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Volume 69, 1940
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Observation of Meteors for the Years 1935–1938 in New Zealand.
Fourth Report Of The Meteor. Section Of Tee N.Z. Astronomical. Society, Inc.

[Read before the Wellington Branch, July 26, 1939; received by the Editor, July 27, 1939; issued separately, March, 1940.]

This report, covering the work performed in the four-year period 1935-38, is the fourth published by the Meteor Section of the New Zealand Astronomical Society, Inc., the earlier reports having been published in Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, vol. 60, p. 448, and vol. 63, p. 443, and Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand, vol. 66, p. 60. These reports have been reprinted and distributed as Bulletins nos. 5, 21 and 24 of the New Zealand Astronomical Society.

The attention of members of the Meteor Section has been concentrated mainly on the ordinary routine of recording meteors in extended watches for the purpose of determining centres of radiation and rates of activity. The work has proceeded very slowly, because the personnel has always been small, but the experience gained by members over the years has resulted in a very satisfactory standard of accuracy being attained.

As a result of this steady endeavour on the part of a few, the total meteors recorded by the section during the twelve years of its existence is 13,126, from which over one thousand radiants have been deduced. While this figure is no more than other meteor groups can produce in a single year, it must be remembered that the New Zealand work is being performed in the southern celestial hemisphere, where no other group or individual has observed for more than a short period. The data we are collecting are therefore of particular value in many ways.

A stage has now been reached when the section must gain fresh observers if the valuable work is to continue. One of our most energetic members, Mr. M. Geddes, has now become Director of the new Carter Observatory, upon which his friends in the Meteor Section most heartily congratulate him. This appointment robs the section of a very active worker. Similarly, our work has now reached a sage where the writer must concentrate more upon the production of articles covering many phases of the work achieved, together with theoretical papers, and will probably in the next year or so be able to find time only for special researches as the need arises. It is to be hoped, therefore, that members of the Society who are not actively observing will step into the breach and help to continue the work

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The following table summarises the work performed daring the period covered by the report:—

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Observer. Nights. Time. Meteors.
h. m.
Bateson (B) 1 2 35 18
Geddes (G) 39 74 4 1,162
Fairbrother (F) 34 73 44 874
McIntosh (M) 33 40 15 940
Total 107 190 38 2,994

Reports of telescopic meteors were received from members of the New Zealand Astronomical Society during the period as follows:—Bateson, 3; Bryce, 1; Geddes, 22; McIntosh, 14; Morshead, 5; Smith, 15; Sofield, 1. Total, 61.

Details of fourteen bright fireballs have been collected from the public, most of which await investigation. (Unfortunately, although they contain several very interesting objects, publication cannot be achieved while more important meteoric topics are awaiting attention.) Large numbers of observations of isolated fireballs are also in hand, and my thanks are due to the Dominion Observatory, the Carter Observatory, and many individuals too numerous to mention, for making these reports available.

The seven papers published during the period by the Director are indicative of the results achieved by the Meteor Section to date. The Ephemeris of the Eta Aquarid Radiant (Monthly Notices Royal Astron. Soc., 95, 7, 601; 1935, May), while tracing the day-to-day motion of this radiant, also demonstrated the accuracy which can be attained in visual meteor work, and is especially valuable at the present time while mathematicians are attempting to disparage the amateur meteor worker. The Index to Southern Meteor Showers (Monthly Notices Royal Astron. Soc., 95, 8, 709; 1935, June) is particularly valuable to members of our Section in that it provides the first indication of what minor radiants may be expected at any time.

The Velocities of Meteor Streams (Monthly Notices Royal Astron. Soc., 96, 7, 704; 1936, May), The Telescopic Determination of Meteor Radiants (Journal Brit. Astron. Assoc., 46, 2, 73; 1935, Dec), and Meteor Static (Journal Brit. Astron. Assoc., 44, 3, 123; 1937, Jan.) open up new ground. In The Determination of the Real Paths of Fireballs (Journ. R.A.S. Canada, 32, 1, 1; 1938, Jan.) a complete method of dealing with large numbers of reports by inexperienced observers is published, I believe, for the first time in English. Finally, the first indication of the variation in the numbers of meteors throughout the year was given in a paper read at the Auckland sessions of the Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science and later published in America (Popular Astronomy, 46, 9, 516; 1938, Nov.).

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In the preparation of this report the existence of some radiants additional to those listed in the Index to Southern Meteor Radiants was disclosed. These are given in the following table:—

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New Radiants.
No. Duration, Radiant. No. of Radiants. Name.
321 Aug. 30-Sept. 6 13°— 9° 5
19 — 6 21 Cet.
322 Aug. 2–4 39 —16 3 Pi Cet.
323 April 17–25 200 —24 4 — Vir.
324 May 7 257 —13 2 Omricon Ser.
325 May 19–31 252 —20 7 Eta Oph.
257 —24
326 April 10–15 253 —53 4 Beta Ara.
260 —50
327 June 10–16 262 —35 2 Lambda Ser.
328 June 2–14 269 —33 7 Delta Sgr. ii.
277 —35
329 May 30-June 4 285 —18 2 U Sgr.
330 June 2–16 284 —23 7 Lambda Sgr. i.
331 June 4–8 296 —25 3 Omega Sgr.
332 June 14–21 296 —36 2 — Sgr.
333 July 1–11 324 —15 4 Iota Aqr. i.
334 July 10–11 332 —32 2 Mu PsA.
335 Aug. 13–20 330 —9 3 Rho Aqr.
336 August 2 330 —4 3 30 Aqr.
337 July 22-Aug. 1 342 —32 6 Delta PsA.
338 Aug. 2–10 344 —15 7 94 Aqr.
356 —15

In listing two accordances of observed radiants with the predicted radiants of periodic comets the remarks in the second report mast be borne in mind. The publication of such agreements does not necessarily indicate that the meteors are definitely debris of the comets particularly named.

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Comet Accordances.
Object. Date. Radiant. Remarks.
Comet Schaumasse Mar. 30 298.5°—9.64dE Davidson.
Radiant 859 Apl. 3 294 —99 4/6 meteors.
Comet 1877 ii Aug. 9 32.0 —18.5 Weiss.
Comet 1852 ii Aug. 10 40-5 —13.5 Weiss.
Radiant 1000 Aug. 2 39.0 —17.5 4 meteors.

In the following table the details concerning the various observations are given in the manner usual to these reports. Apart from the date and time spent observing, from which the hourly rate is derived, a factor is estimated by each observer allowing for any hindrances to observing such as clouds or haze. With this factor the observed rate is corrected to a theoretical rate (column 8) for perfect observing conditions. The estimation of rates is not attempted in very short watches or where the factor is so small as to cast doubts upon the reliability of the corrected rate deduced.

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Some interesting points can be gleaned from a perusal of this table, which can only be indicated here. Take, for example, the date, 1935, May 6. Observing about the same time, Fairbrother saw 14 meteors an hour in a clear sky, while McIntosh saw 26 an hour, also in clear sky. The difference between the rates can safely be ascribed to the inexperience of the former observer, who had just commenced working for the Section, and who apparently missed a number of the fainter meteors. The higher rates obtained by Geddes, on the other hand, when compared with those of McIntosh (both experienced observers) is an index to the difference between country and town observations.

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Details OF Observations.
N.Z.M.T. Began. Ended. Total. Meteors. Rate Factor. car.Rate Observer. Station. Remarks.
h. m. h. m. m.
1935
Jan. 5 22 23 23 33 60 2 2 1.0 2 G NP Clear; 10 m. gap.
26 20 40 22 16 61 7 7 0.6 12 G NP Passing cloud; 25 m. gap.
28 21 15 21 20 5 1 G NP Stopped by clouds.
29 20 46 23 35 229 53 14 1.0 14 G NP Clear.
Feb. 1–2 23 00 02 05 185 23 7 1.0 7 F T Clouds in south.
3 00 00 02 15 135 24 11 0.9 12 F T Clouds after 1.30.
4 00 00 01 05 65 7 7 0.9 12 F T Misty horizon.
Mar. 1–2 23 25 02 25 180 27 9 0.9 10 F T Haze in N.E.
30 01 30 02 31 61 5 5 1.0 5 F T Clear; moon 2 ½d.
.31 00 00 02 00 120 21 10 1.0 10 F T Clear.
Apl. 4 02 20 04 20 120 33 16 1.0 16 M A Clear.
11-12 23 26 00 15 50 8 0 1.0 9 G O Clear.
12-13 23 40 02 00 140 25 11 1.0 11 F T Clear.
14 02 30 04 05 95 18 12 1.0 12 F T Clear.
May 1 (01 20 02 24)
(02 58 03 45) 179 24 8 G O Much cloud.
3 01 44 02 00 16 8 31 G O Passing cloud.
4 02 20 04 15 115 26 13 0.9 14 F T Slight haze.
4 02 48 04 20 92 32 22 0.8 28 M A Totally clouded 50 m.
0 01 00 04 45 220 53 14 1.0 14 F T Clear.
0 02 45 04 20 95 44 26 1.0 26 M A Clear.
7 03 31 05 10 120 62 31 1.0 31 M A Clear.
8 02 45 05 15 150 58 23 1.0 23 M A Clear.
9 03 58 04 43 45 25 33 1.0 33 M A Clear.
30-31 22 32 00 39 127 28 14 1.0 14 G O Clear.
June 2 01 15 03 10 121 26 13 1.0 13 F T Clear.
8 01 53 03 17 84 30 21 1.0 21 G O Clear.
July 4 02 55 04 30 95 20 12 1.0 12 M A Clear.
6 03 12 03 48 31 13 25 1.0 25 M A Misty: 5 m. gap.
7 00 15 03 00 165 39 14 1.0 14 F T Clear.
11 03 07 04 53 106 40 23 1.0 23 M A Clear.
11 22 05 24 00 115 7 3 0.0 5 F T Moon 10d.
12 03 16 04 40 84 26 22 1.0 22 M A Clear.
25 22 51 23 23 22 4 12 G O Half cloud; 10 m. gap.
27 02 00 03 OC 66 21 19 0.8 24 F T Intermittent cloud.
27 03 30 03 56 26 23 30 M A Clear.
28 00 00 02 35 155 71 28 1.0 28 F T Clear.
28 01 12 02 36 84 40 28 1.0 28 M A Clear.
29 00 06 03 00 174 89 30 1.0 30 G O Clear.
30-31 23 40 01 35 115 53 28 1.0 28 F T Clear.
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Aug. 1 02 27 04 27 120 81 40 1.0 40 G O Clear.
1 02 30 03 31 61 33 33 1.0 33 M A Clear.
1 04 02 04 32 30 17 34 1.0 34 M A Clear.
2 22 30 23 50 80 27 20 1.0 20 F T Clear.
3 00 00 04 10 240 132 33 1.0 33 G O Clear.
3 02 40 04 15 93 46 30 1.0 30 M A Clear.
7 01 33 02 45 72 32 27 0.9 30 G O Passing cloud.
8 00 45 02 45 120 27 13 0.8 17 F T Passing cloud.
10 02 30 04 00 90 27 18 1.0 18 F T Clear.
31 00 25 02 35 130 27 13 1.0 13 F T Clear.
Sept. 1 00 00 02 00 120 26 13 1.0 13 F T Clear.
1-2 23 00 01 10 130 26 12 1.0 12 F T Clear.
3 00 00 02 20 140 28 12 1.0 12 F T Clear.
29 00 20 02 00 100 17 10 1.0 10 F T Clear.
Oct. 18–19 23 12 00 55 103 11 7 0.8 9 F T Passing cloud.
21 (02 35 03 06)
(03 22 03 30) 39 12 18 0.7 26 M A Clear; moon 22d
Nov. 22–23 22 50 01 30 160 15 6 1.0 6 F T Clear.
27 00 00 02 15 135 24 11 1.0 11 F T Clear.
Dec. 22 22 20 23 20 60 11 11 1.0 11 G NP Clear.
20 02 25 02 57 32 10 19 0.7 27 G NP Dawn.
1930
Feb. 20–27 23 07 00 33 86 18 12 1.0 12 G O Clear.
28-29 22 00 01 01 185 27 9 1.0 9 F CI Clear.
Ap. 17–18 (23 47 00 05)
(00 25 01 02) 55 11 12 1.0 12 G E Clear.
25 20 20 23 35 195 21 7 0.9 8 F CI Haze on horizon.
27 02 30 04 00 90 11 7 0.7 10 G E Fog and haze.
27 02 37 03 45 68 9 9 1.0 9 M A Clear.
28 02 30 04 35 125 26 13 1.0 13 G E Clear.
29 02 30 03 35 65 5 5 0.4 12 G E Very foggy.
June 18–17 23 04 00 44 100 33 20 1.0 20 G E Clear.
21-22 22 20 00 20 120 36 18 1.0 18 G E Clear.
22 22 23 22 57 34 3 6 0.9 6 G E Hazy.
Jul. 10–11 23 00 01 00 120 17 8 0.5 16 F CI Moon last quarter.
15 02 32 03 42 70 14 12 1.0 12 M A Clear.
16 02 30 02 50 20 3 0 M A Misty, then clouded.
16 21 45 23 52 127 27 13 1.0 13 F CI Clear.
16-17 23 00 00 09 69 19 17 1.0 17 G E Clear.
22-23 22 29 00 29 120 30 18 1.0 18 G E Clear.
23 03 07 04 45 98 30 18 1.0 18 M A Clear.
24 02 37 04 37 120 44 22 0.9 24 M A Fog ¼ time.
24-25 22 30 00 16 106 27 15 0.9 17 F CI Few passing clouds.
25 02 35 04 44 123 60 30 1.0 30 M A Clear.
29 02 31 04 41 130 73 34 1.0 34 M A Clear.
Oct. 17 02 20 02 54 34 11 19 0.9 21 M A Misty.
20 02 05 03 50 105 46 26 0.9 29 M A Misty cloud.
21 02 00 03 28 88 44 30 1.0 30 M A Clear.
1937
May 28 17 53 19 08 75 14 11 0.6 18 G C Intermittent watch; cloud.
29 18 42 20 04 82 16 12 0.7 17 G C Passing cloud.
30 18 23 20 25 122 14 G C Considerable cloud.
31 20 10 21 40 90 19 12 0.9 13 G C Slight cloud.
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June 1 19 50 22 10 140 23 8 0.8 10 G C Passing cloud.
2 18 37 23 05 268 47 10 0.9 11 G C Passing cloud.
3-4 20 00 00 15 255 56 12 0.9 13 G C Passing cloud.
4 20 00 23 55 235 45 12 0.8 15 G C Passing cloud.
5-6 21 30 01 00 210 53 14 0.8 17 G C Passing cloud.
9 00 10 03 10 180 53 18 0.9 20 G C Passing cloud.
13-14 23 00 00 25 85 26 18 1.0 18 G Ap Clear.
June 14–15 22 15 00 35 140 35 15 0.9 17 G Ap Clear.
July 28 20 33 21 40 67 7 6 0.2 G SH Through cloud gape.
1938
Feb. 9 02 53 03 53 00 13 13 1.0 13 M A Clear.
Mar. 2 02 00 03 30 90 14 9 1.0 9 M A Clear.
9 01 57 02 15 18 4 13 M A Clear.
May 7 00 25 02 55 150 27 10 1.0 10 F Td Clear.
7 03 15 05 00 105 27 15 1.0 15 F Td Clear.
8 02 40 04 50 130 41 19 1.0 19 M A Clear.
June 3 02 42 03 52 70 13 12 1.0 12 M A Clear.
Oct. 19 01 50 02 00 10 2 M A Clear, then clouded.
20 01 50 02 00 10 2 M A Clear, then clouded.
Dec. 17–18 23 15 01 50 155 18 7 0.8 9 B W Some cloud.

In the column “Observer” the various observers are denoted as follows: Bateson (B), Fairbrother (F), Geddes (G), and McIntosh (M). The observing stations also are abbreviated: Auckland (A), Apia, Samoa (Ap), Canton Island, N.Z. Solar Eclipse Expedition's site (C), Chatham Island (CI), Ermedale, Southland (E), New Plymouth, Taranaki (NP), Otekura, Southland (O). South Hillend, Southland (SH), Tadmor, Nelson (T), Taradale, Hawke's Bay (Td), Wellington (W).

The list of radiants which follows is in the same form as that used in the previous reports, being arranged in order of date (irrespective of year), at least four meteors observed on one night and intersecting within a circle 2 degrees in diameter, or five meteors on adjacent nights, or one stationary meteor, being required to form a radiant.

Criticism has been levelled at the number of radiants in earlier reports based on very few meteors. The Director is reluctant to abandon these, in a practically virgin field such as we are working in. Some consolation can be derived from the fact that 75 per cent, of the present list find confirmation in other radiants observed in New Zealand or elsewhere, which is indicated by naming the radiant in the “Remarks” column. Actually a portion of any radiant list must be erroneous, and the same faith cannot be placed in a list such as the present one as can be given to the Index Catalogue previously mentioned.

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List OF Radiant Points Observed.
No. Date G.M.T. Radiant R.A. Dec. o Mets. Wt. Obs. L. o Remarks.
846 1935 Jan. 29.47 120.0 —63.8 G G 219.3
847 " " " 126.7 —15.0 4 G G "
848 " " " 144.7 —23.0 4 G G " Inc. 2 stationary
849 " " " 147.0 —57.0 4 G G " NZ 853.
850 " " " 167.5 —42.0 8 G G "
851 " " " 189.0 —35.5 5 G G " NZ 611.
852 1935 Feb. 1-3c 206.0 —44.0 8 F F 222.3 Diffuse. Mu Cen.
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853 1935 Feb. 3.57 144.5 —56.7 4/7 G F 223.3 1 meteor Feb. 2. NZ 849; [BAA 153.
854 1936 Feb. 26.51 242.0 —45.3 6 G G 245.9
855 1938 Mar. 1.63 180.0 — 18.5 5 G M 249.7 Eta Cra.
856 1935 Apl. 3.66 190.0 — 6.0 F M 282.1 D. 147, 3.
857 " " " 241.0 —241.5 G M "
858 " " " 279.3 —34.5 4 G M " Delta Sgr.
859 " " " 294 — 9 4/6 F M " Comet Sehaumasse.
860 1935 Apl. 12-13c 235.0 —34.5 4 G F 291.0 NZ 269.
861 " " " 253.0 —53.5 4/6 F F " Beta Ara.
862 " " " 282.5 — 17.3 5 G F " D. 226, 3.
863 1936 Apl. 17.37 201.5 —28.0 4 G G 296.3 — Vir.
864 1936 Apl. 25.44 200.0 — 15.5 G F 304.1 ? Alpha Vir.
865 " " " 201.0 —27.5 ¾ G F " — Vir.
866 1936 Apl. 27.67 256.7 —20.3 ¾ F G 306.3 1 meteor Apl. 26. NZ 632.
867 " " " 310.0 — 31.5 5/7 G G " ? NZ 666.
868 " " " 333.5 —29.7 6 G G " ? NZ 663. Zeta PsA.
869 1935 Apl. 30.63 280.5 —64.0 G G 303.5
870 " " " 299.5 —53.0 4 G G "
871 1935 May 3.66 262 —24 5 F F 311.5
872 " " " 284.5 —22.0 F F " NZ 633, 639b.
873 " " " 340 —3 ¾ P F "
874 1935 May 3.67 335.0 — 2.0 13 G M 311.5 Eta Aqr.
875 1935 May 5.64 251.0 —33.0 5 G F 313.5
876 " " " 336.5 — 1.0 10 G F " Eta Aqr.
877 1935 May 5.67 279.5 —43.8 ¾ G M "
878 " " " 292.5 + 2.0 4 G M " NZ 347; D. 230, 5.
879 " " " 336.5 — 0.6 12 G M " Eta Aqr.
880 1938 May 6.63 319.5 — 10.0 G F 314.8
881 " " " 321.0 + 6.0 ¾ G F "
882 " " " 338.0 — 2.0 9 G F " Eta Aqr.
883 1935 May 6.69 239.0 —34.8 G M 314.5 — Scr.
884 " " " 307.0 +11.5 4 G M " 1 meteor May 5. D. 236, 4.
885 " " " 338.0 0.0 32 G M " Eta Aqr.
886 1938 May 7.68 337.5 — 1.0 21 G M 315.8 Eta Aqr.
887 1935 May 7.69 268.0 —11.5 ¾ F M 315.5
888 " " " 339.0 + 0.5 27 G M " Eta Aqr.
889 1935 May 7-8c 325.0 — 19.0 G M 315.9 Gamma Cap.
890 1935 May 8.73 340.0 + 1.0 14 G M 316.4 Eta Aqr.
891 1935 May 30.50 245.5 —36.0 4/6 F G 337 8 NZ 688.
892 " " " 283.7 —43.0 4 G G "
893 " " " 285.0 —18.0 G G " U Sgr.
894 " " " 336.5 — 65.5 2 G G " Inc. 1 stationary.
895 1937 May 31.39 234.5 + 2.5 4 G G 339.0 ? Mb Ser. ii.
896 " " " 240.0 —24.3 5 G G " Omega 2 Scr.
897 1937 June 1.40 267.5 —21.3 6 F G 340.0 2 meteors May 31. 4 Sgr.
898 1935 June 1.61 330.3 —21.5 4 F F 339.6 Poor in dec.
899 " " " 336.4 —37.5 5 G F " NZ 930?
900 1937 June 2.39 244.5 —29.6 5 G G 341.0 1 meteor June 1. 13 Scr.
901 " " " 232.5 —14.0 10 G G " 1 meteor June 1. Xi Oph.
902 " " " 254.5 + 14.8 6 G G " 2 meteors June 1.
903 " " " 269.0 —33.5 4/6 F G " Delta Sgr. ii.
904 " " " 269.5 —22.5 4/7 G G " ? Phi Sgr.
905 " " " 284.0 —29.0 5 F G " 3 meteors June 1. Lambda [Sgr. i.
906 1937 June 3.44 210.0 —26.5 6 F G 341.9
907 " " " 227.7 + 10.7 4/6 P G "
908 " " " 239.0 —12.7 6 G G " Omega 2 Ser.?
909 " " " 253.5 —27.5 0 G G " ? Xi Oph. ii.
910 " " " 262.3 —11.0 4 G G " Omicron Ser. i.
911 " " " 269.0 —32.5 6 a G " Delta Sgr. ii.
912 " " " 293.5 —32.7 3 G G " Meteors close to rad.
913 1937 June 4.44 244.5 —28.4 5 G G 342.8 2 meteors June 3. 13 Scr.
914 " " " 248.5 —23.0 4 P G " Omega 2 Scr.
– 399 –

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915 " " " 258 —27 4 G G " Xi Oph. ii.
916 " " " 271.5 —32.0 6/7 G G " Delta Sgr. ii.
917 " " " 284.0 —19.0 4 P G " U Sgr.
918 " " " 296.0 —26.5 5 G G " Omega Sgr.
919 1937 June 5.49 230.0 —37.6 6 G G 343.8
920 " " " 245.5 —12.5 ¾ P G " Omega 2 Scr.
921 " " " 250.5 —52.0 G G " ? Rho 2 Ara ii.
922 " " " 267.3 —11.4 F G " Omicron Ser. i.
923 " " " 272.0 —47.5 5 G G "
924 1935 June 7.63 267.5 —24.5 4 F G 345.4 ? Phi Sgr.
925 " " " 290.0 —25.0 4 G G " Omega Sgr.
926 " " " 326.0 —42.5 4/6 G G "
927 1937 June 8.59 296.5 —21.3 9 G G 346.8 Inc. 1 stat'n'ry. Omega Sgr.
928 " " " 310.0 — 9.0 4 P G "
929 " " " 33 323.0 —20.5 G G "
930 " " " 335.5 —32.0 4 G G " NZ 899?
931 1937 June 13.51 279.5 —21.0 P G 351.7 Diffuse. Lambda Sgr. ii.
932 " " " 286.5 —17.5 5 G G " ? Rho 1 Sgr.
933 " " " 294.0 + 4.0 4 G G " NZ 937; D. 230, 7.
934 1937 June 14.50 266.0 —13.0 8 G G 352.7 Omicron Ser. i.
935 " " " 283.5 —21.5 6 G G " Lambda Sgr. i.
936 " " " 295.0 —36.5 G G " — Sgr.
937 " " " 296.0 +4.0 4 G G " NZ 933; D. 230, 7.
938 1937 June 16.52 57.0 —64.0 1 G G 354.8 Stationary meteor.
939 " " " 256.0 —45.3 G G "
940 " " " 263.0 —33.5 4/6 F G " Lambda Scr.
941 " 1936 " " 290.0 —26.5 4 G G " Chi 1 Sgr.
942 1937 June 21.49 273.0 —34.0 6/7 G G 359.7 ? Lambda Sgr. iii.
943 " " " 297.0 —35.0 5 G G " — Sgr.
944 1935 July 3.67 312.3 —10.5 ¾ F M 10.8 Tau 2 Cap.
945 1937 July 5.67 322.0 —17.5 ¾ F M 12.8 Iota Aqr.
946 " " " 338.0 —61.0 4 G M "
947 1937 July 6.59 284.0 —26.0 4 F F 13.7 Psi Sgr. ii.
948 " " " 302.7 —10.5 5 G F " — Aql (S.I.C. 237).
949 " " " 310.5 — 4.5 ¾ G F " ? Alpha Cap. i.
950 " " " 336.0 —33.5 5 G F " — PsA (S.I.C. 282).
951 1935 July 10.69 331.5 —32.5 7/9 G M 17.6 Mu PsA
952 1935 July 11.69 332.0 —31.5 12 G M 18.6 Mu PsA
953 1936 July 16.47 298.7 —24.2 5 G F 23.9 53 Sgr.
954 1937 July 22.47 307.6 —30.0 4/6 G G 29.8 ? — Cap. (S.I.C. 250).
955 " " " 317.0 —23.0 4 G G " Eta Cap.
956 1936 July 22.69 321.7 — 4.3 G M 30.0 — Aqr. (S.I.C. 262).
957 " " " 342.3 —32.4 G M " Alpha PsA.
958 " " " 347.6 + 4.0 ¾ F M " D. 268, 5.
959 1936 July 23.67 23.0 —30.0 G M 31.0 Inc. 1 meteor July 24.
960 " " " 267.0 —04.4 G M " 2 meteors close rad.
961 " " " 338.5 —32.0 0/7 G M " 3 meteors July 24. Beta [PsA. ii.
962 1936 July 24.67 33.8 + 7.7 4 G M 32.0
963 " " " 309.0 — 9.5 ¾ G M " Beta Cap. ii.
964 " " " 325.0 —24.0 ¾ P M " — PsA. (S.I.C. 266).
965 " " " 330.0 —16.5 6/8 G M " 2 meteors July 23. Iota [Aqr. ii.
966 " " " 338.4 —17.1 G M " Delta Aqr.
967 " " " 351.5 —11.5 6/7 G M " Beta Cet. iv.
968 1935 July 26.68 339.3 —17.3 9 G M 33.0 Delta Aqr.
969 1935 July 27.66 311.5 —10.0 ¾ P M 34.0 Beta Cap. ii.
970 " " " 340.0 —17.0 15 G M " Delta Aqr.
971 1935 July 27.57 314.5 —20.5 G F 33.9 Eta Cap.
972 " " " 337.0 — 9.0 5 G F " Doubtful. 70 Aqr.
973 " " " 342.7 —18.0 4 F F " Delta Aqr.
974 " " " 343 —32 P F " Diffuse. Alpha PsA.
975 1935 July 28.59 24 —65 F G 34.9
976 " " " 330.0 —19.5 6 G G " Iota Aqr. ii.
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977 " " " 342.0 —17.0 12 P G " Diffuse. Delta Aqr.
978 " " " 343.0 —31.0 17 G G " Diffuse. Alpha PsA.
979 1930 July 28.67 15.0 —50.0 G M 35.9
980 " " " 31.5 —49.5 ¾ F M "
981 " " " 319.8 —20.7 3/6 F M " Eta Cap.
982 " " " 339.0 —17.0 14 G M " Delta Aqr.
983 " " " 346.0 —58.0 7 F M " Gamma Tuc.
984 1935 July 30.55 343.5 —15.0 12 F F 36.8 Diffuse. Delta Aqr.
985 1935 July 31.66 9.0 —19.0 5/7 F G 37.9 Beta Cet. iii.
986 " " " 20.0 + 5.0 5 G G " D. 19, 1.
987 " " 31.66" 33.0 —31.0 4 G G " — Phe (S.I.C. 22).
988 " " " 342.7 —15.5 20 G G " Delta Aqr.
989 " " " 344.0 —29.5 8 P G " Alpha PsA.
990 1935 July 31.67 34.0 — 2.5 0/8 G M 37.9 75 Cet.
991 " " " 50.0 —34.0 4 F M " — For. (S.I.C. 30).
992 " " " 344.0 —15.0 6/8 G M " Delta Aqr.
993 " " " 352.0 —15.5 5 G M " Beta Cet. iv.
994 1935 Aug. 2.40 344.0 —15.0 4 P F 39.7 ? Delta Aqr.
995 1935 Aug. 2.62 6.5 —19.5 7 P G 39.8 Beta Cet. iii.
996 " " " 45.0 —09.0 8 G G "
997 " " " 324.0 —17.5 5/0 G G " Delta Cap.
998 " " " 343.5 —30.5 11 G G " Alpha PsA.
999 " " " 346.5 —15.0 24 G G " Delta Aqr.
1000 1935 Aug. 2.67 39.0 —17.5 4 P M 39.9 Diffuse. Pi Cet.
1001 " " " 66.0 —30.0 ¾ P M " [Comet 1877. ii.
1002 " " " 303.0 —15.5 4 G M " ? Alpha Cap. ii.
1003 " " " 337.5 —29.0 5 F M " Diffuse. Alpha PsA.
1004 " " " 345.6 —15.0 8 G M " Delta Aqr.
1005 1935 Aug. 6.61 6.5 —28.5 5/0 G G 43.7 Alpha Scl.
1006 " " " 28.0 —29.5 4 G G "
1007 " " " 332.0 —32.0 4/6 G G " ? Alpha PsA.
1008 " " " 351.0 — 4.5 4 G G " 14 Psc.
1009 1935 Aug. 30.59 13-5 — 9.5 4 G F 67.1 1 meteor Aug. 31. 21 Cet.
1010 " " " 339.0 — 5.5 5 G F " Ditto. ? Zeta Aqr. ii.
1011 1935 Aug. 31.56 5.0 — 4.3 4 G F 68.1 Cet.
1012 1935 Sept. 1-2c 13.5 — 9.5 G F 69.6 21 Cet.
1013 " " " 16.5 —17.7 4 G F "
1014 " " " 27.0 — 5.0 G F "
1015 1936 Oct. 19.64 80.0 + 17.5 ¾ F M 116.9 D. 69, 11.
1016 " " " 91.5 + 14.6 13 G M " Ori.
1017 " " " 97.0 + 17.0 6 G M " D. 79, 6.
1018 1936 Oct. 20.63 92.6 + 14.5 22 G M 117.9 Ori.
1019 1935 Oct. 20.65 86.7 + 15.0 5/0 G M 117.1 Ori.
1020 1935 Nov. 20.57 132.0 —58.0 F F 153.8
1021 1938 Dec. 17.54 97.0 + 21.0 1 F B 175.3 Stationary meteor.

In the “Remarks” column, D refers to Denning's General Catalogue of Meteor Radiants, the first figures to the group, the final ones to the radiant number; BAA to the radiants of the British Astronomical Association; numbers with the initials NZ prefixed refer to radiants in reports of the Meteor Section already published, while S.I.C. refers to centres of radiation published in the Southern Index Catalogue. In all cases where the radiants are named, other radiants have been found confirming those now published.

The Director wishes to express his thanks to all the observer mentioned in this and preceding reports, by whose assistance the Meteor Section has accumulated an important mass of data, and look; forward to their continued co-operation in the future.

Private Observatory,

1 Melford Street, Auckland, W.I. 1939, Juno 24.