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Volume 66, 1937
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– 60 –

Observation of Meteors for the Years 1932–34 in New Zealand

[Read before the Wellington Philosophical Society, September 25th, 1935; received by the Editor, September 2, 1935; issued separately, June, 1936.]

This report, covering the work performed in the three years 1932–34, is the third published by the Meteor Section of the New Zealand Astronomical Society, Inc., the earlier reports appearing in Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, vol. 60, p. 448 (1927–28) and vol. 63, p. 443 (1929–31), and reprinted as Bulletins 5 and 21 of the New Zealand Astronomical Society, Inc. The present paper is on the same general lines as the preceding reports, to the explanatory portions of which reference should be made.

Practically no meteoric research has been undertaken in the Southern Hemisphere beyond the work done in this country. The section therefore has had an unexplored field in which to work, and the primary objectives necessarily have been to determine the various centres of meteoric radiation south of the celestial equator and to ascertain the rate of meteoric activity and its variation. At the same time no opportunity has been neglected to carry on special studies as far as the limited personnel would permit. While handicapped by little foreknowledge of rates and radiants, the section has benefited from the experience of contemporary bodies in the Northern Hemisphere, and has been able to avoid some of the pitfalls which have retarded northern meteor observers.

The following table summarises the work performed by the various observers during the period covered by the report:—

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

1932. 1933. 1934. Total.
Observer. Symbol. h. m. Mets. h. m. Mets h. m. Mets. h. m. Mets.
Bateson, F. (Ba) 13 15 168 1 35 32 14 50 200
Butterton, M. (Bu) 36 56 503 5 21 40 42 17 543
Geddes, M. (G) 65 52 1131 35 13 726 12 6 266 113 11 2123
McIntosh, R. (Mc) 36 50 642 8 2 175 14 24 209 59 16 1026
*Alchin, R. (Al) 2 30 5 5 15 32 7 45 37
*Bryce, A. (By) 1 25 9 4 40 24 6 5 33
*Morshead, F (Mo) 8 45 0 8 45 0
—— —— —— —— —— —— —— ——
Totals 165 33 2458 60 10 1029 26 30 475 252 9 3962

Observers assisting only on special occasions.

The low totals for 1934 were occasioned mainly by unfavourable weather.

It will be seen from the above table that an average of 15 meteors an hour was observed under all types of observing conditions.

[Footnote] * Observers assisting only on special occasions. The low totals for 1934 were occasioned mainly by unfavourable weather.

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Reports of 55 telescopic meteors also were received from members of the New Zealand Astronomical Society during the three years as follows:—

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

1932 1933 1934 Total.
Bateson. F. 6 6
Butterton, M. 2 2
Bryce, A. 2 2 4
Geddes, M. 9 5 14
McIntosh, R. 1 1
Morshead, F 3 4 6 13
Thomsen, I. 1 2 0 3
Smith, G. 0 3 8 11
Wilkinson, D. 1 1
Total 8 26 21 55

The services of various persons not members of the Meteor Section who volunteered for special campaigns are acknowledged as follows:—Auckland: L. D. Neil (1932 Leonids), Mrs R. A. McIntosh (1932 Leonids and Peltier-Whipple meteors). Hamilton: A. Bryce and R. Alchin, assisted by various members of the Hamilton Astronomical Society (1932 Leonids, 1933 Aquarids, Byrd Expedition observations, 1934). New Plymouth: F. J. Morshead (Leonids, Byrd), D. Wilkinson (Leonids, Byrd), Dr Home (Leonids). Eltham: F. Gawith (Byrd). Dunedin: G. S. Smith (Leonids).

The section's work is performed on similar lines to those of the American Meteor Society. The observers record the paths of meteors on special gnomonic maps, at the same time noting details of physical appearance, the whole record requiring less than a minute per meteor for an experienced observer. While every encouragement is given to observers to learn how to reduce their own observations, thereby gaining a lasting interest in meteoric astronomy, all observations are examined by the director, who alone is responsible for the deductions made. The observations are standardised and the reductions uniform. Acknowledgment is due to Dr C. P. Olivier, president of the American Meteor Society, to whom the director is indebted for personal guidance in the past and through whose kindness the recording maps and blanks are supplied to our members.

An important feature of the section's activities lies in the collection of data concerning meteorites and fireballs in this country. This aspect of our work brings the section frequently before the notice of the general public and creates an interest in meteors which it is hoped ultimately will provide additions to the ranks of our regular observers. To facilitate the collection of fireball data from the general public and the prompt notification of any particularly interesting objects, agencies have been established in eleven centres well scattered over the two islands, the majority of agents being persons with experience of meteor-observing. All reports collected are forwarded to the director for examination and publication. In the period covered by this report data of eight fireballs have been collected from 187 observers, while an additional 84 isolated reports of bright meteors have been received.

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When the late Dr Malzev, of Tashkent Observatory, found that the newly-discovered comet Peltier-Whipple was likely to provide a southern meteor shower in September, 1932, the information was cabled to the director and a special watch was made in this country by all members of the section. Clouds and moonlight, however, effectively combined to prevent any shower being observed.

The section also co-operated with Byrd's Second Antarctic Expedition, 1934, in the plan for the world-wide observation of meteor rates. Four standard reticles were used in this country, and observations were secured on most of the selected dates. Bad weather, however, frustrated the attempt to secure heights of meteors, for never did more than one station secure clear skies on a selected date.

Elaborate preparations were made to observe the 1932 return of the Leonids, a number of persons not regularly observing being enlisted for the purpose. Moon and clouds once again combined to nullify our efforts, although the director was able to determine a Leonid radiant on November 16. At Hamilton on the night of the expected shower a party of eight observers was on watch. In all £300 worth of cameras and telescopes were employed, but the sky remained clouded throughout.

A list of the most prominent meteor-showers, as revealed by the observations of the section, was published in the second report (Bulletin 21). Below are given notes of further radiants detected in the present period, additional to those previously published:—

Alpha Virginids.—Mean centre of radiation, 206°—10°; observed on April 16. A prominent shower.

Beta Piscid Australids.—335°–35°. July 17 to August 1, five radiants.

Eta Capricornids.—315°–20°. July 23–August 1, four radiants.

Iota Aquarids.—330°–14°. July 26–August 6, six radiants.

Nu Puppids.—100°–44.5° December 5–7 A rich shower.

In a number of instances observed radiants have been found to lie close to the predicted positions of cometary meteor showers. Such cases are tabulated below:—

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

No. Date. Radiant. Remarks.
° °
—Jan. 6 187—22 Comet 1860iv
608 1932 Jan. 13 182.5—20.3
—Feb. 5 201.4—33.6 Comet 1887iii.
614 1932 Feb. 3 203.5—37.5
—June 26 19.2—11.5 Comet 1874ii.
706 1934 June 22 11.7—11.3
—July 10 19.5—41.5 Comet 1886iii.
725 1933 July 22 19.0—46.0
—Sept. 10 53.0—16.0 Comet 1854iv.
837 1032 Sept. 30 53.0—18.5
– 63 –

The results of observations throughout New Zealand during 1932–1934 are given in the following tables:—

Table I. Details of Observations.
N.Z.M.T.
Date. Began. h. m. Ended. h. m. Tl. m. Meteors. Rate. Factor. Corrected Rate. Ob. Stn. Sky.
1932.
Jan. 4 21 27 23 30 123 16 12 1.0 12 G NP Clouds last 40m.
" 6–7 21 48 01 00 198 32 10 1.0 10 G NP Clear.
" 12–13 22 24 01 56 212 46 13 1.0 13 G NP Clear.
" 14 02 42 03 01 19 6 15 0.7 21 Mc Ak Misty and very cloudy.
" 17 21 47 23 32 105 12 7 0.8 8 G NP Clear; moon 8d.
Feb. 3–4 22 44 01 00 136 30 13 0.9 15 G Ot Slight haze.
" 13 22 50 23 28 38 5 8 1.0 8 Ba Wn Clear.
Mar. 6–7 22 11 01 20 189 27 8 1.0 8 G Ot 50% clouds 1st hour.
" 7–8 22 20 00 20 120 26 13 0.8 16 G Ot Clear.
" 11–12 22 52 01 52 180 30 10 09 11 G Ot Passing clouds.
" 17 02 26 03 42 76 9 7 1.0 7 Mc Ak Clear.
Apl. 6–7 22 16 02 00 224 49 13 0.8 16 G Ot Clouds at times.
" 11 02 38 04 40 122 29 14 0.9 16 Mc Ak Some cloud 1st hour.
" 12 02 40 04 25 105 21 11 0.8 14 Mc Ak Some cloud; misty.
" 25 18 45 20 45 120 11 5 1.0 5 Bu Wn Clear.
May 3 00 55 04 20 205 58 16 1.0 16 G Ot Clear.
" 4 02 55 04 50 115 39 20 1.0 20 Mc Ak Clear.
" 4 20 15 21 45 90 2 1 0.8 1 Bu Wn Passing clouds.
" 5 01 05 05 07 242 100 25 1.0 25 G Ot Clear.
" 5 02 55 04 20 85 33 23 0.9 26 Mc Ak Some cloud.
" 5 21 45 22 55 70 8 7 1.0 7 Bu Wn Clear.
" 6 01 27 02 02 35 6 10 1.0 10 G Ot Clear.
" 6 02 30 05 30 180 63 21 1.0 21 Bu Wn Clear.
" 6 02 37 06 02 205 92 27 1.0 27 G Ot Clear.
" 6–7 23 18 01 40 142 19 8 1.0 8 Ba Wn Clear.
" 7 01 00 01 50 50 10 12 09 13 Bu Wn Some cloud.
" 7 02 25 05 58 213 78 22 0.7 31 G Ot Frequent cloud.
" 7 02 20 03 00 40 9 13 0.9 15 Bu Wn Some cloud.
" 8 21 22 23 52 150 26 10 1.0 10 Bu Wn Slight haze.
" 9 02 10 05 31 201 63 19 0.6 31 G Ot Passing clouds.
" 9 02 35 04 19 91 22 15 10 15 Mc Ak Clear; 13m clouded.
" 13 03 37 04 30 83 24 17 0.9 19 Mc Ak Clouds at times.
" 14 02 48 05 30 162 48 18 1.0 18 Mc Ak Clear.
" 17 03 00 04 50 110 36 20 1.0 20 Mc Ak Clear.
" 27 21 58 22 35 37 7 13 1.0 13 G Ot Clear.
" 28 22 11 23 11 60 8 8 1.0 8 Bu Wn Clear.
June 2 02 55 04 15 80 17 13 1.0 13 Mc Ak Clear; mist at end.
" 6–7 23 10 01 10 120 31 15 1.0 15 Bu Wn Clear.
" 10 02 45 04 45 120 30 16 1.0 15 Mc Ak Clear.
" 11 12 23 15 01 13 118 25 12 0.9 13 G Ot Moon 8d.
" 13 02 58 04 40 94 20 13 1.0 13 Mc Ak Clear; mist at end.
" 14 02 43 05 00 137 38 16 0.9 18 Mc Ak Mist until 3½h.
" 22 18 35 19 35 60 4 4 1.0 4 Bu Wn Clouds at end.
" 30–1 23 17 00 25 68 18 16 0.8 20 G Ot Much cloud and haze.
– 64 –
1932.
July 2 00 45 02 20 95 21 14 0.8 17 Ba Wn Clear lh., then cloudy.
" 15 05 15 06 15 60 18 18 1.0 18 Bu Wn Clear.
" 28 00 00 02 00 120 44 22 1.0 22 Bu Wn Clear.
" 29 00 18 01 20 62 16 16 0.5 32 Ba Wn Passing cloud.
" 29 02 32 04 32 120 64 32 0.8 40 Mc Ak Clear; moon after 3½h.
" 29 20 05 21 50 105 13 7 0.5 15 G Ot Clear lh., then cloudy.
" 29–30 22 05 01 10 185 67 22 1.0 22 Ba Wn Clear.
" 30 02 05 03 30 85 49 34 1.0 34 Ba Wn Clear.
" 30 02 33 04 33 120 58 29 1.0 29 Bu Wn Clear.
" 30 02 40 04 30 110 50 27 1.0 27 Mc Ak Clear.
" 30–31 22 24 00 45 141 57 24 0.9 27 G Ot Hazy.
" 31 01 08 01 22 14 6 26 0.9 29 G Ot Hazy.
" 31–1 23 10 01 10 120 62 31 1.0 31 Bu Wn Clear.
" 31–1 23 15 01 45 150 61 24 0.8 30 G Ot Passing cloud; -haze.
Aug. 1 02 35 04 35 120 44 22 1.0 22 Mc Ak Clear.
" 1–2 23 40 01 40 120 57 28 1.0 28 Bu Wn Clear.
" 2 00 10 03 43 213 127 36 1.0 36 G Ot Clear.
" 3 00 08 00 58 50 25 30 1.0 30 G Ot Clear.
" 3–4 22 40 01 10 150 39 16 0.5 32 G Ot Passing cloud; haze.
" 6–7 22 52 23 52 60 17 17 0.9 19 G Ot Haze last ½h.
" 7 00 52 02 00 62 21 21 0.9 23 G Ot Haze last ½h.
Sept. 1–2 23 00 01 00 120 30 15 1.0 15 Bu Wn Clear.
" 6 00 25 01 25 60 10 10 1.0 10 G Ot Clear.
" 6–7 23 34 00 40 66 11 10 0.9 11 G Ot Moon 5d. 1st hour.
" 7 02 55 03 40 45 12 16 1.0 16 Mc Ak Some cloud.
" 10 03 54 04 40 46 12 16 1.0 16 Mc Ak Clear.
" 20 21 57 23 07 70 6 6 1.0 6 G Ot Slight haze at end.
" 25 23 35 00 35 60 6 6 1.0 6 Bu Wn Slight haze.
Oct. 1 00 15 04 15 240 42 10 1.0 10 Bu Wn Clear.
" 3 02 50 03 50 60 8 8 1.0 8 Mc Ak Clear.
Nov. 4 02 38 03 39 61 13 13 1.0 13 Mc Ak Clear.
" 15 02 15 03 40 30 0 Bu Wn Clear; full moon.
" 15 02 20 03 35 75 4 Ba Wn Clear; full moon.
" 15 02 40 03 40 60 2– Mc Ak Clear; full moon.
" 15 03 15 04 45 90 0 Mo NP Clear; full moon.
" 16 02 00 04 30 0 Mo NP Occasional cloud gaps.
" 16 02 51 04 00 69 6 Mc Ak Clouds; bright moon.
" 16 03 00 04 25 85 9 By Hn Clear bright moon.
" 16 03 00 04 30 90 5 Al Hn Clear; bright moon.
" 17 01 47 03 50 113 1 Ba Wn Clear at intervals; moon.
" 17 02 00 04 10 130 4 Bu Wn Passing cloud; moon.
" 18 02 00 04 10 130 4 Bu Wu Bright moon.
" 18 02 40 04 00 80 7 Mc Ak Passing Clouds; moon.
" 18 02 45 03 45 60 0 Al Hn Some cloud; moon.
Dec. 31 23 20 23 46 26 3 Bu Wn Clear.
1933.
Jan. 3–4 23 57 00 44 47
01 10 01 23 13 13 13 0.5 26 G NP Passing cloud.
" 24–25 23 04 01 30 146 40 16 1.0 16 G NP Clear.
" 21 21 15 21 54 39 3 Bu Wn Clear.
" 22 23 25 23 55 30 4 8 1.0 8 G Ot Clear at first.
Mar. 2 00 10 01 19 69 14 12 1.0 12 G Ot Clear.
" 3 22 35 23 37 62 10 10 1.0 10 Bu Wu Clear.
Apl. 5 23 00 23 30 30 4 8 1.0 8 Bu Wn Clear; moon setting.
" 16 22 10 23 15 65 7 7 1.0 7 Bu Wn Clear.
– 65 –
1933.
May 1 00 52 01 00 8 1 G Ot Clouds.
" 4 01 11 03 11 120 22 11 0.5 22 G Ot Haze; passing clouds.
" 4 03 08 05 10 101 38 23 0.8 29 Mc Ak Misty; passing clouds.
" 6 01 29 03 15 106 25 15 0.7 21 G Ot Cloudy at end.
" 7 02 19 04 19 120 28 14 0.7 20 G Ot Moon; passing cloud.
" 24–25 22 59 00 55 116 31 16 1.0 16 G Ot Clear.
June 29 22 21 23 47 86 27 19 0.8 24 G Ot Passing haze.
July 2 00 29 02 24 115 34 18 0.9 20 G Ot Clear; moon 1st ½h.
" 18 21 52 23 00 68 11 10 0.4 25 G Ot Almost totally clouded.
" 21 01 45 04 20 155 56 21 1.0 21 G Ot Clear.
" 23 01 48 05 45 237 109 28 0.9 31 G Ot Fog and cloud.
" 23–24 22 07 00 30 143 46 19 0.6 31 G Ot Passing cloud.
" 26–27 23 30 03 27 237 138 34 1.0 34 G Ot Clear.
" 27 02 50 04 40 110 31 17 1.0 17 Mc Ak Clear.
" 27 03 00 05 50 170 48 17 1.0 17 By Hn Clear.
" 28 03 00 06 00 180 25 8 1.0 8 Al Hn Clear.
" 29 00 13 03 54 221 103 28 0.7 40 G Ot Thick haze.
" 29 00 55 02 30 95 51 32 1.0 32 Ba Wn Clear.
" 29 02 55 05 45 170 74 26 1.0 26 Mc Ak Cleat.
Aug. 1 00 54 02 10 76 28 22 0.5 44 G Ot Moon 8d. haze.
" 1 04 30 04 35 5 3 By Hn Fog.
" 2 03 00 04 45 105 13 7 0.7 10 By Hn Showery; moon.
" 2 03 00 05 15 135 7 Al Hn Cloudy with rain.
Oct. 16 02 26 03 10 44 8 11 0.8 14 Mc Ak Passing clouds.
" 24 02 30 03 27 57 14 14 1.0 14 Mc Ak Clear.
Nov. 14 03 15 03 45 30 3 Bu Wu Cloud and haze.
" 16 02 40 03 50 70 7 6 1.0 6 Bu Wn Clear.
" 17 03 15 03 40 25 3 Bu Wn
1934.
Mar. 26 02 55 04 20 85 13 9 1.0 9 Mc Ak Clear.
Apl. 16 00 03 01 03 60 15 15 1.0 15 G Ot Clear.
May 15 02 53 04 00 21 4 12 0.8 15 Mc Ak Passing cloud.
" 25 02 50 04 00 70 15 13 0.8 15 Mc Ak Very misty.
June 11 02 45 03 20 35 2 Mc Ak Misty clouds.
" 14 02 45 04 45 120 22 11 1.0 11 Mc Ak Clear.
" 15 00 02 02 08 126 50 25 0.9 28 G Ot Passing clouds.
" 16 02 47 03 50 63 24 23 1.0 23 Mc Ak Clear.
" 23 03 10 04 30 65 23 21 0.9 23 Mc Ak Passing clouds.
July 12–13 23 27 00 28 61 14 14 0.6 23 G Ot 50% Passing cloud.
" 18 02 45 03 30 45 14 19 1.0 19 Mc Ak Clear.
" 19 02 55 04 00 62 19 19 1.0 19 Mc Ak Clear.
Aug. 1–2 23 43 00 57 74 30 24 0.8 30 G Ot Hazy.
" 6–7 22 30 00 56 146 56 23 1.0 23 G Ot Clear.
" 7 03 45 04 45 60 17 17 1.0 17 Mc Ak Slight mist.
" 8–9 22 45 03 04 259 100 23 1.0 23 G Ot Clear.
" 11 03 03 04 35 92 23 15 1.0 15 Mc Ak Clear.
Sept. 7 02 45 04 00 75 15 12 1.0 12 Mc Ak Clear.
Dec. 6 02 26 02 57 31 9 18 0.9 20 Mc Ak Clear; dawn.
" 7 02 23 03 03 40 9 13 0.8 16 Mc Ak Clear; dawn.

The abbreviations in the column “Station” are as follows:—Ak Auckland, Hn Hamilton, NP New Plymouth, Wn Wellington, Ot Otekura.

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Table II. List of Radiant Points Observed.
Radiant
No. Date. G.M.T. R.A. Dec. Mets. Wt. Obs. L. Remarks.
d. ° ° °
604 1932—Jan. 6.50 115.0 −14.8 F G 194.9
605 1932—Jan. 6.50 168.0 −59.0 G G " NZ 3.
606 1932—Jan. 12.53 180.0 −15.6 5 G G 201.0 NZ 209, 608.
607 1932—Jan. 12.53 184.0 −64.0 3/6 F G "
608 1932—Jan. 13.64 182.5 −20.3 4 G Mc 202.1 Inc. I statu. 209 606.
609 1933—Jan. 24.55 141.0 −0.5 4 F G 213.8
610 1933—Jan. 24.55 149.5 −24.5 5/7 G G "
611 1933—Jan. 24.55 188.0 −38.5 G G "
612 1933—Jan. 24.55 198.0 −23.5 6 G G "
613 1932—Feb. 3.52 189.0 −48.5 ¾ F G 223.0
614 1932—Feb. 3.52 203.5 −37.5 5 F G "
615 1932—Feb. 3.52 209.0 −31.0 4 G G
616 1932—Mar. 6.52 185.9 −69.0 4 G G 254.9
617 1932—Mar. 6.52 242.7 −54.7 6 G G " ? NZ 622.
618 1932—Mar. 7.49 162.0 −15.6 G G 255.9
619 1932—Mar. 7.49 205.0 −34.0 ¾ G G " D. 156, 3.
620 1932—Mar. 7.49 263.0 −78.8 1 G G " 1 stationary.
621 1932—Mar. 11.53 210.0 −80.0 4 F G 260.0
622 1932—Mar. 1153 240.0 −52.0 5 G G " ? NZ 617.
623 1934—Mar. 25.67 272.5 −27.5 4 G Mc 273.4
624 1932—Apl. 6.53 222.5 −11.5 4/6 G G 285.6 NZ 241.
625 1932—Apl. 6.53 2247 −380 ¾ F G "
626 1932—Apl. 10.67 256.0 −56.5 1 G Mc 289.6 1 statn. NZ 290.
627 1932—Apl. 10.67 275.0 −28.0 G Mc
628 1932—Apl. 11.67 240.5 −26.0 4 G Mc 290.6 NZ 143, 145.
629 1932—Apl. 10–11e 286.5 −21.0 G Mc 290.1
630 1934—Apl. 15.48 107.2 −66.9 1 G G 293.9 1 stationary.
631 1933—Apl. 16.43 206.0 −10.0 4 G Bu 295.1 Vir.
632 1932—May 2.62 258.0 −20.0 F G 311.1 D. 190, 2.
633 1932—May 2.62 285.0 −25.0 ¾ F G " NZ 687.
634 1932—May 2.62 295.0 −40.0 4 G G " NZ 644.
635 1932—May 2.62 318.0 −36.0 5 F G " Diffuse.
636 1932—May 2.62 335.5 −2.5 5 F G " Diffuse. Aqr.
637 1933—May 3.60 299.5 −7.5 ¾ F G 311.9 NZ 645
638 1933—May 3.60 336.3 −0.8 8 G G " Aqi.
639 1932—May 3.68 26.0 14.0 2 G Mc 312.2 Inc. 1 statn. D. 200, 7.
640 1932—May 3.68 335.0 −1.0 16 G Mc " Aqr.
641 193—May 3.69 335.0 −1.5 12 G Mc 312.0 Aqr.
642 1932—May 4.65 277.0 −24.0 4 F G 313.1 Lambda Sgr.
643 1932—May 4.65 284.0 −16.0 4 F G " NZ 655, 670.
644 1932—May 4.65 294.5 −45.5 6 G G " ? NZ 634.
645 1932—May 4.65 296.7 −5.0 5 F G " NZ 637.
646 1932—May 4.65 320.0 −19.0 4 G G " Delta Cap.
647 1932—May 4.65 320.0 −34.0 ¾ P G " Iota PsA.
648 1932—May 4.65 337.5 −2.0 34 G G " Diffuse. Eta Aqr.
649 1932—May 4.67 276.5 −26.0 5/7 G Me 313.1 Diffuse. Lambda Sgr.
650 1932—May 4.67 285.0 −50.0 4 G Mc "
651 1932—May 4.67 336.5 −1.0 7 F Mc " Diffuse. Eta Aqr.
652 1933—May 5.60 281.0 −30.5 P G 313.8 NZ 654, 678.
653 1933—May 5.00 337 5 −0.5 6 G 313.8 Eta Aqr.
– 67 –
654 1932–May 5.67 281.0 −36.0 5 F G 314.1 NZ 652, 678.
655 1932–May 5.67 285.0 −15.0 F G " NZ 643, 670.
656 1932–May 5.67 293.5 10.0 7 G G " Gamma Aql.
657 1932–May 5.67 308.0 15.0 4 G G " Beta Del.
658 1932–May 5.67 321.0 −18.0 6 F G " Delta Cap.
659 1932–May 5.67 337.5 −0.8 23 G G " Diffuse. Eta Aqr.
660 1932–May 5.67 346.0 −40.7 5 G G "
661 1932–May 4–5c 296.0 −33.5 5 F Bu 313.6
662 1932–May 4–5c 325.0 −15.0 6 F Bu " Delta Cap.
663 1932–May 4–5c 336.0 −28.0 6/8 F Bu " Diffuse.
664 1932–May 4–5c 337.0 −2.0 13 F Bu " Diffuse. Eta Aqr.
665 1932–May 6.54 235.5 −24.5 ¾ G Ba 315.1
666 1933–May 6.66 310.0 −32.0 4 G G 314.8
667 1933–May 6.66 337.5 0.0 5 P G " Eta Aqr.
668 1932–May 6.69 267.3 −36.0 4 F G 315.2
669 1932–May 6.69 338.6 −0.6 29 G G " Eta Aqr.
670 1932–May 7.60 282.0 −19.0 5 F Bu 316.1 NZ 643, 655.
671 1932–May 8.66 340.0 0.0 6 G Mc 317.0 Eta Aqr.
672 1932–May 8.68 270.7 −8.6 4/6 G G 317.0
673 1932–May 8.68 303.8 −16.8 G G " Beta Cap.
674 1932–May 8.68 309.2 14.2 4 G G " Beta Del.
675 1932–May 8.68 318.0 −57.0 4 G G "
676 1932–May 8.68 323.0 −34.0 6 G G " Iota PsA.
677 1932–May 8.68 339.3 1.0 13 G G " Eta Aqr.
678 1932–May 12.68 284.5 −340 7 G Mc 321.0 NZ 652.
679 1932–May 12.68 285.0 −5.0 F Mc "
680 1932–May 12.68 309.0 14.0 4 G Mc " Beta Del.
681 1932–May 12.68 330.0 −20.0 4 F Mc "
682 1932–May 12.68 334.0 −34.0 4/6 G Mc " Iota PsA.
683 1932–May 12.68 343.7 2.5 13 G Mc " Eta Aqr.
684 1932–May 16.68 244.0 −33.0 4 P Mc 324.9 Diffuse. NZ 376.
685 1932–May 16.68 264.0 −17.0 4 G Mc "
686 1932–May 16.68 279.0 9.5 4 P Mc " ? D. 212.
687 1932–May 16.68 286.5 −27.5 G Mc " NZ 633.
688 1933–May 24.50 246.0 −39.0 G G 332.2
689 1933–May 24.50 267.5 −30.5 F G
690 1932–May 31.42 217.7 −172 1 G G 339.2 1 statn.
691 1932–June 1.67 282.0 −34.0 ¾ G Mc 340.3 NZ 385, 36.
692 1932–June 6.53 296.0 −12.0 4 G Bu 345.3 NZ 704, AMS 1066.
693 1932–June 9.68 276.0 −30.0 F Mc 348.4 Diffuse. 388, 391, 304.
694 1932–June 11.56 283.0 −27.5 F G 350.3 NZ 34, AMS 1054. 702.
695 1934–June 13.68 307.5 −18.0 5 G Mc 351.6
696 1934–June 13.68 326.5 −29.0 5 G Mc "
697 1932–June 12–13c 9.5 −27.5 F Mc 351.5
698 1932–June 12–13c 277.5 −20.5 5 F Mc " Diffuse.
699 1932–June 12–13c 337.5 −33.0 5 G Mc " Iota PsA.
700 1932–June 12–13c 351.0 −14.0 F Mc "
701 1934–June 14.57 268.0 −19.0 8 G G 352.5 AMS 1005, D. 204, 1.
702 1934–June 14.57 277.0 −35.0 ¾ F G " NZ 388, 693.
703 1934–June 14.57 343.5 −45.5 4 G G " NZ 37, 159. [1066.]
704 1934–June 15.66 290.0 −14.5 6 G Mc 353.6 NZ 400, 403, 707, AMS
705 1934–June 15.66 333.5 −7.5 1 G Mc " 1 stats. AMS 1150.
706 1934–June 22.68 11.7 −11.3 1 G Mc 0.4 1 statn. meteor.
707 1934–June 22.68 296.0 −11.0 6 G Mc " 400, 403, 704.
708 1933–June 28.48 261.0 −33.0 3/6 F G 6.2
709 1932–June 30.52 301.0 −15.5 5 F G 8.4 ? 44.
710 1932–July 1.58 329.0 −45.0 4 F Ba 9.4
711 1933–July 1.58 324.8 −14.6 G G 9.2 Iota Cap.
712 1933–July 1.58 331.4 −12.8 G G 9.2
713 1933–July 1.58 336.7 −48.0 4 G G "
714 1933–July 1.58 342.0 −28.0 F G
– 68 –
715 1932–July 14.76 48.0 −82.0 6 G Bu 219
716 1934–July 17–18c 14.0 −20.5 G Mc 25.4 Beta Cet.
717 1934–July 17–18c 334.0 −37.5 ¾ F Mc " Beta PsA.
718 1933–July 18.47 316.8 −17.8 2 G G 25.6 Inc. 1 statn.
719 1933–July 20.64 10.5 −21.0 5 G G 27.7 Beta Cet.
720 1933–July 20.0 20.0 −43.5 G G " 59.
721 1933–July 20.64 324.5 −17.0 G G " Iota Cap.
722 1933–July 20.64 334.7 −35.5 5 G G " Beta PsA.
723 1933–July 20.64 348.0 −32.0 5/7 G " Alpha PsA.
724 1933–July 22.64 17.5 −53.0 ¾ F G 29.6
725 1933–July 22.64 19.0 −46.0 6/9 G G " 751.
726 1933–July 22.64 37.5 −1.0 G G "
727 1933–July 22.64 51.5 −32.5 8/9 G G "
728 1933–July 22.64 57.5 4.5 4 G G "
729 1933–July 22.64 325.5 −15.2 5/7 G G " Iota Cap.
730 1933–July 22.64 339.0 −33.0 6 G G " Beta PsA.
731 1933–July 22.64 339.6 −19.0 6/7 G G " Delta Aqr.
732 1933–July 23.47 314.0 −200 G G 30.5 Eta Cap.
733 1933–July 23.47 315.0 −42.0 4 G G " AMS 1473.
734 1933–July 23.47 340.0 −20.0 5 G G " Delta Aqr.
735 1933–July 26.58 4.5 −2.5 2/4 P G 33.4 AMS 543.
736 1933–July 26.58 17.4 4.5 7 G G " D. 11, 4.
737 1933–July 26.58 30.5 −34.3 4 G G " ? 458.
738 1933–July 26.68 31.7 −17.0 4 G G " 464.
739 1933–July 26.58 313.5 −19.0 15 G G " Eta Cap.
740 1933–July 26.58 319.5 −30.0 7/9 G G "
741 1933–July 26.58 322.5 −41.5 4 G G " 66, 73.
742 1933–July 26.58 327.5 −15.0 5 P G " Iota Cap.
743 1933–July 26.58 330.0 −14.0 4/6 G G " Iota Aqr.
744 1933–July 28.58 340.0 −29.0 11/17 G G " Alpha PsA.
745 1933–July 26.58 341.7 −17.4 9 G G " Delta Aqr.
746 1933–July 26.58 351.3 −18.7 6 G G " 57, 823, ? 762.
747 1933–July 26.68 4.0 −22.5 ¾ G Mc 33.5 Beta Cet.
748 1933–July 26.68 68.0 −54. 4 G Mc "
749 1933–July 26.68 342.0 −17.5 6 G Mc " Delta Aqr.
750 1933–July 26.69 5.0 −12.0 4 F By 33.5 D. 4, 1; 4, 2; NZ 507.
751 1933–July 26.69 15.5 −42.5 5 G By " 725.
752 1933–July 26.69 314.0 −30.0 F By " Diffuse.
753 1933–July 26.69 315.0 −22.0 6 F By " Diffuse. Eta Cap.
754 1933–July 26.69 341.0 −30.5 4 F By " Alpha PsA.
755 1933–July 26.69 339.5 −20.0 4 F By " Delta Aqr.
756 1932–July 27.50 337.0 −18.0 12 P Bu " Diffuse. Delta Aqr.
757 1933–July 27.56 339.0 −250 7 F Bu " 75, 551. D. 262.
758 1932–July 28.55 340.0 −17.5 8 G Ba 35.6 Delta Aqr.
759 1933–July 28.59 333.0 −33.5 6 F Ba " Beta PsA.
760 1933–July 28.59 341.0 −17.0 5/11 G Ba " Diffuse. Delta Aqr.
761 1933–July 28.59 350.7 −130.5 G Ba " 823, ? 746.
762 1933–July 28.60 325.0 −14.0 G G 35.7 Iota Cap.
763 1933–July 28.60 337.0 −12.0 6 G G " Iota Aqr.
764 1933–July 28.60 341.0 −31.5 6/8 G G 35.7 Alpha PsA.
765 1933–July 28.60 342.3 −17.5 27 G G " Delta Aqr.
766 1933–July 28.60 342.7 −17.2 1 G G " 1 statn. Delta Aqr.
767 1932–July 28.67 11.5 −11.0 F Mc 35.5 65, 793.
768 1932–July 28.67 320.0 −14.0 4/6 G Mc " ? Iota Cap.
769 1932–July 28.67 340.0 −27.5 4 F Mc " Alpha PsA.
770 1932–July 28.67 341.0 −16.5 17 G Mc " Delta Aqr.
771 1933–July 28.70 40.0 4.0 4 F Mc 35.5
772 1933–July 28.70 342.0 −18.0 10 G Mc " Delta Aqr.
773 1933–July 28.70 349.5 −3.0 10 G Mc " AMS 8, 1530; D. 263, 208.
774 1933–July 20.28c 25.0 −55.5 6 G Mc 34.5
– 69 –
775 1932–July 29.40 339.0 −17.8 5 F G 36.4 Delta Aqr.
776 1932–July 29.51 340.0 −17.5 8 G Ba 36.5 Delta Aqr.
777 1932–July 29.55 341.0 −17.5 22 G Ba " Delta Aqr.
778 1932–July 29.55 345.0 −18.0 1 G Ba " 1 statn.
779 1932–July 29.58 335.0 −16.0 8 G Ba " Iota Aqr.
780 1932–July 29.54 327.0 −21.0 19 G Ba " ? Iota Cap.
781 1932–July 29.61 337.5 −9.5 7 G Ba " AMS 1173.
782 1932–July 29.63 336.0 2.5 4 G Ba " D. 260, 7.
783 1932–July 29.67 342.0 −16.0 14 P Bu " Diffuse. Delta Aqr.
784 1932–July 29.67 325.0 −13.0 ¾ F Mc " Iota Cap.
785 1932–July 29.67 336.0 −0.5 5 G Mc " Zeta Aqr.
786 1932–July 29.67 338.0 −25.0 ¾ P Mc " Alpha PsA.
787 1932–July 29.67 342.0 −17.0 14 G Mc " Delta Aqr.
788 1932–July 30.50 320.0 −13.5 F G 37.5 Iota Cap.
789 1932–July 30.50 331.5 −14.5 9 G G " Iota Aqr.
790 1932–July 30.50 334.5 −1.0 3 F G " Zeta Aqr.
791 1932–July 30.50 343.0 −17.0 14 G G " Delta Aqr.
792 1932–July 30.50 345.0 −22.0 4 G G " ? Alpha PsA.
793 1932–July 30.67 19.0 −11.0 F Mc " 65, 768, AMS 1236.
794 1932–July 30.67 101.0 5.0 4 P Mc "
795 1932–July 30.67 343.0 −16.5 14 G Mc " Delta Aqr.
796 1932–July 30.67 345.5 −27.5 4 G Mc " Alpha PsA.
797 1932–July 31.53 329.0 9.0 8/9 F Bu 38.5 AMS 1127, 1484, D. 252.
798 1932–July 31.53 343.0 −15.0 19 F Bu " Diffuse. Delta Aqr.
799 1932–July 31.54 333.0 −14.0 G G " Iota Aqr.
800 1932–July 31.54 343.5 −16.0 12/13 G G " Delta Aqr.
801 1932–July 31.54 348.5 −29.0 5 F G " Alpha PsA.
802 1933–July 31.58 344.0 −16.0 14 G G 38.4 Delta Aqr.
803 1933–Jly. 31–Ag. lc 341.0 −30.5 4 F By 39.0 Alpha PsA.
804 1934–Aug. 1.54 343.5 −17.0 9 G G 38.2 Delta Aqr.
805 1932–Aug. 1.55 340.0 −25.0 7/9 P Bu 39.5 ? Alpha PsA.
806 1932–Aug. 1.55 345.0 −14.5 12 G Bu " Delta Aqr.
807 1932–Aug. 1.60 11.0 −18.5 8/11 G G 39.5 Beta Cet.
808 1932–Aug. 1.60 29.0 −10.5 3/6 G G " 446.
809 1932–Aug. 1.60 39.0 −3.5 5/7 G G " 472.
810 1932–Aug. 1.60 333.0 −17.5 6 G G " AMS 1507.
811 1932–Aug. 1.60 335.0 −35.0 8 G G " Beta PsA.
812 1932–Aug. 1.60 340.0 −30.0 8/11 G G " Alpha PsA Diffuse.
813 1932–Aug. 1.60 344.0 −16.0 22 G G " Diffuse. Delta Aqr.
814 1932–Aug. 1.60 354.0 −20.5 9/12 G G " d1 Aqr.
815 1932–Aug. 2.54 343.5 −15.5 6/7 G G 40.4 Delta Aqr.
816 1932–Aug. 2–3c 345.0 −15.0 6 F G 40.9 Delta Aqr.
817 1932–Aug. 3–6c 18.5 −45 ¾ F G 43.8 ? D. 11, 5. [1497.
818 1932–Aug. 3–6c 334.0 −27.5 4/6 G G " 75, 551; D. 262, AMS 1157.
819 1932–Aug. 3–6c 346.0 −13.0 G G " Delta Aqr.
820 1934–Aug. 6.61 324.0 −62.0 G G 43.9
821 1934–Aug. 6.61 333.5 −13.0 5 G G " Iota Aqr.
822 1934–Aug. 6.61 345.5 −150 6/7 P G " Delta Aqr.
823 1934–Aug. 6.61 354.5 −10.0 5 F G " 746, 762.
324 1934–Aug. 6.70 347.5 −11.5 ¾ G Mc 44.0 Delta Aqr.
825 1934–Aug. 8.56 15.0 22.0 9/13 G G 45.9
826 1934–Aug. 8.56 58.5 −19.5 1 G G " 1 statu. ? 479.
827 1934–Aug. 8.56 97.5 −56.5 2 G G " Inc. 1 statn.
828 1934–Aug. 8.56 340.5 −41.0 5/9 G G "
829 1934–Aug. 8.56 340.5 −27.5 12 G G " Alpha PsA.
830 1934–Aug. 8.56 345.0 −15.5 11 F G " Delta Aqr.
831 1932–Sept. 1.48 21.5 −11.5 8 G Bu 69.6 ? 543.
832 1932–Sept. 1.53 31.0 0.0 1 G Bu " 1 statn.
833 1932–Sept. 6.66 67.0 2.5 G Mc 74.7 D. 60, 3.
834 1934–Sept. 6.66 19.0 −5.5 ¾ G Mc 74.2 D. 14, 5.
835 1934–Sept. 6.66 30.0 19.0 ¾ G Mc " D. 27, 8; 27, 9.
– 70 –
836 1932–Sept. 30.61 47.5 −52.5 6 G Bu 98.2
837 1932–Sept. 30.61 53.0 −18.5 6 F Bu "
838 1932–Sept. 30.61 75.0 −18.0 4 P Bu " T.C. 220 ?.
839 1934–Oct. 23.64 60.0 3.7 ¾ G Mc 120.4 D. 60, 6.
840 1934–Oct. 23.64 94.0 15.5 ¾ F Mc " Orionids.
841 1932–Oct. 30.49 87.0 −9.0 5 G Bu 127.7
842 1932–Nov. 15.66 147.5 25.5 5 G Mc 143.8 Leonids.
843 1933–Nov. 22.54 0.0 −76.5 1 G G 150.4 1 statn telesc.
844 1934–Dec. 5–6c 64.0 −49.5 2/4 F Mc 163.8
845 1934–Dec. 6.63 100.0 −44.5 7 G Mc 164.3 124, 594.

In the “Remarks” column D refers to Denning's General Catalogue of Meteor Radiants, the first figures to the group, the final ones to the radiant number; AMS refers to the various lists of the American Meteor Society; BAA to the radiants of the British Astronomical Association; numbers without initial letters, or in some cases with NZ prefixed, refer to the radiants published by the Meteor Section of the New Zealand Astronomical Society, Inc. TC to Circulars of the Tashkent Observatory.

Explanation of Tables

Table I.—Details of Observations. This table gives details of the watches performed by the various observers, and is similar in form to those in the previous reports. The rate actually observed per hour (column 6) is corrected by a factor (column 7) which attempts to make allowance for hindrances to observation, such as clouds or moonlight the corrected rate being given in column 8. The estimation of rates has not been attempted for very short watches or in cases where the hindrance to observation was too great for any certainty to be attached to the factor.

Table II.—List of Radiants. This follows the form in the preceding report, being arranged in order of date. At least four meteors observed on one night and intersecting in a circle 2° in diameter, or at least five on adjacent nights, or one stationary meteor being required to form these radiants.

The numerous statistical tables published in previous reports will not be included in future. The collection of the statistics is being continued, however, and eventually will be made the subject of a special paper.

Conclusion.

The need for additional meteor observers in the Southern Hemisphere, and especially in this country, remains acute. Although the section has contributed considerable data to our knowledge, or lack of knowledge, of the southern meteor showers, the need for a larger annual output is revealed by the work remaining to be done. In the past ten years, for example, there were 150 dates in the year on which no observations were secured, while on a further 109 days observations have been secured only once in the period. On only 106 days of the year have observations been secured more than once. The months from March to August have been fairly satisfactorily covered by observers, but for the months September to February inclusive, the most comfortable observing period of the year, observations are very few in number, although there are indications that some fairly high rates of meteoric activity can be secured in the period.

Private Observatory, 23 Hollywood Avenue, Epsom, Auckland, S.E.3. August 14, 1935.