 588.
490 1929—Aug. 3.66 27.0 +21.0 5 F M " D. 27, 5; AMS 594, 206.
491 1929—Aug. 3.66 39.5 —15.5 10 G M " 509; Comets 1852ii and 1877ii.
492 1929—Aug. 3.66 48.0 —21.0 5–6 G M " D. 34, 1; NZ 465, 511, 531.
493 1929—Aug. 3.66 55.0 + 2.0 3 F M " 480, D. 49, 2.
494 1929—Aug. 3.66 75.0 —41.0 4 F M " ? 466, ? 481.
495 1929—Aug. 3.66 303.5—10.5 7 G M " Alpha Cap.
496 1929—Aug. 3.66 319.0—16.0 6 G M " Iota Cap.
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497 1929—Aug. 3.66 324.0 —23.0 7 P M 41.3 ?474, D. 252, 11, 249, 11; 252, 9; AMS 1125, 1483, 1485.
498 1929—Aug. 3.66 335.0 —45.5 3 F M "
499 1929—Aug. 3.66 337.5 +12.5 4 G M " D. 261, 11; 261, 15.
500 1929—Aug. 3.66 346.0 —33.0 12 G M " Alpha PsA.
501 1929—Aug. 3.60 347.3 —13.7 17 G M " Delta Aquarids.
502 1931—Aug. 4.49 342.5 —33.5 4–5 G G 41.5 Alpha PsA.
503 1931—Aug. 4.49 348.0 —15.0 9 G G " Delta Aquarids.
504 1929—Aug. 4.54 327.0 —15.3 4 G B 42.1 ? Iota Cap.
505 1929—Aug. 4.54 321.0 −2.0 3 G B " Beta Aqr.
506 1929—Aug. 4.66 0.5 —23.5 4 F M 42.2 Beta Cet.
507 1929—Aug. 4.66 9.0 —12.5 5 G M " 542, D. 4, 2.
508 1929—Aug. 4.66 23.0 +16.0 3 F M " 489.
509 1929—Aug. 4.66 39.0 —16.0 4–5 G M " 491, Comets 1852ii, 1877i.
510 1929—Aug. 4.66 39.0 + 1.0 3 F M " 472.
511 1929—Aug. 4.66 49.0 —21.0 2–3 F M " 465, 492, ? 531.
512 1929—Aug. 4.66 304.0 —10.5 2 F M " Alpha Cap.
513 1929—Aug. 4.66 333.5 −0.5 4 F M " Zeta Aqr. Inc. 1 stn.
514 1929—Aug. 4.66 347.0 —33.0 4 P M " Alpha PsA.
515 1929—Aug. 4.66 348.5 —13.3 10 G M " Delta Aquarids.
516 1929—Aug. 2–4 304.0 —11.0 7 G G 40.5 Alpha Cap.
517 1931—Aug. 5.44 321.0 −9.0 13 G G " Beta Aqr.
518 1931—Aug. 5.44 322.0 —17.5 13 G G " Iota Cap.
519 1931—Aug. 5.44 336.0 —13.0 9 G G " Sigma Aqr.
520 1931—Aug. 5.44 350.0 —14.0 4–5 G G " Delta Aquarids.
521 1931—Aug. 6.47 288.5 —45.5 3 P G 43.5
522 1931—Aug. 6.47 319.5 −6.5 3 F G " Beta Aqr.
523 1931—Aug. 6.47 349.5 —14.0 10 G G " Delta Aquarids.
524 1931—Aug. 5–6 297.0 —22.0 8 P G " 525, ? 63.
525 1931—Aug. 7.51 297.0 —22.0 6 F G 44.5 524, ? 63.
526 1931—Aug. 7.51 324.0 —14.5 6 G G " Iota Cap.
527 1931—Aug. 7.51 336.0 0.0 4 G G " Zeta Aqr.
528 1931—Aug. 7.51 351.0 —19.5 3 G G " dI Aqr.
529 1931—Aug. 7.51 352.0 —12.5 12 G G 44.5 Delta Aquarids.
530 1929—Aug. 8.67 6.0 +12.5 4 G M 46.1 D. 3, 7; 3, 10.
531 1929—Aug. 8.67 43.5 —27.0 4 G M " ? 511, ? 492.
532 1929—Aug. 8.67 271.0 —34.5 1 G M " 1 stn.
533 1929—Aug. 8.67 321.0 −6.0 3 F M " Beta Aqr.
534 1929—Aug. 8.67 350.0 —30.5 5 G M " Alpha PsA.
535 1929—Aug. 8.67 352.3 —11.5 8 G M " Delta Aquarids.
536 1931—Aug. 9.56 18.5 + 2.5 3 G G 46.5
537 1931—Aug. 9.56 29.0 —20.0 6 G G " Comet 1877ii.
538 1931—Aug. 9.56 336.5 −1.0 5 G G " Zeta Aqr.
539 1931—Aug. 9.56 340.3 —20.7 7–8 G G " Alpha PsA.
540 1931—Aug. 9.56 352.0 —21.5 6 G G " dl Aqr.
541 1931—Aug. 9.56 352.5 —12.0 10 G G " Delta Aquarids.
542 1929—Aug. 12.68 9.5 —14.0 3–4 G M 50.0 507.
543 1929—Aug. 12.68 22.5 −7.5 4–5 G M " D 24, 1.
544 1929—Aug. 12.68 80.0 —42.5 4 F M "
545 1929—Aug. 12.68 326.0 —35.4 5 G M " ? 559, AMS 1493.
546 1929—Aug. 12.68 330.7 —13.4 5 G M " Sigma Aqr.
547 1929—Aug. 12.68 350.0 —21.5 1 G M " dI Aqr.
548 1931—Aug. 13.52 11.0 —30.5 10 P G 50.2 557.
549 1931—Aug. 13.52 314.0 —23.0 5–6 G G " ? 474, ? 497.
550 1931—Aug. 13.52 335.0 —13.0 5 G G " Sigma Aqr.
551 1931—Aug. 13.52 336.5 -26.0 3–6 F G " 75.
552 1931—Aug. 13.52 350.5 −5.7 7–9 G G " BAA 1103 ?, AMS 1191?
553 1929—Aug. 13.67 350.0 -60.0 3 P M 51.0 ? 78, D. 269, 1.
554 1929—Aug. 13.67 350.0 —22.0 2–4 F M " ?77, dl Aqr.
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555 1929—Aug. 12–13 2.5 —36.0 6 G M 50.5
556 1929—Aug. 12–13 14.0 —42.0 6 P M "
557 1931—Aug. 14.50 11.5 —33.0 3 P G 51.2 548.
558 1931—Aug. 14.50 23.7 —15.0 1 G G " 1 stn.
559 1931—Aug. 14.50 327.0 —30.0 7 G G " ?545.
560 1931—Aug. 21.66 39.0 −9.5 5 G G 58.3
561 1931—Aug. 21.66 52.5 −9.5 3 G G " 567; Comet 1596, 1845iii.
562 1931—Aug. 21.66 61.0 −2.5 5 G G "
563 1931—Aug. 21.66 81.5 −7.5 1 G G " 1 stn.
564 1931—Aug. 21.66 103.0 —50.3 4 G G "
565 1929—Aug. 31.57 11.0 —17.0 3 G M 68.8 ? D. 14.
566 1929—Sept. 1.66 44.8 —19.7 4 G M 69.8 ? D. 34.
567 1929—Sept. 1.66 55.0 —11.5 5 G M " ? D. 51, 7; NZ 561; Comet 1845iii.
568 1930—Sept. 22.67 82.0 +15.0 3–5 F M 90.3
569 1930—Sept. 22.67 84.0 + 4.0 1—3 F M "
570 1931—Oct. 2.51 28.7 −9.5 4 P G 99.3
571 1931—Oct. 2.51 55.0 −5.0 4 G G "
572 1929—Oct. 5.61 41.4 −2.3 6 G M 102.8 D. 41, 3.
573 1929—Oct. 5.61 59.1 −13.2 6 G M " D. 51, 9; 51, 10.
574 1929—Oct. 5–6 67.6 + 7.3 8 G M 103.3 See D. 57.
575 1929—Oct. 5–6 74.0 —52.5 4 F M "
576 1929—Oct. 5–6 98.0 +15.0 5 F M " D. 79.
577 1931—Oct. 16–61 31.5 —12.0 3–4 F B 113.2
578 1931—Oct. 16.61 59.0 −8.5 3–4 G B " Comet 1580.
579 1931—Oct. 16.61 86.0 —16.0 6 G B " D. 71, 3; ? 100.
580 1931—Oct. 16.61 96.0 —17.0 3 P B " Alpha CMa.
581 1931—Oct. 16.61 96.0 —16.0 4 P Bu " Alpha CMa.
582 1931—Oct. 22.65 98.0 +15.3 3 F M 119.1 Orionids.
583 1931—Oct. 22.65 99.0 —17.0 3 P M " Alpha CMa.
584 1931—Nov. 15.64 115.0 −9.3 1 G M 143.0 1 stn.
585 1931—Nov. 18.62 150.7 +21.4 4 G G 146.0 Leonids.
586 1931—Dec. 3.51 73.5 +12.0 3 F G 160.8 AMS 417.
587 1931—Dec 3.51 117.0 —40.0 6 G G " 592.
588 1931—Dec. 3.51 122.0 —50.8 5 G G "
589 1931—Dec. 4.51 65.0 −8.3 2 G G 161.8 1 stn.
590 1931—Dec. 4.51 92.3 +19.5 4 F G " AMS 295.
591 1931—Dec. 4.51 113.0 —44.8 5–6 G G " Sigma Pup.
592 1931—Dec. 4.51 118.3 —40.8 3 F G " 587.
593 1931—Dec. 3–4 102.0 +27.5 2 P G 161.3 Geminids.
594 1931—Dec. 3–4 102.3 —48.2 5 G G " ?124.
595 1931—Dec. 3–4 147.0 —47.5 5 G G "
596 1931—Dec. 10.54 82.5 —28.8 1 G G " 167.5 1 stn.
597 1931—Dec. 10–54 113.0 —41.7 4–5 F G " Sigma Pup.
598 1931—Dec. 10–54 127.1 −3.3 4 G G "
599 1931—Dec. 10–64 130.0 —33.0 3 G G " 125.
600 1931—Dec. 10.54 131.0 —62.0 2–4 G G "
601 1929—Dec. 12.64 117.0 —47.5 3 F M 170.5 Sigma Pup.
602 1931—Dec. 13.62 101.0 +28.5 5 G M 170.9 Geminids.
603 1931—Dec. 28–30 120.0 —21.5 5 F G

In the remarks column, D refers to Denning's General Catalogue of Meteor Radiants, the first figures to the group, the final ones to the radiant number; AMS refers to the various lists of the American Meteor Society; BAA to the Meteor Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association; numbers without letters prefixed, or in some instances with NZ, refer to the radiants of the Meteor Section of the N.Z. Astronomical Society.

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Table III.
Magnitudes of Meteors (Percentages).
Year. Obs. >1 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total.
1925–28 4.44 14.87 15.69 22.15 24.70 14.05 4.14 2321
1929 M 3.46 15.20 19.13 20.47 18.13 17.61 6.00 1500
1929 B 11.32 8.49 18.87 37.74 21.70 1.88 106
1930 M 3.85 13.76 16.12 16.72 18.93 22.34 8.28 676
1931 G 4.37 9.34 16.60 20.77 26.21 16.53 6.18 1488
1931 M 6.98 18.77 19.21 15.72 16.16 20.97 2.19 229
1931 B 6.00 20.00 6.00 36.00 30.00 2.00 50
Average 4.11 13.55 16.80 20.44 22.89 16.84 5.37 6370
  • Average magnitude of all meteors observed, 3.0.

  • Average magnitude of meteors fainter than mag. 0, 3.3.

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Table IV.
Colours of Meteors (Percentages).
Year. Obs. Red. Orange. Yellow. Green. Blue. White. Total.
1925–28 9.93 1.92 2.03 1.92 5.32 78.88 1823
1929 M 8.55 5.50 2.53 4.28 4.99 68.15 1146
1930 M 4.02 3.60 1.05 1.48 5.61 82.24 473
1931 M 1.70 3.40 2.28 2.84 5.11 84.67 176
1931 G 10.69 5.65 6.25 2.17 6.69 68.55 1151
1929–31 B 2.63 0.66 6.58 4.60 85.53 152
Average. 8.70 3.80 2.99 2.66 7.15 74.70 4921
  • Percentage of meteors coloured, 25.30.

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Table V.
Durations of Meteors (Percentages).
Year. Obs. 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 >1.0 Total.
1929–31 B 11.5 12.1 30.2 8.4 7.7 14.7 15.4 156
1931 G 2.8 13.6 11.9 16.6 15.7 13.7 8.8 6.1 2.0 3.4 5.4 1416
1925–31 M 2.2 5.6 17.7 25.5 19.7 9.0 7.8 5.3 0.3 4.8 2.1 3233
Average 2.3 8.1 15.8 22.1 18.9 10.1 8.1 5.6 0.8 4.7 3.5 4805
  • N.B.—B's observations were recorded in quarter seconds.

  • Average duration of all meteors, 0.527 secs.

  • Average duration of meteors less than 1.1 secs., 0.483 secs.

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Table VI.
Length of Flight (Percentages).
Year. Ob. 10°
1931 G 0.5 1.7 6.0 14.5 14.4 16.5 11.3 8.9 7.0 5.6 3.4
1925–31 M 0.3 0.6 2.9 5.0 7.1 8.7 8.8 8.7 6.4 6.2 5.8
All 0.4 1.0 3.9 8.2 9.5 11.3 9.6 8.7 6.6 6.0 5.0

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Year. Ob. 11° 12° 13° 14° 15° 16° 17° 18° 19° 20° >20°
1931 G 2.1 1.6 0.9 1.1 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.4 0.3 2.4
1925–31 M 5.2 5.4 3.1 2.9 3.5 2.8 2.6 2.3 1.3 1.7 8.7
All 4.2 4.1 2.4 2.3 2.5 2.0 1.9 1.6 1.0 1.2 6.6
  • Average length of flight, all meteors, 9.98°

  • Average length of flight (< 1.1 secs.), 7.97°

  • Apparent velocity, all meteors, 18.9° per second.

  • Apparent velocity, meteors < 1.lsecs., 16.4° per second.

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Table VII.
Magnitude-Duration Relation.
All Meteors. Meteors less than 1.1 secs.
Geddes. McIntosh. Geddes. McIntosh.
Mag. Dur. 140. Dur. No. Dur. No. Dur. No.
>1 0.869s 58 0.800s 93 0.488s 43 0.642s 80
1 0.596 136 0.630 339 0.497 121 0.589 327
2 0.574 238 0.515 407 0.484 216 0.495 398
3 0.529 303 0.480 441 0.486 292 0.465 436
4 0.497 386 0.467 414 0.481 380 0.461 410
5 0.438 244 0.426 445 0.428 241 0.420 444
6 0.423 92 0.412 141 0.413 91 0.412 141

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Table VIII.
Colour-Duration Relation.
All Meteors. Meteors less than 1.1 secs.
Geddes. McIntosh. Geddes. McIntosh.
Colour. Dur. No. Dur. No. Dur. No. Dur. No.
Red 0.720s 118 0.665s 115 0.592s 101 0.597s 107
Orange 0.762 62 0.498 85 0.582 51 0.461 82
Yellow 0.758 75 0.515 38 0.550 62 0.489 37
Green 0.763 24 0.665 60 0.600 20 0.623 56
Blue 0.580 76 0.713 171 0.463 68 0.613 156
White 0.488 783 0.552 1062 0.460 762 0.535 1054

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Table IX.
Remarkable Meteors.
Abnormality. Bateson. Geddes. McIntosh. Totals. Percent.
Stationary 7 9 16 0.3
Variable light 30 30 0.6
Irregular path 3 8 11 0.2
Halting motion 5 5 0.1
Curved path 1 2 6 9 0.2
Remarkable train 4 4 8 0.2
Remarkable nucleus 3 14 17 0.3
Trains > 2s. 1 18 51 70 1.4
Totals 2 37 127 166
Total meteors 156 1500 3462 5118
Per cent. abnormal 1.3 2.4 3.7 3.2

Explanation of Tables.

Table I.—Details of Observations: This table gives details of the watches performed by the various observers, and is similar in form to the first table of the preceding report. The rate actually observed per hour (col. 6) is corrected by a factor (col. 7) which attempts to make allowance for any hindrances to observing such

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as clouds or moonlight. The corrected rate (col. 8) gives the number of meteors estimated to be visible in one hour to an observer working under perfect conditions. No allowance is made for the time taken to record the observations (about half a minute per meteor in the case of the writer). The estimation of rates has not been attempted where very short watches have been made, or where the hindrance to observation was too great for any certainty to be attached to the factor.

Table II.—List of Radiants: The 399 radiants contained in this table have been determined mainly from meteors observed within four hours on one night, at least four produced paths intersecting within a circle 2° in diameter, or three meteors on one night and two on an adjacent night, intersecting as described above, or one stationary meteor, being required to form a radiant. In some cases radiants are included on weaker evidence where they fit in with a series of good radiants, or where they are confirmed by radiants in other catalogues.

In some minor points the arrangement differs from that of the first report. Following the I.A.U. recommendation, the longitude of the meteoric apex, L, is now included. The radiants, however, remain in order of date. The weights assigned to the radiants, good, fair, or poor, are shown in the column following that of the number of meteors. The full notes previously given have been reduced to a bare mention of the catalogue numbers of related radiants. The more prominent meteor showers are fully described in a separate in a separate section (page 435). Where they occur in this table, therefore, no remarks are given, but each is denoted by a proper name, on the lines adopted in Denning's General Catalogue. Another feature is the omission from this report of doubtful radiants (Table III in the previous report). These have been found in most instances to have been included on insufficient data, and their continued publication would serve no useful purpose.

Table III.—Magnitudes of Meteors: This table of the observed magnitudes of meteors reveals that the meteors increase in numbers with decrease of brightness, until the fainter magnitudes are reached, where many meteors are undoubtedly missed because of their extreme faintness.

Tables IV, V, and VI.—Colours, Durations, and Length of Flight: These tables are designed to show the average appearance and range of variation of these features in the meteors observed.

Table VII.—The Magnitude-Duration Relation: This table reveals strikingly that average duration decreases with loss of brightness. Geddes has pointed out that the curve resulting from plotting these data closely resembles one arm of a parabola.

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Table VIII.—Colour-Duration Relation: An interesting table in the first report of the American Meteor Society (Trans. Amer. Phil. Soc., 22, pt. i) prompted the formation of a similar table from the data available. While supporting Dr. Olivier's figures of the low average duration of yellow and orange meteors and the high average shown by blue and green meteors, the present table does not confirm his contention that the white meteors have the longest duration of all. The difference has probably arisen from the fact that where he used only meteors actually classed as white by the observer, in the present table any meteor not assigned a colour and brighter than the fifth magnitude (i.e., in which colour should have been seen if it were present) has been regarded as white.

In the preceding statistical tables a distinction has been drawn wherever possible between normal and abnormal meteors, the view being taken that any meteor with a duration greater than 1 sec. is not normal. This distinction has generally resulted in smoothing out irregularities in the data.

Table IX.—Remarkable Meteors: It may come as a surprise to the uninitiated that only three meteors in a hundred present any marked abnormality. In the table the various types of abnormality are shown.

Fireballs.

During the period covered by the report six bright fireballs, four of which were of the detonating variety, have been subjected to special study. The results have been published separately as follows:

  • Fireball of 1929, September 5, in Journ. B.A.A., 40, p. 79.

  • Fireball of 1929, October 7, in Journ. B.A.A., 40, p. 301.

  • Fireballs of 1930, June 13 and 18, in Journ. B.A.A., 41, p. 73.

  • Fireballs of 1930, July 30, and 1931, February 19, in Journ. B.A.A., 42, p. 174.

In the course of collecting fireball observations through the New Zealand press and in other ways, a number of isolated reports of bright objects have been received. Special acknowledgment must be made of the assistance rendered by the following persons:—Mrs M. E. Allen, Eketahuna, press clippings; Mrs R. A. McIntosh, Auckland, apparent paths; J. W. Alexandre, Auckland, two daylight fireballs and several other objects; A. C. Gifford, Silverstream, observations; Dr. C. E. Adams and I. L. Thomsen, Dominion Observatory, for making available observations of fireballs forwarded to the observatory.

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Although it has been impossible to determine real paths for these objects, they have a definite value in determining rates of frequency and times of apparition. It has been found, for instance, that the monthly frequency reaches a marked maximum in June, the scanty data thus revealing a similarity to the curve of meteor rates, whereas in the northern hemisphere the curves are opposed.

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Monthly Frequency.
Month. Number. Month. Number. Month. Number.
January 1 May 2 September 6
February 4 June 14 October 3
March 2 July 9 November 3
April 5 August 5 December 0

A study of the distribution of these fireballs in time shows a marked maximum in the evening hours and a scarcity after midnight, already well established in the data compiled in the northern hemisphere. Two daylight fireballs are not included in the table.

Distribution in Time.
Hour. 17–18 18–19 19–20 20–21 21–22 22–23 23–24
No. 2 7 1 8 11 11 4
Hour. 0–1 1–2 2–3 3–4 4–5 5–6
No. 2 1 1 0 2 1

Conclusion.

Further statistical data, notably on trains and telescopic meteors, are being tabulated from the observations now in hand, but treatment of these data is withheld at present owing to the scanty material available for discussion.

In conclusion the Director would appeal to members of the New Zealand Astronomical Society to endeavour to contribute to the work being undertaken by the Meteor Section. If disinclined to actively observe meteors, there are many other ways in which assistance can be rendered. Variable-star observers and comet seekers can materially assist by recording all telescopic meteors seen. Possessors of moderate telescopes can spend a few hours at the time of rich annual showers sweeping radiant areas in a search for telescopic meteors. Any member, with little trouble to himself, can forward details of bright fireballs or initiate press campaigns for the collection of observations of such objects.

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Those members of the Society not possessing telescopes, but anxious to do some research, are invited to write to the Director with a view to taking up the study of meteors, and thereby helping to maintain the section's output of observations. Every assistance will be willingly given to inexperienced observers who desire to contribute to the work being performed.

R. A. McIntosh

, F.R.A.S., Director.
Private Observatory,
23 Hollywood Avenue, Epsom, Auckland,
June 7, 1932.