Go to National Library of New Zealand Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa
Volume 70, 1940-41
This text is also available in PDF
(23 MB) Opens in new window
– 321 –

Genus Proisotomurus Womersley.

Species that are allied to Isotomurus and Acanthomurus but in which the dentes are armed vetrally with a double row of simple spines each arising from a distinct papilla. This also is a genus which was erected for the reception of a single Australian species and which is represented in New Zealand by the Australian species together with two endemic species and a subspecies.

Key to the New Zealand Species of Proisotomurus.
1. Inner lamella of empodial appendage without tooth. Claw with no inner teeth. Colour yellow with lateral shading of purple. P. novae-zealandiae sp. nov.
Inner lamella of empodial appendage with tooth. 2
2. (a) Claw with suggestion of blunt inner basal tooth. Colour dark ochreous to greenish ochreous with continuous unbroken dark-brown dorsal stripe. P. lineatus sp. nov.
(b) As above except that dorsal stripe is P. lineatus discontinuous. subsp. violaceus nov.
Not as above. 3
3. Claw without any inner teeth, but with outer lateral basal teeth. Greenish-yellow species with irregular dark-brown markings all over. P. papillatus Womersley

Proisotomurus novae-zealandiae sp. nov. Plate 50, figs. 179–182.

Colour: Pale yellowish-brown with purple shading on dorsal and lateral aspects of Abd. V and Abd. VI around bases of antennae and along ventral edges of thoracic pleura. Legs darker brown with tarsi very dark, antennae dark brown, becoming purplish on distal half of Ant. IV.

Clothing: Evenly clothed with dark brown setae. A sigle long, fine, ciliated hair occurs dorsally on Abd. II and on Abd. IV, and on each side of Abd. III. Generally two long backward curved ciliated setae arising dorsally on Abd. V. Occasional long ciliated setae on Abdominal segments III to VI, and on legs. Ventral tube clothed with fine hairs.

Body: Length 1·6 mm. Head approximately equal to thorax in length. Tergum of mesothorax almost covers prothorax. Antennae four-segmented, the segments related as 7: 10: 11: 13, almost twice as long as head and with sensory organ consisting of two very small projecting rods on Ant. III. Ocelli eight to each side, all large and equal. Postantennal organ elliptical, about twice as long as diameter of adjacent ocellus and with a double outline. Ventral tube finger-like and clothed with fine hairs. Abd. III slightly longer than Abd. IV as 17: 13.

Legs: Claw with two outer lateral teeth, but no inner teeth. Empodial appendage about half as long as claw, sharply pointed or stylet-like with very broad inner lamella reaching half-way down and medium outer lamellae reaching to end of appendage. Two non-clavate short tenent hairs to each foot.

– 322 –

Furcula: Reaching to thorax, manubrium: mucrodens as 15: 33, dens with two rows of spines mounted on small papillae. Dens also corrugated and annulated. Mucro with apical tooth, small inner middle tooth, two smaller lateral basal teeth and one small outer sub-apical dorsal tooth.

Localities: On edge of warm swamp on shore of Lake Rotomahana, near the Waimangu River, amongst rushes; Lake Waikaremoana, among rushes on bog by edge of lake; Palliser Bay, among rushes on the coast.

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

Type: Slide 3/488, Dominion Museum Collection.

Proisotomurus lineatus sp. nov. Plate 50, figs. 177–178.

Colour: Ground colour of dark ochre which may vary to dark brown or greenish ochreous. A continuous line of dark brown along dorsal surface. Posterior portion of Abd. V and usually all Abd. VI violet. Dark pigment around and between bases of antennae, across back of head, and sometimes a dark patch on top of head. Generally, violet or greenish pigment along ventral edges of pleura and irregular pale patches on sides of abdomen. Antennae and legs usually darker in colour than rest of body, or sometimes greenish-brown. Antennae become very dark on Ant. IV; legs darker on tarsi. Furcula usually yellowish-brown.

Clothing: Body covered thickly with short simple setae and occasional longer ones. Some setae around tip of abdomen are ciliated. Fine ciliated sensory hairs on Abd. II dorsally, and on Abd. IV laterally. Legs and antennae heavily clothed with short setae and, on legs, occasional long ciliated setae.

Body: Length 2·2 mm. Antennae twice as long as head, four-segmented, the segments related as 11: 17: 19: 18: A sensory organ consisting of two short curved rods on Ant. III. Mesothoracic terga almost completely covers prothorax. Head approximately equal to thorax in length. Ocelli eight to each side, all large and on black pigment patches. Postantennal organ elliptical, equal to or longer than diameter of an ocellus, never less, and double outlined. Ventral tube long and swollen distally. Abd. III longer than Abd. IV as 27: 20.

Legs: Claw with a suggestion of blunt tooth near base on inner margin (not always present), and two lateral external teeth. Empodial appendage with broad inner and outer lamellae, inner with prominent blunt tooth at its widest part, and from one-third to three-quarters length of claw, sharply-pointed and truncate on inner margin. Two non-clavate short tenent hairs on each foot.

Furcula: Reaching to the ventral tube. Manubrium: mucrodens as 18: 34. Dens with two rows of long simple spines running its full length, each on prominent papilla. Mucro with prominent apical tooth, very prominent sub-apical tooth, smaller outer sub-apical dorsal tooth, and one lateral tooth.

– 323 –

Localities: Lake Waikaremoana, amongst rushes in a bog on the shore of the lake; Waioeka Valley, 2,000 ft., in grass; Akatarawa, in leaf debris in forest; Kelburn, Wellington, amongst grass of a lawn (collected by D. K. Ross); Newbury, Palmerston North, from rotten log (collected by D. K. Ross).

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

Type: Slide 3/475, Dominion Museum Collection.

Proisotomurus lineatus subsp. violaceus nov.

This variety differs from the typical form in that the dorsal line is not continuous and that there is a suffusion of pale violet pigment on the sides of the segments, more particularly those of the abdomen. The tarsi are bright violet and the bases of the legs pale violet. The femur is pale ochreous. The antennae are violet, becoming darker on the apical half of Ant. IV.

Locality: Akatarawa, amongst fallen beech leaves on the riverbank.

[The section below cannot be correctly rendered as it contains complex formatting. See the image of the page for a more accurate rendering.]

Type: Slide 3/487, Dominion Museum Collection.

Proisotomurus papillatus Womersley, 1934. Plate 50, figs. 183–184.

Colour: It is a greenish-yellow insect with irregular dark brown or purplish markings on sides and dorsal surface. Antennae greenish-brown, legs and furcula paler in colour.

Clothing: Thickly clothed with numerous long, simple setae, some of which, on legs, may be ciliated. Bothriotrichia on Abds. II-IV, but very short.

Body: Length up to 2·6 mm. Antennae about two and a-half times as long as head. Ant. I: II: III: IV as 5: 8: 8: 8 ½. Ant. III with two small sensory rods. Ocelli eight to each side with posterior inner two smaller than rest. Postantennal organ smaller than an ocellus and elongate elliptical. Abd. III and Abd. IV approximately equal in length.

Legs: Claw with outer lateral teeth at about one-fifth down, but without any inner teeth. Empodial appendage about half as long as claw with broad inner and narrow outer lamellae, inner with a small tooth at angle. No tenent hairs.

Furcula: Reaching forward to ventral tube. Manubrium: mucrodens as 5: 9. Dens with double row of long, slender spines, each arising from distinct papilla. Mucro with approximately equal apical and pre-apical teeth or the pre-apical slightly larger, small outer dorsal tooth and outer lateral tooth.

Locality: I have taken this Australian species on a recently dug-up lawn at Karori, Wellington, where it was very plentiful.