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Volume 64, 1935
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Annual Meeting, 16th May, 1934.

Minutes.

The annual meeting of the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand was held on Wednesday, 16th May, 1934, in the Council Room, Victoria University College, Wellington. Professor R. Speight, President, occupied the chair.

Present.—Representing the Government: Mr B. C. Aston, Mr M. A. Eliott, Dr E. Marsden, Mr W. R. B. Oliver; representing the Auckland Institute: Mr A. T. Pycroft, Professor H. W. Segar; representing the Wellington Philosophical Society: Dr E. Kidson, Professor H. B. Kirk; representing the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury: Dr C. C. Farr, Professor R. Speight; representing the Otago Institute: Dr F. J. Turner; representing the Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute: Mr G. V. Hudson; co-opted member: Dr P. Marshall.

Apologies.—Apologies for absence were received from Professor James Park (Otago) and from Professor T. H. Easterfield (Nelson). Professor Park wrote stating that there was serious illness in his family, and Professor Easterfield wrote that he was suffering from influenza.

Honorary Patron.—A message written for the occasion of the inauguration of the Royal Society of New Zealand by His Excellency the Governor-General, who regretted his inability to be present at the meeting, was read by the President. On the motion of Dr Farr, seconded by Professor Segar, it was resolved that His Excellency be thanked for his inspiring message. On the motion of Dr Marshall, seconded by Dr Marsden, it was resolved that the message be printed in the Transactions. It was further moved by Dr Farr, seconded by Professor Segar, and carried, that the message be read at the commencement of the conversazione to be held that evening.

Tribute to Deceased Members.—The President referred to the deaths of several members who had passed away during the past year, namely, Mr G. M. Thomson, Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville, Sir Thomas Sidey, Mr Henry Hill, Sir Arthur Dudley Dobson, Mr J. P. Maxwell, Mr A. Dillon Bell, Sir Edward Mitchelson, Mr H. B. Matthews, Mr J. J. Bishop, Mr George Gray, and a past member of the Wellington Philosophical Society, Dr J. Mackintosh Bell. Also to the following honorary members: Professor W. Morris Davis and Professor J. W. Gregory. He asked the members of the Council to stand in respect to their memory.

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The Late Mr G. M. Thomson.—On the motion of Professor Kirk, seconded by Dr Farr, the followin resolution was carried in silence:

“That the Royal Society of New Zealand place on record, its sense of the great loss that has befallen this land through the death of Mr G. M. Thomson, who was, through a long life, an able, enthusiastic, and devoted worker in the field of science, an earnest and untiring public citizen, a courteous and upright gentleman, and that with the members of his family it express heartfelt sympathy.”

The Late Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville.—On the motion of Dr Marsden, seconded by Dr Kidson, the following resolution was carried in silence:—

“That the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand places on record its deep sense of the loss incurred through the death of the late Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville, and desires to record its appreciation of the distinguished position he attained by his researches in Mathematics, his influence as a Professor at Victoria University College, his unselfish and efficient service to the Institute as Librarian and Editor, and the example of his high moral character and modest disposition. I therefore move that an obituary notice be recorded in the Proceedings of the Transactions, and that the resolution, with the Council's condolences, be transmitted to Mrs Sommerville.”

Notices of Motion were then taken, and were dealt with later in the meeting.

Hector Award.—A statement was received from Dr Evans, convener of the Hector Award Committee, pointing out that the Committee was not yet in a position to give its recommendation. He referred to the death of Professor Sommerville, a member of the Award Committee, and stated that the vacancy thus caused had been filled by the appointment of Professor Carslaw, of Sydney. Dr Farr also outlined the action taken by the Committee. On the motion of Dr Marshall, seconded by Dr Farr, it was resolved that the Standing Committee be authorised to act when the Hector Award Committee's recommendation is received.

Amount of Hector Award.—On the motion of Mr Eliott, seconded by Mr Aston, it was resolved that the amount of the Hector Award for 1934 be £60.

Hamilton Award.—Dr Marshall moved the adoption of the Hamilton Award Committee's report, which is as follows:—

“After careful consideration, we have decided to recommend that the Hamilton Prize be awarded to Mr L. C. King, M.Sc. Both of those who sent in papers have done a considerable amount of original work, and it happens that both have devoted themselves mainly to the study of palaeontology of local developments of tertiary rocks. Both have also done geological work in other fields. We consider that in such work

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Mr King has shown more originality and he has travelled long distances and has thus made his observations of great comparative value. His papers are written in an attractive style.

(Signed) P. Marshall, Chairman.”


14th May, 1934.

This was seconded by Mr Hudson and carried unanimously.

Amount of Hamilton Award.—On the motion of Mr Eliott, seconded by Mr Pycroft, it was resolved that the amount of the Hamilton Prize be £5.

Honorary Members.—The election of four honorary members was held, and resulted in the election of Mr E. C. Andrews, Dr P. Buck (Te Rangi Hiroa), Professor A. H. Compton, Professor J. B. Gatenby.

Declaration of Vacancies in Honorary Members' List.—The death of Professor W. Morris Davis was announced.

Declaration of Vacancies in Fellowship.—Two vacancies, caused by the death of Mr G. M. Thomson and of Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville, were declared.

Number of Fellows to be Elected in 1935.—On the motion of Dr Marsden, seconded by Professor Segar, it was resolved that two Fellows be elected in 1935.

Title of Fellows.—On the motion of Dr Farr, seconded by Mr Pycroft, it was resolved that in future the title of Fellows be F.R.S.N.Z.

On the motion of Dr Marsden, seconded by Professor Segar, it was resolved that all present Fellows of the New Zealand Institute be deemed Fellows of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Member Bodies' Reports and Balance Sheets.—The following reports and balance sheets were laid on the table:—

Auckland Institute, for the year ending 31st March, 1933.

Otago Institute, for the year ending 31st October, 1933.

Wellington Philosophical Society, for the year ending 30th September, 1933.

Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, for the year ending 31st October, 1933.

Nelson Philosophical Society, for the year ending 30th September, 1933.

Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute, for the year ending 31st December, 1933.

Professor Segar mentioned that he had a proof copy of the 1934 Report of the Auckland Institute.

The reports were received and were referred to the Hon. Treasurer for report.

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Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute.—It was reported that at the last meeting of the Standing Committee a telegram had been received from the Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute asking permission to change its title to the Royal Society of New Zealand (Hawke's Bay branch), and to make use of the Society's badge. The Standing Committee had given the desired permission in regard to the change of title, and had informed the Hawke's Bay Institute that there was no objection to its using the Society's badge provided the words “Hawke's Bay Branch” were printed with the badge.

On the motion of Mr Hudson, seconded by Mr Oliver, it was resolved that the action of the Standing Committee be confirmed.

On the motion of Dr Kidson, seconded by Mr Eliott, it was resolved: “That the actual procedure in regard to the change of title of member bodies be referred to the Regulations Committee.”

Report of the Standing Committee for the Year Ending 31st March, 1934.

Meetings.—During the year five meetings of the Standing Committee were held, also a special meeting called to consider the Sidey Summer-time Award, the following being the record of attendance:—Mr B. C. Aston, Wellington, 6; Professor T. H. Easterfield, Nelson, 2; Mr M. A. Eliott, Palmerston North, 2; Dr C. C. Farr, Christchurch, 3; Mr G. V. Hudson, Wellington, 6; Dr E. Kidson, Wellington, 6; Professor H. B. Kirk, Wellington, 6; Dr E. Marsden, Wellington, 3; Dr P. Marshall, Wellington, 6; Mr W. R. B. Oliver, Wellington, 6; Mr A. T. Pycroft, Auckland, 2; Professor H. W. Segar, Auckland, 3; Professor R. Speight, Christchurch, 3; Dr F. J. Turner, Dunedin, 2.

Title.—On the 25th May, 1933, advice was received from His Excellency the Governor-General that His Majesty the King had approved of the Institute's title being changed to the Royal Society of New Zealand.

At first it was considered that this would necessitate merely an amending clause in the old Act, but the Crown Law Office intimated that an amending clause was impracticable, and that the time was opportune for the drafting of a new Act giving authority for the change of title and consolidating the old Act and amendments. The new Act, as drawn up, contains no new substantive provisions, the only alterations being of a machinery nature. Before it reached Parliament, a copy of the Bill was submitted to each member of the Council for his consideration, and all suggestions regarding it were carefully considered, and in some cases were adopted.

The Act was passed during the latter part of the last session of Parliament, and became effective on the 6th December, 1933.

To announce the change of title, a brief history of the New Zealand Institute from the time of its inception to the present was written up, and was issued to the press throughout New Zealand.

Regulations.—A sub-committee was set up to revise the regulations and to undertake any necessary action in connection with the change of title.

As this change necessitates an alteration in the wording on the various medals, it was considered advisable to add Professor Shelley's name to the subcommittee, and this was done at the last meeting of the Standing Committee on the 10th April, 1934.

At that same meeting the Standing Committee referred to the annual meeting the following proposed regulation which had been drafted by the Crown Law Drafting Office:—

“A member of the Council or any Committee shall not vote or take part in the discussion of any matter before the Council or Committee in which he has directly or indirectly any pecuniary interest.”

The Wellington Philosophical Society forwarded the following resolutions, which were referred to the annual meeting by the sub-committee:—

(1) “The number of Government appointees be reduced from four to two.

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(2) “Any endowment money up to the amount at present received by the Institute from the Government for general expenses be definitely set apart for the publication of reports of scientific work as done at present through the Transactions.”

Annual Meeting, 1934.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 10th April, 1934, a letter was received from the Secretary of the Wellington Philosophical Society as follows:—

“… The Council of the Wellington Philosophical Society is desirous of marking the occasion of the first annual meeting of the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand in some special way. It is suggested that this meeting extend over two days, and that the Wellington Philosophical Society act as host to the Council during such period as the Council is not engaged on the official business of the Royal Society. The proposals include the holding of a conversazione on the evening of the first day, a morning or afternoon session devoted to addresses and discussions of scientific interest, and perhaps visits to certain places in the immediate vicinity of Wellington.…”

Mr Callaghan attended the meeting and gave a more detailed account of what was proposed. It was suggested that possibly His Excellency the Governor-General might attend and deliver the inaugural address.

A sub-committee was set up to meet the representatives of the Wellington Philosophical Society, when the President's sanction to the proposals had been received. The sub-committee subsequently met, and it was intimated that His Excellency the Governor-General regretted his inability to attend the meetings owing to prior engagements in the Auckland district. It was decided that the business meeting should be held on the first day, the presidential address be given at the evening meeting, and other matters were left in the hands of the Council of the Wellington Philosophical Society. The Chairman expressed the appreciation of the Standing Committee at the action of the Wellington Philosophical Society, and thanked the Council for its kind invitation.

Council.—On the 25th August, the Institute suffered a very severe loss in the death of Mr G. M. Thomson. Mr Thomson had been a member of the Board of Governors since 1903, and his keen interest in the Institute and his valuable work as a member of the Board are an irreparable loss to the Society. To fill the vacancy thus occasioned, the Otago Institute elected Dr F. J. Turner, Lecturer in Geology at the University of Otago.

At the special meeting of the Board held on the 7th December, the President, Professor Speight, welcomed Dr Turner to the Board.

Mr Henry Hill.—News of the death of Mr Henry Hill, who was for some years a member of the Board of Governors, was also received with regret, and at a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 23rd August the following resolution was passed: “That the Institute place on record its deep appreciation of the services rendered to the Institute and to science by the late Mr Henry Hill and its sense of the loss sustained by his death.”

Finances.—The inadequacy of the annual grant of £500 has been commented upon on several occasions, and has been reflected during the year in the inability to publish certain papers of unusual length which were submitted by the authors for publication in the Transactions. The necessity for keeping down the cost of each part of the volume has prohibited the Standing Committee from even considering these papers, despite the fact that their inclusion might have enhanced the value of the Transactions.

An amount of £62, which had accumulated from unused or refunded research grants balances, was transferred by special sanction of Parliament to the Publications Fund, and is being used to cover the cost of publishing the results of researches undertaken with the aid of a grant.

The Finance Committee has met prior to meetings of the Publications Committee, and has stipulated what amount shall be spent on the various parts.

Publications.—The remaining three parts of Volume 63 were published, and Part 1 of Volume 64 is in the press. A good deal of delay occurred in the printing of the final parts of Volume 63, and much of this could have been avoided if certain authors had realised the necessity of promptitude in returning corrected proofs to the Hon. Editor. Those members who had ordered bound

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copies of the volume in preference to the quarterly parts were justified in complaining of the delay in the receipt of their copies, but it is expected that there will be no further cause for complaint in this direction.

Parts 1, 2, and 3 of Volume 63 were laid on the tables of the Houses of Parliament on the 13th October, 1933, and Part 4 will be presented as soon as the Houses resume.

Hon. Editor.—It was with the greatest regret that it was learned on the 1st February, 1934, of the death of Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville, who had been Honorary Editor of the Transactions since the beginning of 1929.

Although Professor Sommerville had been in indifferent health, and on that account a few months previously had resigned the Honorary Editorship, his death came with tragic suddenness, as it was only the day previously that he had been in the Secretary's office discussing matters relevant to the Library and to the proposed supplementary edition of the Reference List of Scientific Periodicals.

In view of Professor Sommerville's resignation as Honorary Editor, at the special meeting held on the 7th December, Dr P. Marshall was appointed to the office, with Dr F. J. Turner, of Dunedin, as Associate Editor.

Reference List of Scientific Periodicals.—It is generally recognised that the Reference List edited by Mr Archey and published by the New Zealand Institute in 1927 is a most useful publication, but there is urgent need that it should be brought up to date. The Secretary has taken the preliminary steps for the compilation of a new edition, and it is hoped that the work will be completed during the coming year.

Index Trans. N.Z. Inst.—A. decennial index to the Transactions is long overdue, as the last one published was for volumes 41–51. At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 7th December, the Vice-president reported that with the assistance of Major R. A. Wilson, steps had been taken for the preparation of an index of volumes 52–63. The Society is deeply indebted to Major Wilson for once again assisting in this direction. The index will be carefully scrutinised and checked before its publication.

Sales.—During the year no complete sets of the Transactions were disposed of, but, nevertheless, by the sale of odd volumes and bulletins and indexes the sum of £23 Os 10d has been added to the Endowment Fund.

Exchange List.—On the recommendation of the Library Committee, the following were added to the Exchange List:—

  • University of Western Australia.

  • Belfast Naturalists' Field Club.

  • University of North Carolina.

  • La Plata Museum, Argentina.

  • University of Tartu, Dorpat.

  • Budapest University Botanical Gardens.

Lrbrary.—On the recommendation of the Library Committee it was decided to proceed with binding as far as the amount in the Library Fund permitted, consequently certain sets have been prepared for binding. Unfortunately, however, the binder has been unable to procure the same buckram as he had previously used, and the ordering of new supplies has occasioned considerable delay.

A partial set of the Transactions was donated by Mr R. F. Blair, and Mr Aston has kindly presented certain volumes of the old reports of the Agricultural Department. The thanks of the Society are accorded to these gentlemen for their action.

The Library is being used extensively by the staff and advanced students of Victoria University College, and is much appreciated by them. The Library greatly misses the willing service and advice of its Honorary Librarian, the late Professor Sommerville.

It was intimated through the press that a representative of the Carnegie Corporation of New York intended making a survey of the public and other libraries in New Zealand. The Carnegie Corporation was written to and asked that its representative should include the Society's Library in his survey, and some of the most pressing needs of the Library were pointed out.

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Member Bodies.—The following reports and balance sheets have been received:—

Auckland Institute, for the year ending 31st March, 1933.

Otago Institute, for the year ending 31st October, 1933.

Wellington Philosophical Society for the year ending 30th September, 1933.

Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, for the year ending 31st October, 1933.

Nelson Philosophical Society, for the year ending 30th September, 1933.

Hawke's Bay Philosophical Institute for the year ending 31st December, 1933.

Fellowship.—On the 3rd August, 1933, Dr H. G. Denham was gazetted a Fellow of the New Zealand Institute.

At the last annual meeting the number of Fellows had reached forty, the limit laid down in the Regulations, consequently there will be no election at the 1934 meeting. At that meeting, however, it will be necessary to declare two vacancies owing to the death of Mr G. M. Thomson and of Professor D. M. Y. Sommerville.

Honorary Members.—Four vacancies in the list of honorary members were declared at the last annual meeting. For these vacancies eleven nominations have been received from the member bodies for election at the annual meeting.

Hector Award.—Last year two awards for the Hector Medal and Prize were made. At a meeting of the Wellington Philosophical Society on the 23rd August, the President, Professor Speight, presented the Hector Medal and Prize to Dr J. Marwick, while at a function in the Otago Institute the Chancellor of the University of Otago presented Dr W. N. Benson with a similar medal and prize.

At the last meeting of the Standing Committee it was decided to ask Dr Carslaw, of Sydney University, to act on the Hector Award Committee for 1934 in place of the late Professor Sommerville. Dr Carslaw has signified that he will be pleased to act on this committee.

A recommendation: “That the various award committees, in making their reports, should set out briefly the grounds on which their recommendation is made” was received from the Wellington Philosophical Society and adopted at a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 23rd August.

T. K. Sidey Summer-time Award.—A few days after the last annual meeting news was received with great regret of the death of Sir Thomas Sidey, founder of the Summer-time award.

At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 23rd August several letters of protest in regard to the Sidey Summer-time award made at the last annual meeting were received and subsequently were circulated to members of the Council for consideration.

As the outcome of later developments, a special meeting of the Board was called on the 7th December to receive a unanimous report from the Summertime Award Committee. That report recommended that a special prize be given to Mr Hudson and the first Summer-time award be given to Lord Rutherford, in view of the fact that Lady Sidey had given an assurance that she would provide two prizes, and that Mr G. V. Hudson would relinquish his claim to the award made at last annual meeting. After some discussion, it was resolved:

(1) That a special Sidey Medal and prize of £100 be awarded to Mr Hudson in recognition of his pioneer work in daylight saving.

(2) That the first Sidey Summer-time Medal and prize be awarded to Lord Rutherford.

Subsequently a cheque for £200 was received from Lady Sidey, and Lord Rutherford signified his pleasure in accepting the first Sidey Summer-time award.

The Institute expressed its heartiest appreciation of Lady Sidey's action in providing a special prize as well as the amount of the first award.

Carter Bequest.—At last annual meeting the report presented by the Carter Observatory Committee was referred back to the Standing Committee with authority, if it were considered advisable, to continue negotiations with the City Council for the purchase of the City telescope or some other, and to take such steps as it may think desirable to establish a Carter Observatory on lines such as those indicated in the report of the Committee.

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At a well-attended meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 23rd August a lengthy discussion on the proposals submitted in the report took place. At that meeting also a deputation from the Astronomical Section of the Wellington Philosophical Society urged the carrying out of the proposals. Many arguments for and against the proposals were brought forward, and opinions regarding the proposed site were far from unanimous.

Finally it was resolved: “That the Standing Committee take immediate steps to ascertain whether the words of the Carter Will, ‘in or near Wellington,’ may be altéred to allow of the erection of the observatory outside these limits, and the method and cost of making the Will effective in that direction.”’

A legal opinion has been received, and will be submitted to the annual meeting.

Hutton Grants.—Four applications for grants from the Hutton Fund were considered at a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 10th April, 1934. Mr L. C. King applied for £25 for geological research in the Marlborough district. Messrs R. A. Falla and A. W. B. Powell applied for £50 for research on the molluscan and bird fauna of the Sub-Antarctic Islands of New Zealand. Dr C. C. Caldenius, of Stockholm, applied for a grant to assist in the investigation of varves in New Zealand. Mr W. R. B. Oliver applied for £75-£90 to assist him in publishing a Monograph on the Genus Coprosma.

The Standing Committee recommended to the annual meeting that Mr King be granted £25; Messrs Falla and Powell, £40; Mr Oliver, £50.

It was further recommended that at the 1935 annual meeting, Dr Marshall, whose application was too late for consideration by the 1934 meeting, be granted £25 for apparatus for measuring microscopic crystals.

Permanent Records.—The work of establishing a permanent record of those who have been prominent members at some period during the sixty-seven years of the Institute's existence is progressing, and with the co-operation of the Dominion Museum it is hoped to procure as many photographs of these as is possible.

Earthquake-proof Building Construction.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 23rd August, the President, Professor Speight, stated that he considered the Institute should take a lead in urging upon the Government the necessity of introducing legislation to revise the building regulations with a view to minimising earthquake and fire risk. A sub-committee consisting of Dr Kidson (convener), Dr P. Marshall, Dr M. A. F. Barnett, and Mr F. W. Furkert was set up to bring the matter before the Government.

Subsequently a deputation headed by the President, Professor Speight, and comprising members of the Institute, civil engineers, architects, and builders and contractors, waited upon the Prime Minister and urged that the Building Construction Bill should be proceeded with. Mr Forbes gave an assurance that the Bill would be placed before Parliament.

Later, however, it was learned that instead of proceeding with the Bill, Cabinet decided to proceed along the lines of existing legislation which empowers the Government to draft model by-laws, etc., which will become part of the by-laws of all municipal authorities concerned. Dr Kidson has reported that, on learning of this, Professor Speight wrote to the Prime Minister expressing the concern of the New Zealand Institute at this, and pointing out that it was because of the inadequacy of the suggested measures and the existing machinery that the deputation had waited on him on the 5th October. The Prime Minister replied on the 12th December that he appreciated the anxiety that there should be a minimum standard of structural strength in connection with buildings in areas liable to earthquake, but that after careful consideration it had been decided to proceed along the above lines. He wrote: “… You will appreciate that these proposals are a definite step in the direction of more adequate protection against earthquake, and it is regretted that the more complete and involved arrangements contemplated by the Building Construction Bill cannot at present be given effect to owing to considerable opposition brought forward.”

The Committee is considering what action might be taken to induce the Government to reverse its decision, and it is anticipated that definite proposals will be brought before the annual meeting for consideration.

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Wild Life Control.—In August the New Zealand Forestry League wrote asking the Institute to support it in a request to the Commissioner of State Forests to set up a Royal Commission to inquire into the destruction of forests by plant-eating animals. The Native Bird Protection Society wrote on the same subject, but expressed the view that there was no need to incur expense in the setting up of a Commission, as there was abundant evidence of the destruction caused by these animals. It considered that the only remedy was extermination, but in the event of a Royal Commission being set up, the whole question of wild life control should be the subject considered, and that the Commission should consist of five, not three experts as suggested by the Forestry League.

The Standing Committee considered these letters, and approved of the suggestion that a Royal Commission should be set up in order that the whole subject of wild life control should be investigated.

The Nelson Philosophical Society has also asked the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand to consider the advisability of making strong recommendations to the Government to the effect:—

(1) That the menace to our native forests from reckless burning, and to a much greater extent from the destruction caused by deer and other animals, is much more serious than is as yet realised by the general public.

(2) That the results of the wholesale destruction of our forests now taking place will, if it is allowed to continue, constitute a national calamity of the first magnitude at no distant date. The choking up of our river-beds and the ruination of our plains as the result of the denudation of our mountains is already raising serious problems in the Nelson and other districts.

(3) That much more drastic steps should be taken to deal with this menace than have been adopted up to the present.

(4) That no native forests should be allowed to be destroyed until experts have examined the ground and have certified that the land is suitable for agricultural, pastoral, mining, or similar purposes, and that it is not contrary to the national interest for the forest to be cleared.

(5) That large areas of Provincial State Forests could, and should now, be declared permanent State forests.

At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 10th April the matter was referred to the annual meeting for consideration.

Kemadeo and Auckland Islands.—Advice was received on the 6th April from the Lands and Survey Department that the pastoral license held by Messrs Moffatt Bros. had recently expired, and the opportunity was taken by the Department of reserving Auckland, Rose, Disappointment, Enderby, and Ewing Islands for the preservation of native flora and fauna. As Adams Island was reserved in 1910, the whole of the Auckland group is now under reservation. The Kermadec Islands, with the exception of a small freehold area on Sunday Island, have also been reserved for the same purpose.

The Standing Committee expressed its appreciation of the action of the Government.

Portobello Marine Fish Hatchery.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 7th December, Professor Kirk drew attention to the fact that the Government grant to the Portobello Fish Hatchery had been so reduced that it was not possible for it to employ a biologist. It was resolved that representation be made to the Government pointing out the necessity, at the first opportunity, of making provision for the appointment of a trained biologist.

The Minister of Marine replied that the views of the Institute have been noted, and they will be useful when the position of the Fish Hatchery is being reconsidered next year.

Pacific Science Congress.—The general secretary of the Fifth Pacific Science Congress wrote forwarding a copy of a minute of the final meeting of the Congress as follows: “Whereas no invitation has been received by the Pacific Science Association for the Sixth Congress, and whereas it is expedient to maintain an active committee in charge in order to find a place for the next meeting. and to give assurance that the work of the Pacific Science Association will

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not be neglected in the interim, it is resolved that this final meeting of the Pacific Science Council in Vancouver, B.C., Canada, approve the appointment of a general Hold-over Committee under the present chairman, Dr H. M. Tory, for this purpose, and that the Committee be comprised of one representative from each of the countries that have taken an active interest in the work of the Pacific Science Association, including not only those which are members of the Pacific Science Council, but also Hong Kong, Fiji, Straits Settlement, and Federated Malay States, Mexico, and Siam, and that the Committee be given power to add to its numbers.”

It was decided to ask Professor Speight to sit on this Committee.

Australian and New Zealand Assoc. Adv. Science.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 10th April, 1934, it was resolved to ask the Auckland Institute what preliminary steps had been taken in regard to the 1937 meeting of the Association, which is to be held in Auckland.

Overseas Meeting and Celebrations.—Dr J. G. Myers and Mr E. Meyrick both wrote regretting their inability to attend the celebrations in connection with the Entomological Society of London. Dr Myers explained that his work was keeping him in South America.

Dr J. Mackintosh Bell, who represented the Institute at the Geological Congress in Washington last year, wrote on the 30th October that the Congress was a very interesting one, and a wide field of geological subjects was covered in the papers and discussions, and although none of the papers dealt directly with New Zealand, one or two references were made as regards outstanding features there.

News of the death of Dr Bell on the 31st March was received with great regret.

An invitation to the International Geological Congress in Warsaw was received, and Dr Benson was asked to represent the Institute if he found it possible to attend. An invitation to the 150th anniversary of the Asiatic Society of Bengal was received too late for action.

Institute of France.—An application was received from the Institute of France for an exchange of medals. It was decided to accede to this request, and specimens of the Society's three medals were forwarded.

A letter appreciating the action of the Society and advising that four medals were being forwarded in exchange has been received, but the medals have not yet come to hand.

Accommodation in New Museum Building.—Although it is an understood thing that the Society's Library and office will be housed in the new buildings, the National Art Gallery and Dominion Museum Act makes no provision for this, and it was considered that a definite agreement regarding the Society's tenure should be arranged. It was decided that Professor Kirk, Dr Marshall, and Mr Aston should go into the matter with the Board of Trustees and make some suitable terms.

The Late Mr G. M. Thomson's Work on Crustacea.—The question of the publication of this work was discussed, and it was resolved that the matter be left in the hands of Mr Oliver, the President, and Mr Archey for consideration and report.

Roll-call, Annual Meetings.—At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 28th June, the following resolution was carried:—

“That at future meetings of the Board of Governors there be a roll-call in the afternoon as well as in the morning.”

The report of the Standing Committee was considered clause by clause, and on the motion of Professor Speight, seconded by Mr Pycroft, was adopted.

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New Regulation.—On the motion of Mr Elliott, seconded by Professor Kirk, is was resolved that the following proposed clause drafted by the Law Drafting Office be adopted:—

“A member of the Council or any Committee shall not vote or take part in the discussion of any matter before the Council or Committee in which he has directly or indirectly any pecuniary interest.”

Medals and Seal.—It was reported that at the last meeting of the Standing Committee a report had been received from Professor Shelley in regard to the proposed alteration of the Society's medals made necessary by the change of title, and the Standing Committee recommended to the annual meeting that Professor Shelley's report and sketch be submitted to Mr A. G. Wyon, maker of two of the original dies, for his approval or comment. On the motion of Professor Kirk, seconded by Dr Farr, it was resolved: “That Professor Shelley be thanked for his report, and that the recommendation of the Standing Committee be approved.”

In regard to the Society's seal, it was reported that the Standing Committee had asked the Regulations Committee “to examine the seal of the Royal Society of London and other similar societies with the object of arriving at the requisites for inclusion in a seal for the Royal Society of New Zealand, introducing some feature distinctive of New Zealand.” The action of the Standing Committee was confirmed.

Proposals by Member Bodies.—Dr Farr asked that opportunity be given to the meeting to consider the proposals submitted by the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury. It was stated that the proposals referred to had been sent by the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury to the Wellington Philosophical Society in reply to the latter's circular. No official communication had been received from the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury, merely a copy of the letter to the Wellington Philosophical Society. Dr Farr stated that the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury had desired to have the Act amended, and had not been given the opportunity when the new Act was drawn up. Mr Aston explained that copies of the Bill had been circulated to members of the Council for suggestions, but the Bill was confidential until it came before the House, and it could not be discussed publicly.

Dr Marsden further explained that the new Act had been purely of a machinery nature and that it would have been impracticable to introduce new matter.

A letter from the Wellington Philosophical Society, dated 26th October, 1933, embodying two proposals, was read. After some discussion, on the motion of Professor Kirk, seconded by Mr Oliver, it was resolved to refer the letter to the Standing Committee for report. On the motion of Mr Pycroft, it was resolved that the Standing Committee should approach member bodies for information regarding suggested amendments.

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Wild Life Control.—In connection with the question of wild life control and the setting up of a Royal Commission to consider the subject, it was resolved, on the motion of Dr Kidson, seconded by Mr Pycroft, that a committee consisting of the President, the Vice-president, Professor Kirk, Dr Marsden, Mr Oliver, Mr E. F. Stead, and Mr R. A. Falla be set up to co-operate with other interested societies and report to the Standing Committee. The committee to have power to co-opt other members, and the Standing Committee to have power to take action.

Mr Pycroft mentioned that the Auckland Institute would support any action in the extermination of opossums as well as of deer.

Mr G. M. Thomson's Work on Crustacea.—Mr Oliver, convener of the sub-committee set up to consider the completion of the late Mr Thomson's work on the Crustacea, reported that it was considered that some qualified person should continue the work, but that at the present time no one qualified was available. Miss Margaret Thomson proposes to spend a year in England, part of the time studying crustacea under Dr Calman at the British Museum, and she hopes then to have sufficient qualifications and to be in a position to finish the book on New Zealand Crustacea. In the circumstances, the committee recommends that no action be taken by the Royal Society of New Zealand at present. Mr Oliver moved the adoption of this report, which was seconded by Professor Kirk and carried.

Earthquake Building Construction.—Dr Kidson, convener of the sub-committee set up to urge the Government to introduce a Building Construction Bill last session of Parliament, reported that further action had been taken by the committee, and he produced a statement and a circular which the committee proposed to circulate to all members of the House and to other interested persons. He moved that the President, Professor Speight, sign this statement, and that the sub-committee be given authority to circulate it. Dr Kidson read the circular, but the statement was a lengthy one, and, on the motion of Dr Farr, it was resolved that the matter be postponed until the afternoon session in order that members might have an opportunity to read the statement.