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Volume 76, 1946-47
– i –

Proceedings
of
the Royal Society of New Zealand

Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council, Held on 22nd May, 1946.

The Annual Meeting of the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand was held on Wednesday, 22nd May, 1946, in the Council Room, Victoria University College, Wellington.

The President, Professor W. N. Benson, presided over the meeting.

Roll Call: The following were present:–

  • The President, Professor W. N. Benson.

  • The Vice-President, Dr. P. Marshall.

  • Representing the Government: Mr. B. C. Aston, Dr. G. Archey, Dr. W. R. B. Oliver.

  • Representing Auckland Institute: Mr. A. T. Pycroft, Dr. L. H. Briggs.

  • Representing Wellington Branch: Professor L. R. Richardson, Dr. L. I. Grange.

  • Representing Canterbury Branch: Dr. R. A. Falla, Dr. O. H. Frankel.

  • Representing Otago Branch: Dr. C. M. Focken, Dr. H. D. Skinner.

  • Representing Hawke's Bay Branch: Mr. J. D. H. Buchanan.

  • Representing Nelson Institute: Dr. D. Miller.

  • Representing Southland Branch: Mr. R. W. Willett.

  • Co-opted Member: Dr. J. Marwick.

  • The Honorary Treasurer: Mr. S. Cory Wright.

An Apology was received from Dr. E. Marsden, who is in England in connection with the Empire Scientific Conference, at which he will represent the Society.

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Co-opted. Member: The Vice-President, Dr. Marshall, asked leave to introduce a matter of urgency and moved: “That Professor W. P. Evans, who had previously represented the Southland Branch on the Council and whose services there were invaluable, be co-opted under Clause 4 (ii) of ‘The Royal Society of New Zealand Act, 1933.’” Seconded by Mr. Aston and carried unanimously.

Welcome to New Members: The President extended a cordial welcome to Dr. L. H. Briggs, Dr. H. D. Skinner, Mr. J. D. H. Buchanan, and Mr. R. W. Willett, who took their seats on the Council for the first time.

Presidential Address: Professor W. N. Benson then delivered his Presidential Address, at the commencement of which he referred to the loss the Society had sustained during the past year by the death of three former members of the Council, the Rev. Dr. J. E. Holloway, F.R.S., a past President of the Society, Mr. G. V. Hudson, and Mr. M. A. Eliott, for many years Honorary Treasurer of the Society.

At the conclusion of the address the Vice-President moved a very hearty vote of thanks to the President for his inspiring address and asked that he allow it to be printed in the Transactions.

Motions of Appreciation: On the motion of Dr. Oliver, seconded by Dr. Focken, the following resolution was carried:—

That the Royal Society places on record its deep regret at the great loss sustained by the death of the Rev. Dr. J. E. Holloway, one-time President of the Society. By painstaking and accurate work he added very considerably to our knowledge of the life-histories of New Zealand Pteridophytes. Dr. Holloway's researches were of such a high standard as to place him in the front rank of the world's Pteridologists and earn for him election to Fellowship of the Royal Society of London. His quiet, unassuming nature endeared him to all who were fortunate enough to know him. The Council of the Royal Society extends to his family its sincere sympathy.

On the motion of Dr. Miller, seconded by Professor Richardson, it was resolved to place on record the loss sustained by the Society by the death of Mr. G. V. Hudson, its appreciation of the services rendered by him, and its recognition of his valuable entomological work. His published books and papers were the results of intensive researches in entomology and made him a recognised authority.

On the motion of Dr. Marshall, seconded by Mr. Aston, it was resolved that the Society place on record its deep regret at the death of Mr. M. A. Eliott, who for many years was Honorary Treasurer of the Society and representative of the Manawatu Philosophical Society on the Council until it went into recess; the Society places on record its apprecitaion of the services rendered by him and extends its sympathy to his relatives.

– iii –

The President expressed the Society's thanks and indebtedness to Professor H. W. Segar, who had resigned for health reasons, and to Dr. F. J. Turner, who had accepted an appointment in the University of California.

Hector Award: The Hector Award Committee (Dr. D. B. Macleod, Professor R. J. T. Bell, and Professor T. H. Laby) recommended that the Hector Medal and Prize be awarded to Professor H. G. Forder, Professor of Mathematics at Auckland University College, for his original contributions to the science of mathematics and especially for his treatise entitled “The Calculus of Extension.”

The Award Committee submitted a statement of procedure in arriving at its recommendation and this was taken in committee.

The Committee's recommendation was adopted.

Amount of Hector Prize: On the motion of Mr. S. Cory Wright, Honorary Treasurer, it was decided that the prize be-£50.

Honorary Returning Officer: On the motion of the President, Mr. A. T. Pycroft was appointed Honorary Returning Officer in place of Professor Segar (resigned).

Honorary Membership: Dr. C. M. Focken asked leave to make a statement regarding certain nominees for Honorary Membership, while Dr. Grange similarly referred to another nominee. There was one vacancy to be filled, and the voting resulted in Professor Niels Bohr being elected Honorary Member.

No Vacancies in the Honorary Membership were declared.

Member Bodies' Reports and Balance Sheets: The following reports and balance sheets were laid on the table:—

  • Auckland Institute for the year ended 31st March, 1945.

  • Wellington Branch for the year ended 30th September, 1945.

  • Canterbury Branch for the year ended 31st October, 1945.

  • Otago Branch for the year ended 31st October, 1945.

  • Nelson Institute for the year ended 31st Decemmber, 1945.

  • Southland Branch for the year ended 31st March, 1946.

  • Hawke's Bay Branch for the year ended 31st December, 1945.

Report of the Standing Committee: On the motion of Dr. Marshall, seconded by Dr. Marwick, the report of the Standing Committee was adopted.

Report of the Standing Committee for the Year ended 31st March, 1946.

Meetings: Six meetings of the Standing Committee were held during the year, the attendance being as follows:—The President, Professor W. N. Benson, Dunedin, 1; the Vice-President, Dr P. Marshall, Wellington, 6; Mr. B. C. Aston, Wellington, 5; Professor W. P. Evans, Wellington, 6; Dr. L. I. Grange, Wellington, 5; Mr. G. V. Hudson, Wellington, 5; Dr. E. Marsden, Wellington, 3; Dr. J. Marwick, Wellington, 5; Dr. W. R. B. Oliver, Wellington, 6; Professor L. R. Richardson, Wellington, 6; Dr. O. H. Frankel, Christchurch, 1; the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. S. Cory-Wright, Wellington, 2.

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Council: It is with deep regret that the death of Mr. G. V. Hudson is recorded. At the last meeting of the Standing Committee the Vice-President, Dr. P. Marshall, referred to the loss the Society had sustained by the sudden death of Mr. Hudson, and paid a tribute to his work and the service he had rendered while a member of the Council. Other members also paid tribute to Mr. Hudson's work.

It is also with deep regret that the death of the Rev. Dr. J. E. Holloway, a past President and member of the Council, is recorded. Dr. R. A. Falla represented the Society at the funeral of Dr. Holloway in Christchurch.

Publications: Two sets of Maori Art bound in brown buckram and one unbound set, three copies of the late Mr. Hudson's book New Zealand Beetles, and several partial sets of Transactions were sold during the year.

Volume 74, Part 4, and Volume 75, Parts 1, 2, and 3, of the Transactions were published, and Part 4 is in the press. The first paper of the Cockayne Memorial Volume was published in Part 2 of Volume 75. This is a paper of 57 pages by Mr. George Simpson, entitled “A Revision of the Genus Carmichaelia. Two hundred and fifty copies of the paper have been set aside for binding in the Cockayne Memorial Volume, the cost of the paper being a charge on the Cockayne Memorial Fund.

At a meeting of the Standing Committee on 23rd August the following resolution was carried: “That the last two years' interest in the Endowment Fund and that for the current year be allocated for publication expenses.”

Honorary Editor: At a meeting of the Standing Committee held on the 13th February, Dr. J. Marwick tendered his resignation as Hon. Editor of the Transactions on account of pressure of his geological work.

Dr. Marshall stated that Dr. Marwick's resignation was received with great regret, as he had done excellent work as Honorary Editor over a long period, and his services had been much appreciated by the Society.

On the recommendation of Dr. Marwick, Dr. J. Henderson was appointed Honorary Editor, and Dr. Henderson subsequently accepted this appointment.

Library: Good use has been made of the Library during the past year, and the inter-loan facilities have been much in demand.

Exchanges: With the cessation of the war and the lifting of the postal ban, twenty-two institutions in neutral countries have already resumed sending their publications to the Library, and the volumes of Transactions which had accumulated during the war period have in return been posted to these exchanges.

Postal communication for second-class matter has now been restored between New Zealand and all countries except Germany, Austria, Japan, Netherlands East Indies, and French Indo-China. Early in February a circular was sent to all institutions on the Exchange List except to the above countries asking if they were in a position to resume exchange relations. Replies are now being received, and in addition a number of other institutions is applying to be placed on the Exchange List. These will be considered by the Library Committee at an early date.

Annual Grant: At a meeting of the Standing Committee on the 24th August, Dr. Marsden reported that £750 was on the Estimates for the current year, and that no increase in the grant had been provided for. He raised the question of the present status of the Royal Society of New Zealand, expressing the opinion that the restricted scope of its scientific work adversely influenced its claim for recognition in the matter of a large increase in its grant.

This matter was given consideration at a subsequent meeting of the Standing Committee, when ways and means of making the Society representative of all science including medicine, chemistry, and engineering were discussed. As one method, it was decided that a circular describing the nature, scope, and status of the Transactions be transmitted to all New Zealand scientific bodies advising of the opportunity for publication in the Transactions of papers of fundamental significance. As a further measure, it was decided that the question of direct representation of the Fellows on the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand be referred to the Annual Meeting for consideration.

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Member Bodies: Annual reports and balance sheets have been received from the following Member Bodies:—

  • Auckland Institute for the year ended 31st March, 1945.

  • Wellington Branch for the year ended 30th September, 1945.

  • Canterbury Branch for the year ended 31st October, 1945.

  • Otago Branch for the year ended 31st October, 1945.

  • Nelson Institute for the year ended 31st December, 1945.

The above balance sheets have been submitted to the Honorary Treasurer for report.

The Hawke's Bay Branch has made, during the year, a determined effort to revive interest in its activities, and a number of new members has been enrolled.

With the transfer to Hamilton of the Chemistry Division of the Department of Agriculture and an increased staff at Ruakura Animal Research Station, tentative inquiries were received regarding the formation of a branch of the Royal Society in the Waikato. So far nothing definite appears to have resulted.

Fellowship: On the 19th July, 1945, Dr. C. O. Hutton was gazetted a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

There were no vacancies in the Fellowship for the year 1945–46.

In accordance with a resolution of the last Annual Meeting, the proposals submitted by the Otago Branch regarding the rules governing the Fellowship were circulated to all Fellows, who were asked to meet together in their various centres to discuss the proposals. The reports of these meetings were summarised and submitted by the Vice-President to a meeting of the Standing Committee and referred to the Annual Meeting. The report is appended.

The Annual Meeting also requested the Standing Committee to prepare a census of scientific workers in the Dominion. Steps to do this were taken by asking the Branches to forward the names, qualifications, and subjects of study of scientific workers in their membership. One Branch complied with the request very thoroughly by having a printed card questionnaire sent to its members, with the result that a practically complete record has been obtained from that Branch. Three other Branches responded with more or less complete information, but there are three Branches which, despite repeated requests, have so far not sent in their returns. The compilation, therefore, has been delayed in the hope that these Branches will enable it to be a complete census.

Hector Award: The Hector Medal and Prize were presented to Dr. J. Henderson at a meeting of the Wellington Branch on the 27th June. In the absence of the President, Dr. Marshall made the presentation.

Dr. E. Marsden, who had been appointed to act on the Hector Award Committee, stated that he would be unable to act, and Dr. D. B. Macleod was appointed in his place.

Hutton Grants: The following applications for Hutton Grants were considered by the Standing Committee and recommended for approval by the Annual Meeting:—Mrs. E. A. Hodgson, £5, for the purchase of two books on Hepaticae. Mr. J. B. Mackie, £30, for research on the regional structure of the schists of Northern and Central Otago. Mr. D. W. McKenzie, £44, for aerial photographs in connection with a geographic study of Wellington. Mr. R. J. McLaughlan, £30, for geological work on the Haurangi Range area in the eastern portion of Wellington Province. Mr. Te Punga, £30, for work in connection with geological aspects of palaeo-botany and petrography.

Research Grants: On the 30th May the Standing Committee approved an application from Dr. L. H. Briggs, of Auckland University College, for a research grant of £60 for the purchase of a Hydrophil Balance.

T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Fund: At the last Annual Meeting a resolution was carried instructing the Standing Committee to obtain legal opinion as to whether certain changes proposed by the Otago Branch could be made in the Declaration of Trust and Rules governing the T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Award.

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Accordingly, Dr. Marsden, Secretary of the Scientific and Industrial Research Department, was asked to approach the Solicitor-General for an opinion on the matter. On the 23rd August the Crown Solicitor's opinion was considered and the following extract summarises the position:—“Short of special legislation, there is, in my opinion, no way of making the desired alteration … There is no such difficulty in administering the Trust as it stands as would justify the Supreme Court in decreeing an altered scheme under ‘The Religious Charitable and Educational Trusts Act, 1908.’ No failure of available purposes could be suggested that would justify the Supreme Court in exercising its equitable jurisdiction to vary, a trust.”

It was agreed that in view of the Crown Solicitor's opinion the Standing Committee could take no further action.

Honorary Membership: For the vacancy occurring in the list of Honorary Members four nominations have been received from Member Bodies. The election will be held at the Annual Meeting.

Science Congress: The Wellington Branch intimated to the Standing Committee at its November meeting that it was willing to organise a Science Congress in Wellington in 1946. The Standing Committee advised that in view of the A. and N.Z.A.A.S. meeting in 1946 and the fact that it is customary to give a year's notice of intention to hold a Science Congress, and also of the difficulties still prevailing regarding transport and accommodation, the Science Congress be deferred until 1947. The Wellington Branch agreed to organise the Science Congress in 1947.

Dominion Museum: The Standing Committee endeavoured to carry out the request of the Annual Meeting to obtain an interview with the Prime Minister in an endeavour to have the Dominion Museum building returned to its normal functions, but owing to his absence from the Dominion this was not possible. The Acting Prime Minister wrote in reply to the Society's representations that it was not then possible for the Air Force to vacate the Dominion Museum building, but he gave an assurance that the position was being kept under close observation. Later, a further attempt was made to reach some finality, but at the last meeting of the Standing Committee the Director of the Museum reported that while some of the Forces were vacating certain rooms, other Forces were being moved into the building. The Wellington Branch again wrote drawing attention to the unsatisfactory position, and the matter was again referred to the Annual Meeting for further action.

Museum Management Committee: The resignation of Professor Kirk as one of the Society's representatives on the Management Committee was received with regret, and Professor L. R. Richardson was appointed to fill the vacancy.

Dr. H. H. Allan wrote stating that as he was no longer a member of the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand, he felt he should resign from representing that body on the Management Committee. The Standing Committee asked Dr. Allan to continue to act on the Committee, and he agreed to do so.

Empire Science Congress: An invitation was received from the Royal Society of London to an Empire Science Congress to be held in London in June, 1946. Dr. E. Marsden, who is representing his Department at the Congress, was appointed to represent the Society.

Isaac Newton Tercentenary: The Tercentenary celebrations of Isaac Newton's birth are being held immediately following the Empire Science Congress, and Dr. Marsden was asked to represent the Society.

International Council of Scientific Unions: This Council has been revived since the end of the war and intends to hold its General Assembly in London on July 22–24, and as the adhering body in New Zealand, the Royal Society of New Zealand was invited to send a representative.

It was decided to appoint Sir Theodore Rigg to represent the Society, and he has agreed to do so.

President and Vice-President: The Wellington Branch gave notice on the 24th July that it proposed to bring before the Annual Meeting rules for the election of President and Vice-President of the Society.

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On the 26th June the Canterbury Branch forwarded a copy of a resolution: “That the Standing Committee be asked to review the position with a view to having the rules amended so that the retiring President may remain on the Council.” As the Standing Committee has no power to alter the rules, Dr. Frankel was asked to bring the matter before the Annual Meeting.

Presidential Addresses: On the 14th February, 1946, the Wellington Branch wrote: “With regard to the Presidential Address given to the Annual Meeting of the Royal Society each year, it has long been felt by members of this Branch that this important address should receive more publicity and a wider audience than it normally receives as at present delivered to the members of the Council. The Council of this Branch resolved, therefore, to formally request that the Presidential Address be delivered before a full meeting of this Branch on the most suitable evening during the session of the Annual Meeting of the Royal Society of New Zealand.”

The Standing Committee replied that it could take no action this year, and referred the matter to the Annual Meeting for consideration.

Scientific Education: The following resolution of the Annual Meeting was sent to the Hon. Minister of Education: “That the Council of the Royal Society recommends, in view of the increased impact of science on society and the economic life of the community in New Zealand, that a Royal Commission be set up to investigate and report on the whole question of scientific education in New Zealand.”

The Minister replied, asking the Society to state the grounds on which its request for a Royal Commission is based.

Professor Richardon submitted a statement in support of the resolution as far as the teaching of biology was concerned, and a sub-committee consisting of Professor Richardson, Dr. Marsden, Dr. Frankel, Mr. D. W. McKenzie, and Mr. A. D. Monro was set up to submit comprehensive data as requested by the Minister. So far this Committee has not been able to accomplish this in full.

Adult Education: In an endeavour to carry out the instruction of the Annual Meeting, a sub-committee consisting of Mr. D. W. McKenzie (Convener), Mr. H. C. McQueen, Mr. J. T. Salmon, Mr. N. H. Taylor, Dr. J. K. Dixon, Dr. G. Archey, Dr. O. H. Frankel, and Dr. F. J. Turner was set up to consult with the Council of Adult Education on the part the Royal Society may play in the development of adult education. This committee has not yet reported any action.

Wild Life Control: As soon as the Prime Minister returned to New Zealand in July, 1945, the Wild Life Control Committee's Report on Wild Life Administration submitted to the last Annual Meeting was sent to him for his consideration, and he was asked to receive a deputation. So far, no reply has been received.

The attention of the Standing Committee was directed to a published statement that the Department of Internal Affairs was taking over the Southern Lakes with the intention of stocking them with trout ova from the Rotorua District. Fear of the elimination of native fresh-water life through this action was expressed. The Standing Committee agreed that a deputation consisting of Professor Richardson, Mr. J. T. Salmon, and others if necessary should wait on the Minister of Internal Affairs.

The deputation consisting of Professor Richardson, Dr. Oliver, and Messrs. J. T. Salmon, V. D. Zotov, and A. J. Healy waited on the Hon. Minister and was sympathetically received.

Subsequently the Minister wrote: “… Regarding the reservation of the western watershed area of the Fiordland National Park from the introduction of any exotic animal and plant life, I have to advise that a direction has recently been sent to the Conservator of Fish and Game, Queenstown, that no liberations or plantings of any forms of animal or vegetable life, including trout and other fish, are to be made in any waters of the Southern Lakes Acclimatisation district in which such forms of life are not already established, without prior specific authority …”.

– viii –

The matter of the extermination of goats on Great Island was taken up with the Minister of Internal Affairs by Mr. A. W. B. Powell, of the Auckland Museum, who had recently visited the island, and the Society was notified of his action. The matter was referred to the Wild Life Control Committee for any further action that it considered necessary.

Cape Expedition Scientific Collections: Dr. J. Marwick was appointed to represent the Society on the committee set up to deal with the descriptions, publications, and disposal of collections of specimens made at the Auckland and Campbell Islands under the supervision of Dr. R. A. Falla.

Transit of Venus Site: The notice of the Standing Committee was directed to the fact that the small area of land at Queenstown acquired by the Government to mark the site from which observations of the transit of Venus had been made in 1874 and 1882 had been allowed to become overrun with weeds and the adjoining owner had made an offer to purchase the area. It was decided to suggest that the Government erect a small monument and tablet on the actual site of the observations to preserve the historical significance of the occasion, the cost being defrayed from the proceeds of the sale of the remainder of the area.

Arising therefrom:—

Presidential Addresses: The representatives of the Wellington Branch moved that the Presidential Addresses be delivered each year before a full meeting of the Wellington Branch during the session of the Annual Meeting of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

After some discussion, the following amendment moved by Dr. Archey and seconded by Dr. Frankel was carried:—

That it be a recommendation to the Standing Committee that it should arrange for the delivery of an address by the President at a meeting of the Branch in the town in which the Annual Meeting is being held.

Hon. Minister of Scientific and Industrial Research: At this juncture the Hon. Mr. Sullivan, Minister of Scientific and Industrial Research, attended the meeting and was welcomed by the President and Vice-President. Mr. Sullivan thanked the Council for its invitation to be present at its Annual Meeting, stating that he felt a special pleasure in accepting that invitation, as it afforded him an opportunity on behalf of the Government to thank New Zealand scientists for the notable part which they had played during World War II, which ceased less than twelve months ago. He considered he could best express the Government's feelings of gratitude and appreciation through the Royal Society of New Zealand, which is representative of every branch of scientific activity and thought. He then went on to trace the Society's record of service and achievement through its scientists from 1867 to the present time.

The Minister was warmly applauded for his address, and he then retired from the meeting.

Fellowship: Dr. Marshall introduced the following report on the Fellowship rules, which had been considered by the Fellows, stating that the only rule which it was considered should be altered was that governing the total number of Fellows to be elected:—

– ix –

Fellowship of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

The following proposed amendments or additions to the Rules governing the Fellowship of the Royal Society of New Zealand were submitted by the Otago Branch to the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand at the Annual Meeting held in May, 1945, and later provided the basis of discussion at meetings of Fellows held in the four centres:—

1.

That in future the Fellowship be awarded independently in each of the four groups of subjects, namely:—

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Group. Subject. Present No. of Fellows. Proposed No. of Fellows.
I. Agriculture
Botany 6 25 28
Geology 12
Zoology 7
II. Chemistry 8
Biochemistry
Physiology — 8 14
Public Health & Medicine
Allied Branches of Science
III Physics 2
Mathematics 1
Astronomy
Seismology — 3 12
Geophysics
Engineering
Allied Exact Sciences
IV. Anthropology 3
Psychology
Economics — 3 6
Geography
Other Social Sciences
39 60

That the maximum number of Fellows for each group be fixed.

2.

That the number of Fellows elected in any year should not exceed six, and that the number of vacancies in each group to be filled by election in any year be decided and declared at the preceding Annual Meeting of the Council.

3.

That the Selection Committee shall have power to co-opt three additional members after receiving the list of nominees. Further, that preliminary voting on the nominees for each group shall be carried out by the present Fellows within the group in question.

4.

That some reference to the motion, “That the Council recommend Member Bodies, Fellows, and the Fellowship Selection Committee to take into account whether the research work of the nominee for Fellowship is done in professional or amateur capacity (Trans. R.S.N.Z., Vol. 72, p. xx), be included in the rules governing the award of the Fellowship.

5.

That no discrimination be made between nominees the bulk of whose research work has been done in New Zealand, and those who, being actively engaged in research in New Zealand, have carried out the major part of their work elsewhere, subject to the residential qualification set out in Rule 5 (Trans. R.S.N.Z., Vol. 65, p. 493).

6.

That each Member Body be entitled to nominate as many persons for the Fellowship as there are vacancies.

7.

That the Standing Committee draft the necessary amendments to the existing rules governing the award of the Fellowship, circulate the draft to Councils of Member Bodies, and submit the amended rules to the Annual Meeting in 1946.

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The reports of the four meetings of Fellows were summarised by the Vice-President, Dr. Marshall, submitted to the Standing Committee, and referred to the Annual Meeting for consideration.

Otago Fellows supported all the proposed alterations with the following exceptions:—

No. 2 should read “That the number of Fellows elected in any year should not exceed four, except in exceptional circumstances.”

No. 3, the words “not more than” be added after “co-opt.”

An additional suggestion, “That at the time of his election every Fellow should be a member of the Royal Society of New Zealand” was also made.

Canterbury Fellows supported proposals No. 4 and No. 6.

Wellington Fellows supported the proposal to raise the number of Fellows from 40 to 60 and supported No. 2 and No. 6. They did not support Nos. 3, 4, or 5.

Auckland Fellows suggested that the number of Fellows be increased to 50 during the next 10 years and the position reviewed again in 1956, and that the proposed grouping in No. 1 be retained only as a guide. Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 were not supported.

It cannot be said that the result of these meetings is generally in favour of any special changes in the rules except in increasing the number of Fellows. The Canterbury meeting considered that the necessary reforms could be achieved by a more active concern on the part of the Member Bodies and care in making nominations.

After some discussion, Dr. Briggs moved and Dr. Marshall seconded: “That the number of Fellows be increased to fifty over a period of ten years.”

Professor Richardson moved an amendment, seconded by Dr. Marwick: “That the number of Fellows be increased to sixty.” This was lost.

A further amendment moved by Dr. Briggs, seconded by Dr. Archey: “That Rule 2 under G.I. be amended by deleting the word ‘forty’ and substituting therefor the word ‘fifty’ was carried.

Dr. Allan reported that the sub-committee (Dr. Allan, Dr. Archey, Dr. Turner) set up at last Annual Meeting to draft necessary amendments to the existing rules governing the Fellowship had been unable to meet. It was resolved that the sub-committee be reappointed with Professor Richardson replacing Dr. Turner, who had left New Zealand, and that Member Bodies be asked to submit by the 31st August information or suggestions regarding the rules.

On the motion of Dr. Archey, seconded by Dr. Falla, it was resolved: “That the Council draws the attention of Member Bodies and Fellows of the Society to the desirability of nominating for Fellowship workers in all branches of science and that in connection therewith attention be drawn to the list submitted by the Otago Branch.”

Number of Fellows to be Elected in 1947: On the motion of Dr. Archey, seconded by Dr. Frankel, it was resolved that four Fellows be elected in 1947.

On the motion of Dr. Falla, seconded by Dr. Frankel, it was resolved: “That it be a recommendation to the Fellowship Rules Committee that each Member Body be entitled to nominate as many persons for the Fellowship as there are declared vacancies, and that a system of preferential voting be instituted.”

– xi –

The Meeting adjourned for lunch, at which the Wellington members of the Council entertained the visiting representatives at the Windsor Hotel.

Afternoon Session: Present: Professor W. N. Benson, Dr. P. Marshall, Dr. G. Archey, Mr. B. C. Aston, Dr. L. H. Briggs, Mr. J. D. H. Buchanan, Professor W. P. Evans, Dr. R. A. Falla, Dr. C. M. Focken, Dr. O. H. Frankel, Dr. L. I. Grange, Dr. J. Marwick, Dr. D. Miller, Dr. W. R. B. Oliver, Mr. A. T. Pycroft, Professor L. R. Richardson, Dr. H. D. Skinner, Mr. R. W. Willett, and the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. S. Cory Wright.

Hon. Treasurer's Report and Balance Sheet: On the motion of the Honorary Treasurer, the report and balance sheet were adopted.

Report of Honorary Treasurer.

In presenting the accounts for the year ended 31st March, 1946, I have the honour to report the Society's finances satisfactory and income just covers essential expenses, with a small surplus. My previous comment of last year still holds, that the small income leaves no margin for any activities outside current routine expenses.

The statement of total receipts and payments shows a credit balance of £1420 3s 5d, as against £1354 9s 6d at 31st March, 1945.

The levy from Member Bodies is £16 more this year, and sales of publications £102, as against £201 last year, while printing costs are £44 more this year.

In the Income and Expenditure Account, which excludes all Trust Accounts, the credit balance is £1100 4s 2d, as against £1070 5s 10d at 31st March, 1945. In addition to this, there is an amount of £282 10s 4d, which has to be taken into account as a credit. This is accrued interest on the Endowment Fund for the years 1943/44, 1944/45, 1945/46, which under resolution of the Standing Committee on the 23rd August, 1945, was allocated for publication expenses.

The Trust Funds are all in a healthy state. In the T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Fund Revenue Account there is a credit balance of £172 15s 4d, and at the end of the next financial year the amount will be sufficient to furnish two prizes of £100 each, the last prize being awarded in 1936.

Stock to the value of £925 (Hutton, Carter, Library, and Endowment Funds) maturing on the 15th April, 1946/49 was re-invested in the Conversion Loan issued by the Government early in 1946 at par in 3% Stock. An amount of £75, Endowment Fund Reserve Bank shares also fell due and has been redeemed. This is now in the Post Office Savings Bank Account.

(Signed)

S. Cory-Wright

, Hon. Treasurer.

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Analysis of Member Bodies' Balance Sheets.
Member Body. Members. Receipts. £ Expenditure. £ Levy. £ s. Rule 3.
Auckland Institute 651 13,480 12,252 55 7 Library
Museum
Levy
Wellington Branch 324 274 284 54 1 Library
Levy
Canterbury Branch 169 21 187 35 10 Library
Levy
Otago Branch 158 210 143 44 0 Levy
Nelson Institute 2,630 2,301 Library
Nelson Phil. Society 55 18 22 9 18 Levy
Hawke's Bay and Southland Branches have not yet sent in their balance sheets.
– xii –

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Statement of Receipts and Payments for the Year Ended March 31, 1946.
Receipts.
£ s. d.
Balance at 31st March, 1945 1,354 9 6
Government Annual Grant 750 0 0
Levy, Volume 74, Transactions, R.S.N.Z 215 16 6
Sales of Publications 102 8 3
Travelling Expenses: Member Bodies 26 3 4
Favourable Exchange 7 4 0
Contributions Towards Wreath 1 11 6
Interest, P.O. Savings Bank Account 16 1 2
Endowment Fund Interest 79 11 0
Hector Memorial Fund Interest 52 10 3
Hutton Memorial Fund Interest 71 13 2
Carter Library Legacy Interest 6 10 7
T. K. Sidey Summer-time Fund Interest 24 17 4
Plant Diseases Trust Fund Interest 16 14 10
Cockayne Memorial Fund Interest 12 7 6
Hamilton Memorial Fund Interest 2 3 6
Transfer Hector Fund P.O.S.B. A/c. to Bank of N.Z. 50 0 0
£2,790 2 5

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Payments.
£ s. d.
Printing: Vol. 74 (3, 4), 75 (1, 2) 627 11 8
Salary 360 0 0
Charges (Telephone, Audit, Bank, Wreath) 8 1 6
Petty Cash (Hon. Editor and Secretary) 16 14 2
Stationery 7 5 2
Binding 30 0 0
Travelling Expenses 44 17 3
Research Grants 31 13 6
Insurance Premium 6 15 1
Trust Funds Audit Fee 1 1 6
Hector Prize and Engraving Medal 50 13 0
Adjustments between Bank of N.Z. and Trust A/cs. 18 13 0
Interest paid direct to P.O.S.B. Accounts 166 13 2
Balance as Under 1,420 3 5
£2,790 2 5

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£ s. d.
Bank of New Zealand 167 5 11
Post Office Savings Bank 1,244 17 8
Cash in Hand 4 13 8
Petty Cash in Hand 3 6 2
£1,420 3 5
– xiii –

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Statement of Assets and Liabilites as at March 31, 1946.
Liabilities.
£ s. d.
Hector Memorial Fund Capital Account 1,184 18 1
Hector Memorial Fund Revenue Account 79 5 3
Hutton Memorial Fund Capital Account 1,506 8 6
Hutton Memorial Fund Revenue Account 395 15 11
Sidey Summer-time Fund Capital Account 539 7 0
Sidey Summer-time Fund Revenue Account 172 15 4
Cockayne Memorial Fund Capital Account 249 12 0
Cockayne Memorial Fund Revenue Account 38 6 10
Hamilton Memorial Fund Capital Account 74 19 2
Hamilton Memorial Fund Revenue Account 3 11 3
Carter Library Legaey Capital Account 162 19 0
Carter Library Legacy Revenue Account 13 18 9
Plant Diseases Trust Capital Account 542 13 5
Plant Diseases Trust Revenue Account 50 6 6
Endowment Fund Capital Account 2,114 2 5
Endowment Fund Revenue Account 283 12 7
Research Grants Fund 90 7 0
Otago Daily Times Co., Ltd.: Printing 87 11 0
Balance of Assets over Liabilities 1,100 4 2
£8,690 14 2

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Assets.
£ s. d.
Hector Mem. Fund: Ins. Stock (face value £1,250) 1,184 18 1
Hector Mem. Fund: P.O.S.B. A/c. (owes Gen. A/c. £1 16s) 81 1 3
Hutton Mem. Fund: Ins. Stock (face value £1,570) 1,506 8 6
Hutton Memorial Fund: P.O.S.B. Account 395 15 11
Sidey Summer-time Fund: Ins. Stock (face value £510) 500 2 6
Sidey Summer-time Fund: P.O.S.B. A/c. (owes Gen. Account £1 2s 6d) 213 2 4
Cockayne Mem. Fund: Ins. Stock (face value £260) 249 12 9
Cockayne Mem. Fund: P.O.S.B. A/c. (owes Gen. A/c. £63 12s 6d) 101 19 4
Hamilton Mem. Fund: Ins. Stock (face value £60) 60 0 0
Hamilton Mem. Fund: P.O.S.B. A/c 18 10 5
Carter Legacy: Ins. Stock (face value £160) 162 19 0
Carter Legacy: P.O.S.B. A/c. (owes Gen. A/c. 12s 6d) 14 11 3
Plant Diseases: Ins. Stock (face value £500) 500 0 0
Plant Diseases: P.O.S.B. A/c. (owes Gen. A/c. 5s) 93 4 11
Endowment Fund: Ins. Stock (face value £2,145) 2,114 2 5
Endowment Fund: P.O.S.B. A/c. (part Gen. A/c.) 283 12 7
Post Office Savings Bank Account 961 5 1
Bank of New Zealand 167 5 11
Cash in Hand 4 13 8
Petty Cash in Hand 3 6 2
Sundry Debtors 74 2 10
£8,690 14 2

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Property Assets: Estimated and Insured Value.
Est. Value. Ins. Value.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
Library and Stack Room in Victoria University College 11,592 12 0 4,500 0 0
Furniture 40 0 0
Stock Stored in Room in Cellar, Parliament Buildings 500 0 0
Carter Library, Dominion Museum (jointly owned by Dominion Museum) 500 0 0
£5,540 0 0
– xiv –

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Revenue Account for the Year Ended March 31, 1946.
Expenditure.
£ s. d.
To Printing Vol. 74 (4), 75 (1, 2, 3) 715 2 8
" Stationery 7 5 2
" Salary 360 0 0
" Petty Cash (Secretary, Hon. Editor) 16 14 2
" Charges 6 1 1
" Travelling Expenses 18 13 11
" Balance 1,100 4 2
£2,224 1 2

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Income.
£ s. d.
By Balance, March 31, 1945 1,070 5 10
" Annual Government Grant 750 0 0
" Levy, Volume 74 215 16 6
" Cockayne Memorial Fund: Cost of Cockayne Memorial Paper No. 1 63 10 6
" Trust Funds Administration Expenses 5 2 6
" Library Fund for Binding Costs 28 6 4
" Sales of Publications 90 19 6
£2,224 1 2

(Sgd.) S. Cory-Wright, Honorary Treasurer.

The Audit Office, having examined the balance sheet and accompanying accounts, required by law to be audited, hereby certifies them to be correct.

J. P. Rutherford

, Controller and Auditor-General.

– xv –

Trust Accounts for the Year Ended March 31, 1946.

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Hector Memorial Fund.
Dr.
£ s. d.
To Hector Prize 50 0 0
" Engraving Medal 0 13 0
" Administration Exs. 1 3 0
" Balance 1,264 3 4
£1,315 19 4

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested 1,184 18 1
" Balance Revenue Account, 31/3/45 78 11 0
" Interest 52 10 3
£1,315 19 4
By Bal. Capital A/c. £1,184 18 1
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 79 5 3

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Hutton Memorial Fund.
Dr.
£ s. d.
To Administration Exs. 1 3 0
" Balance 1,902 4 5
£1,903 7 5

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested 1,506 8 6
" Balance Revenue Account, 31/3/45 325 5 9
" Interest 71 13 2
£1,903 7 5
By Bal. Capital A/c. £1,506 8 6
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 395 15 11

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T. K. Sidey Summer-time Fund.
Dr.
£ s. d.
To Administration Exs. 1 2 6
" Balance 712 2 4
£713 4 10

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested and in P.O.S. Bank 536 17 4
" Balance Revenue Account, 31/3/45 151 10 2
" Interest to Rev. A/c. 22 7 8
" Interest to Cap. A/c. 2 9 8
24 17 4
£713 4 10
By Bal. Capital A/c. £539 7 0
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 172 15 4

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Cockayne Memorial Fund.
Dr.
To Administration Exs. 0 5 0
" Cockayne Memorial Paper 63 10 6
" Balance 287 18 10
£351 14 4

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested 249 12 0
" Balance Revenue Account, 31/3/45 89 14 10
" Interest 12 7 6
£351 14 4
By Bal. Capital A/c. £249 12 0
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 38 6 10
– xvi –

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Hamilton Memorial Fund.
Dr.
£ s. d.
To Administration Exs. 0 5 0
" Balance 78 10 5
£78 15 5

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested and in P.O.S. Bank 73 17 5
" Balance Revenue Account, 31/3/45 2 14 6
" Interest to Rev. A/c. 1 1 0
" Interest to Cap. A/c. 1 1 9
2 3 6
£78 15 5
By Bal. Capital A/c. £74 19 3
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 3 11 3

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Carter Library Legacy.
Dr.
£ s. d.
To Administration Exs. 0 12 6
" Balance 176 17 9
£177 10 3

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested 162 19 0
" Balance Revenue Account, 31/3/45 8 0 8
" Interest 6 10 7
£177 10 3
By Bal. Capital A/c. £162 19 0
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 13 18 9

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Plant Diseases Trust.
Dr.
£ s. d.
To Administration Exs. 0 5 0
" Balance 592 19 11
£593 4 11

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested and in P.O.S. Bank 542 13 5
" Balance Revenue Account, 31/3/45 33 16 8
" Interest 16 14 10
£593 4 11
By Bal. Capital A/c. £542 13 5
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 50 6 6

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Endowment Fund.
Dr.
£ s. d.
To Administration Exs. 1 8 0
" Balance 2,397 15 0
£2,399 3 0

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Cr.
£ s. d.
By Capital Invested 2,114 2 5
" Balance Revenue Account 31/3/45 189 8 5
" Interest 95 12 2
£2,399 3 0
By Bal. Capital A/c. £2,114 2 5
" Bal. Revenue A/c. 1 2 3
" Bal. Allocated to Publication Exps. 282 10 4
Standing Committee Meeting, 23rd August, 1945, p. 73, Minute Book.
– xvii –

Hon. Editor's Report: On the motion of Dr. Marwick, seconded by Dr. Archey, the report of the Honorary Editor was adopted.

Report of Honorary Editor.

During the year ended 31st March, 1945, the four parts of Volume 75, Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand, have been printed.

They comprise 538 pages and 44 plates compared with 492 pages and 63 plates in the previous year.

The subject of the papers in Volume 75 are as follows:—

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Subjects. No. of Papers Pages. Plates. Figures and Graphs.
Chemistry 1 15 2
Geology 6 95 7 15
Palaeontology 1 22
Botany 10 128 6 1
Zoology 17 208 30 35
Miscellaneous 1 8 2

The following manuscripts have been handled during the year:—

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Printed in Volume 75 36
In the press (Volume 76, Part I) 7
Returned to authors for revision 3
Suspended at author's request 1
Printed in Journal of Science and Technology 1
Declined 3
In hand 6
Total 57

The time between final receipt of papers and their publication has been 6 ½ months, the longest time 11 months and the shortest time 3 ½ months.

Sincere thanks are again tendered to the Assistant Editor, Dr C. O. Hutton, and to the referees who have so carefully carried out their work.

(Signed)

J. Marwick.

Dr. Marshall moved a very hearty vote of thanks to the retiring Editor, Dr. J. Marwick, for his services as Honorary Editor over a period of eight years. The office of Editor involved a great deal of work and time, and he assured Dr. Marwick that this was recognised and appreciated by the Society. The motion was carried by acclamation.

Hon. Associate Editor: Dr. C. O. Hutton, who had resigned from this office on account of an appointment at Otago University, was also cordially thanked for his services.

Publication Expenses: On the motion of Dr. Grange, seconded by Dr. Archey, it was resolved that the interest from the Endowment Fund be allotted annually for publication purposes.

N.Z. University Press: It was resolved that a slip announcing the fact that the N.Z. University Press had been established and would undertake the publication of books and papers be inserted in the Transactions for distribution.

Hon. Librarian's Report: On the motion of Professor Evans, the report of the Honorary Librarian was adopted.

Report of Honorary Librarian.

Exchanges: Since postal facilities betwen countries have been restored there has been a constant influx of publications, more especially from neutral countries where the publication of scientific periodicals appears to have been uninterrupted by the war.

– xviii –

Space in the Library is becoming severely taxed, and there appears to be no immediate relief forthcoming, as Victoria University College, in common with all such institutions, is experiencing great difficulty in providing accommodation for the large number of students enrolling. There are plans for building extension in the future, however, and in the meantime the only course that can be suggested is for a few additional shelves.

Binding: With the exception of six sets of Maori Art bound in brown buckram binding has been at a standstill. The binder has far more work than he can cope with, but he has promised to complete a portion of the Society's binding by May.

The Library is fulfilling a good work, as is evidenced by so many requests through the inter-loan system for literature for workers doing essential research throughout New Zealand. The Staff and the Honours Students also find it invaluable in their work.

(Signed)

W. P. Evans

, Honorary Librarian.

Bequest: The Public Trustee advised that the late Mr. G. V. Hudson had bequeathed to the Royal Society of New Zealand his entomological library. Some correspondence concerning certain of the books in that library was read, and on the motion of Professor Richardson, seconded by Dr. Oliver, it was resolved: “That this Council approves the transfer of four selected volumes from the library of the late Mr. Hudson to Mrs. W. H. Gibbs, his daughter, as an action within the Council's understanding of the late Mr. Hudson's wishes.”

It was resolved, on the motion of Professor Richardson, seconded by Dr. Oliver, “That the volumes desired by Dr. J. T. Salmon be transferred to the custody of the Dominion Museum for the time being.”

It was further resolved, on the motion of Professor Richardson, seconded by Dr. Oliver: “That the manuscript of the late Mr. Hudson's book, entitled ‘Fragments.’ be placed in the hands of Dr. J. T. Salmon until published.”

Research Grantees: The reports of the research grantees were approved. Dr. G. H. Uttley asked permission to retain the micro-photographic camera purchased under the grant and refund the purchase money. On the motion of Mr. Willett, seconded by Dr. Marshall, this permission was granted.

Reports of Research Grantees.

Misses E. J. Batham and B. I. Brewin, who in 1944 were granted £15 for research on the plankton and coastal rock fauna at Portobello Marine Biological Station, Otago Harbour, reported on the 26th April, 1945, that plankton has been collected under standard conditions from the beginning of October, 1944. Research work on plankton and rock fauna is being continued, and some further expenditure has been incurred.

Dr. L. H. Briggs, who in 1943 was granted £25 for investigation of essential oils, reported on the 15th April that the fractionating column, part of which had to be replaced because of damage in transit, arrived too late last year to be of value, and the erection of the still is being undertaken at the present time, but no report can yet be made on its use.

Dr. L. H. Briggs was granted £60 in 1945 for the purchase of a Hydrophil Balance. This has been ordered from U.S.A., but has not yet been delivered.

Dr. Briggs expresses his sincere thanks to the Society for its assistance.

Dr. G. H. Uttley, who in 1929 was granted £35 for research on Bryozoa, reports that the research is still proceeding and the work on the Bryozoa material which he has in hand should be finished at the end of next year. No further expenditure has been incurred.

– xix –

Dr. Uttley further states that owing to pressure of his ordinary duties and outside demands on his time he has been unable to finalise for publication a number of papers already prepared. Now, however, he is living in retirement and is able to devote all his time to the work.

He inquires whether the Society will allow him to retain the micro-photographic camera after the work is completed. He is quite willing to refund its purchase money and feels that if this is agreed to the grant will have assisted him and the Society will have been put to no expense at all.

Hutton Grants.

Dr. R. A. Falla and Mr. A. W. B. Powell were granted £40 for research on the Molluscan and Bird Fauna of the Subantarctic Islands. There is an unexpended balance of £5 14s 9d which will be absorbed by the purchase of reels and containers for the films and a set of titles.

The grant was expended in the purchase of 16 mm. films, replacing a lost dredge and gear, and in fares for five trips to Wellington and Dunedin in connection with the research.

Dr. F. J. Turner, who in 1941 and 1942 was granted £50 for research on Metamorphic Rocks, reported on the 15th April that as he will shortly be leaving New Zealand, he wishes to relinquish the unexpended balance of his grant, namely, £6 2s 6d.

During the past year a paper by Mr. J. J. Reed on Scheelite Deposits of Glenorchy was published in the Transactions, and the author acknowledges the fact that the cost of the oriented sections upon which much of the work was based was defrayed from the above Hutton Grant. Dr. Turner still has a good deal of unpublished work on hand involving study of oriented sections of schists, gneisses, etc., the cost of which has already been met by this grant. He hopes to complete and publish this work during the next year or two in California, and will return the sections to the Otago University collections, in which they are already catalogued.

Dr. Turner expresses his appreciation of the continued financial assistance given to him by the Society from the Hutton and other research funds during his twenty years of geological research in New Zealand.

Professor B. J. Marples, who in 1938 was granted £20 for research on the Little Owl and a Biological Survey of Green Island, reported that as he was absent from New Zealand during the whole of last summer, being engaged on a field collecting trip to Western Samoa, no further work on the Survey has been accomplished, nor on the vertebrate palaeontology at Duntroon.

Dr. B. H. Mason, who in 1945 was granted £25 for a geological examination of the Mandamus-Pahau area in the Culverden district, reported on the 27th March that the work presents certain special problems, especially the occurrence of igneous intrusions within the Hokonui series, and a succession of Tertiary beds markedly different from that in the adjacent Waikari-Weka Pass area. The nature of the problems encountered have, however, required that a recon-naisance be made of an extensive area surrounding that selected for detailed mapping.

Six visits have been made to the area, varying in duration from two days to one week. The greater part of the Mandamus-Pahau area has been geologically mapped on a scale of 40 chains to one inch. The stratigraphical succession has been worked out in detail and, thanks to the work of Dr. H. J. Finlay on the Foraminifera, it has been possible to correlate the different formations with the standard New Zealand time scale.

A start has been made with the laboratory examination of the igneous rocks of the area. It is hoped to complete the fieldwork in this area during 1946 and to present a paper describing the results obtained. £14 of the grant has been expended.

Miss L. B. Moore, who in 1945 was granted £10 for the study of marine algae on the New Zealand coast, reported that she has not yet utilised any portion of the grant.

Mr. L. E. Richdale, who was granted £20 for ornithological research at Stewart Island, reported that, acting on medical advice, he did not proceed to Stewart Island in the 1945–46 season. The research, however, will continue, as many birds and burrows have been effectively marked.

– xx –

Tongariro National Park: On the motion of Dr. Marshall the report of the representative on the Tongariro National Park Board was adopted.

Tongariro National Park Board.

Report of Representativc.

A meeting of the Board was held on 16th March, 1946.

It was reported that some damage had been done to the forest of the National Park at Ohakune, an area of bush at the entrance to the mountain track being burned. Application by a milling firm to purchase and mill the burnt timber was refused.

The Chateau has now been handed back to the Board, but a good deal of renovation to the building is required.

The cruption of Mount Ruapehu has done no damage to the building, but has caused serious trouble in connection with the water supply.

P. Marshall.

National Art Gallery and Dominion Museum: On the motion of Dr. Marshall, seconded by Professor Evans, the report of the representatives on the Board of Trustees was adopted.

National Art Gallery and Dominion Museum.

Report of Representatives of the Society on the Board of Trustees.

The Chairman informed the Board that the military forces were vacating the Museum building. Advice, however, indicates that action is progressing but slowly.

A valuable bequest of Japanese ivories has been made to the Museum under the will of the late Mr. W. Wallis.

Another bequest is one of period furniture by the late Mrs. Elgar, of Masterton.

P. Marshall.
W. P. Evans.

Occupation of Museum: The Wellington Branch wrote drawing attention to the unsatisfactory progress being made in transferring the Air Force from the Museum. Professor Richardson spoke strongly in support of the Wellington Branch protest, stating that although several efforts had been made, it had been impossible to obtain an interview with the Prime Minister in regard to the matter. The Museum had been in use by the Forces for four years, and although certain rooms had been vacated, other drafts of the Permanent Air Force had been transferred to the Museum from Anderson Park.

Dr. Oliver referred to the damage that had been caused to the Museum and Art Gallery and the length of time that would be entailed by repair work after the Museum had been vacated by the Forces.

On the motion of Professor Richardson, seconded by Mr. Pycroft, it was resolved that the Royal Society lead a deputation to the Prime Minister in an endeavour to have the Museum returned to public use.

It was resolved that the Standing Committee, led by Professor Richardson and Dr. Marshall, be the deputation from the Royal Society.

Great Barrier Reef Committee: On the motion of Dr. Oliver, the report of the Great Barrier Reef Committee was adopted.

– xxi –

Great Barrier Reef Committee.

Report of Representative.

Two meetings were held during 1945. The Committee's activities were mainly suspended during the war; but it is now intended to resume investigations, attention being first given to obtaining aerial photographs from the services and the publication of papers on the Reef.

A comprehensive report on air photograph was submitted by Flight Lieutenant R. W. Fairbridge.

Lieutenant-Colonel Whitehouse outlined the need for coral reef investigation for military requirements and suggested that the Committee should accept responsibility for the work.

A financial statement showed balance in hand as: Bonds £1.300, cash £498 13s 5d.

W. R. B. Oliver.

The Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture: On the motion of Dr. Oliver, the report of the representative on the Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture was adopted.

Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture.

Report of Representative.

Considerable improvements have been made in the Journal, beginning with Volume 15. A wider range of articles has been published giving more varied and useful information than hitherto. The cover has been made more attractive by the inclusion of an illustration. On account of conditions inseparable from the aftermath of war, it has not been possible to issue the Journal at regular intervals.

The annual conference for 1946 was held in Timaru and was a most successful function. The title of the Banks Lecture, given by Mr. M. J. Barnett, was “The History and Development of Tree Planting in Canterbury.”

Considerable attention has been given to the future activities of the Institute, and sub-committees set up to report on education, research, publicity, publication, accommodation, membership, and finance.

W. R. B. Oliver.

Carter Observatory Board: The report of the representatives on the Carter Observatory Board was adopted.

Carter Observatory Board.

Report of Representatives.

I have to advise that since the presentation of the last report, Dr. C. E. Adams and Mr. R. A. McIntosh tendered their resignations as members of the Carter Observatory Board. Mr. R. G. Dick, Surveyor-General, Lands and Survey Department, and Mr. R. C. Hayes, Acting-Director of the Dominion Observatory, were appointed to fill the vacancies.

Mr. M. M. F. Luckie was re-elected Chairman of the Board.

In June applications were invited for the position of Director of the Observatory. Six applications were received, and Mr. I. L. Thomsen, Assistant Director, was appointed to fill the vacancy and took up the appointment on the 1st October, 1945, after a period of over three years' service with the Navy.

In November, His Excellency the Governor-General, Sir Cyril Newall, visited the Carter Observatory for the purpose of inspecting the building and the telescope. His Worship the Mayor, Mr. Will Appleton, and Mr. M. S. Butterton, Secretary of the New Zealand Astronomical Society, were also present. His Excellency was conducted over the building by the Chairman, Director, and Members of the Board, after which afternoon tea was dispensed.

The Observatory was re-opened to the public in February, 1946, after a lapse of four years, and the attendance on the first and subsequent weeks showed that by a resumption of public nights the Observatory was fulfilling a function very much appreciated by the public. The Director has inaugurated classes on Elementary Observational Astronomy, and classes from the Teachers' Training College have also attended lectures on Astronomy.

– xxii –

Unfortunately, the Board is severely handicapped in regard to the expansion of its activities by lack of finance; its two main sources of income consisting of annual grants from the Wellington City Council and the Government, which for the year ended 31st March, 1946, amounted to only £875.

During the year the Board held five meetings, but from now on it is proposed that monthly meetings be held on the fourth Thursday in the month.

For and on behalf of the Representatives of the Royal Society of New Zealand,

C. G. G. Berry.


(Dr. Barnett is absent in the United States.)

Observatories' Committee: A letter was received from the Chairman of the Observatories' Committee stating that again no meetings of the Committee had been held and asking the views of the Council as to the best means of bringing the Committee into operation again. It was decided that the other nominating bodies to the Committee should be asked to co-operate in calling a meeting of the Committee.

T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Award: It was reported that sufficient interest had accumulated in the T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Fund to enable two awards to be made. Some discussion ensued regarding the interpretation of the terms of the award, and on the motion of Dr. Focken, seconded by Dr. Grange, it was resolved: “That the next award of the T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Medal and Prize be made in 1947 and that the Standing Committee interpret in the advertisement the terms of the Trust as broadly as possible.”

Hamilon Award: On the motion of Dr. Archey, seconded by Dr. Grange, it was resolved to make the next Hamilton Award in 1947.

Hutton Grants: The following applications for Hutton Grants were, on the recommendation of the Standing Committee, approved:

  • Mrs. E. A. Hodgson, £5, for the purchase of two books on Hepaticae.

  • Mr. J. B. Mackie, £30, for research on the regional structure of the schists of Northern and Central Otago.

  • Mr. D. W. McKenzie, £44, for aerial photographs in connection with a geographic study of Wellington.

  • Mr. R. J. McLaughlan, £30, for geological work on the Haurangi Range area in the eastern portion of the Wellington Province.

  • Mr. Te Punga, £30, for work in connection with geological aspects of palaeo-botany and petrography.

Rules re President and Vice-President: The Wellington Branch having given notice to introduce rules for the election of President and Vice-President, the following were approved:—

1.

The President and Vice-President shall be elected annually by ballot at the Annual Meeting of the Society from nominations as provided hereinafter. If there be no valid nominations then the election shall be made by resolution of the Council.

– xxiii –
2.

The Secretary of the Royal Society shall before the 15th February in each year notify the Secretaries of Member Bodies of the rule calling for nominations for the offices of President and Vice-President.

3.

The Council of each Member Body may nominate one member of the Royal Society for each of the offices of President and Vice-President. Such nominations must be accepted in writing by the nominee and the nominations must be in the hands of the Secretary of the Royal Society not later than the last day of March in each year.

4.

The Secretary shall, within three weeks of the last day of receiving nominations send a list of nominees to each Member Body showing for each name the office or offices for which he has been nominated and the name of the nominating Member Body.

5.

Any member of the Royal Society may be nominated for both offices in the same year. No President or Vice-President shall remain in office for more than two years successively.

Retiring President: The Canterbury Branch forwarded the following resolution: “That the Standing Committee be asked to review the position with a view to having the rules amended so that the retiring President may remain on the Council.” The Standing Committee had referred this matter to the Annual Meeting for con sideration.

Dr. Falla moved, Dr. Frankel seconded: “That the Act be amended to allow of the retiring President remaining on the Council.”

It was pointed out that there was provision under Clause 4 (ii) in the Act to co-opt “any fit person to be a member of the Council,” and, if desired, the retiring President could be so co-opted.

The mover and seconder consequently withdrew their motion.

Fellowship Representation: A motion that the Fellows should have direct representation on the Council, on being put to the meeting, was lost.

Science Congress: It was reported that the Wellington Branch had agreed to organise a Science Congress in Wellington in 1947. The Standing Committee was authorised to fix the date of the Congress.

Calendar Reform: Dr. C. M. Focken moved that the question of Calendar Reform be referred to the Member Bodies for consideration and report to the Secretary.

Wild Life Control: As no reply had been received from the Prime Minister, it was decided to forward to him a second letter submitting the proposals of the Wild Life Control Committee, which had been approved at the 1945 Annual Meeting.

Secrecy in Science: On the motion of Dr. Frankel, seconded by Dr. Falla, the following resolution was carried: “That the Council of the Royal Society gives its support to the principles expressed by Sir Henry Dale, past President of the Royal Society of London, in

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the anniversary address to the Society delivered on November 30, 1945, ‘The Mission of Science,’ published in Nature, December 8th, 1945. In particular, this Council follows Sir Henry Dale in affirming the serious danger to science from the intrusion of secrecy, which is alien to its spirit; and in claiming for science freedom from secrecy and freedom from national barriers.

“That this resolution be forwarded to the Prime Minister and handed to the press.”

Honorary Treasurer: On the motion of Dr. Archey, seconded by Professor Richardson, it was resolved: “That the Council affirms the principle of the Honorary Treasurer being a full member of the Council and that the Hon. Minister for Scientific and Industrial Research be requested to introduce into Parliament the necessary amendment to ‘The Royal Society of New Zealand Act, 1933.’”

Annual Grant: After some discussion on the report on the request for an increased grant given by Dr. Marsden, it was resolved, on the motion of Mr. Pycroft, seconded by Dr. Briggs, that the President and the Standing Committee again approach the Minister to use his endeavour to have the annual grant increased. Dr. Briggs further pointed out the need for the Society to have a Research Grant Fund from which it could make independent allocations, and he considered the Government should be asked to reinstate the Government Research Grant to the Society.

Adult Education: On the motion of Dr. Frankel, seconded by Dr. Grange, it was resolved that the Committee on Adult Education be invited to hold a meeting or to take other steps to advance the objectives for which it was formed.

Election of Officers: The following officers were elected:—

  • President. Professor W. N. Benson (re-elected).

  • Vice-President, Dr. P. Marshall (re-elected).

  • Hon. Treasurer, Mr. S. Cory-Wright (re-elected).

  • Hon. Editor, Dr. J. Henderson.

  • Hon. Librarian, Professor C. A. Cotton.

  • Co-opted Members—Dr. J. Marwick, Professor W. P. Evans, Dr. H. H. Allan.

  • Managers Trust Funds—Mr. S. Cory-Wright and Dr. W. R. B. Oliver.

  • Representative Great Barrier Reef Committee, Dr. W. R. B. Oliver.

  • Representative the Royal N.Z. Institute of Horticulture, Dr. W. R. B. Oliver.

  • Representatives Observatories Committee—Professor D. C. H. Florance and Professor P. W. Burbidge.

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  • Election of Committees: The following were appointed:—

  • Hector Award Committee: Sir William Benham, Dr. H. J. Finlay, and one to be co-opted.

  • Hutton Award Committee: Dr. H. H. Allan, Dr. D. Miller, Professor W. N. Benson.

  • T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Award Committee: Dr. H. H. Allan, Dr. D. B. Macleod, and Professor C. E. Hercus.

  • Hamilton Award Committee: Dr. R. A. Falla and Professor L. R. Richardson.

  • Library Committee: Professor C. A. Cotton, Professor W. P. Evans, and Dr. H. H. Allan.

  • Wild Life Control Committee: Dr. W. R. B. Oliver (Convener), Dr. H. H. Allan, Dr. G. Archey, Mr. E. F. Stead, Dr. R. A. Falla, Mr. L. E. Richdale.

Votes of Thanks were accorded to Victoria University College Council for the use of the Council Room, to the S.I.R. Department for the use of its Council Room for Standing Committee meetings, to the Press, to the President for presiding at the meeting, and to the Secretary.

Annual Meeting, 1947: Arrangements were left in the hands of the Standing Committee.

Reports of Member Bodies.
Auckland Institute and Museum

Annual Report for the Year 1945–46.

President: Mr. J. C. Rennie, LL.B.

Director: Gilbert Archey, O.B.E., M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S.N.Z.

During the year just passed the position of the Institute and Museum has become more established in that the further financial assistance promised by the contributing Local Bodies has become a fact, and under “The Auckland War Memorial Amendment Act, 1945,” the 24 Local Bodies concerned will commence paying the agreed increased contributions. The splendid co-operation of the Local Bodies enabled the proposed Act to become law. As a direct consequence the Institute and Museum will be enabled to grant long delayed salary increases, to make extra staff appointments, and to acquire much-needed equipment, etc.

As a result of the new Act the North Shore Boroughs, comprising Devonport, Birkenhead, Northcote, and Takapuna, become entitled to elect one extra representative to the Museum Council. This means that in addition to the Mayor of Auckland and the three Auckland City Council nominees there will be other Local Body representatives on the Council. Election of Local Body representatives to the Museum Council will in future coincide with Local Body elections; that is, Local Body representatives on the Council of the Institute and Museum will hold office for three years instead of one year as heretofore. It is felt that this alteration will give the public of Auckland and surrounding districts better representation on the Council.

Services. Notwithstanding reduced staff (owing to war requirements) the services of the Museum have been maintained up to a very high standard.

A full syllabus of evening lectures met with a splendid response from members and from the public, and the popular Sunday afternoon series in the Museum Library were equally well attended.

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The Educational Service has had a record year. Lessons of at least one hour's duration have been given to no less than 38,610 children, 15,000 of whom were from intermediate and secondary schools. These figures are greatly in excess of the best previous years. It is now realised by the Council and staff that if the educational side of the Museum is to be given freedom of development, extra accommodation at the Museum in the way of lecture hall and class rooms is an absolute necessity.

A healthy sign is evident in the ever-increasing number of daily inquiries from the public on a wide variety of topics.

Membership. The year commenced with a membership roll of 651, including 191 Life Members, of whom we have lost 8 by death and 16 by resignations and deletions. A total of 101 members have been elected this year and the roll now stands at 728, of whom 206 are Life Members. The number of new members this year is encouraging, but we must not cease in our effort to reach the objective of 1,000 members. With the growing public interest in the Institute and Museum that objective is not impossible.

Obituary. The death of the following members is recorded with sincere regret; Colonel D. N. W. Murray, Professor T. L. Lancaster, Dr. W. S. Hill, Dr. W. C. MacKnight, Rev. Brother Fergus, Mr. S. W. House, representative of Local Bodies on the Museum Council, and Messrs. J. E. Attwood, A. Kent, and J. R. Rendell.

It is also with great regret that we have to record the death of Mr. Edwin Leece, who was mechanic on the Museum Staff from 1928 to his retirement in 1943.

The death of Mr. S. W. House removes from the Council one of the first of the representatives elected by Local Bodies. It was the Educational Service of the Museum among school children that always appealed to Mr. House, and we shall miss his practical support very much indeed.

Council Meetings. The Council held eight meetings during the past year, all of which were well attended.

Gifts to the Museum. An outstanding gift of the year was a valuable and representative collection of Worcester and Chelsea China presented by Mr. W. G. White, of Hawera. Mr. White's generosity secures for the Museum a collection which in its particular field and within the limits of size is not excelled in the museums of the world. At a meeting of the Council on October 17, 1945, it was resolved that Mr. White's name be submitted to the Annual Meeting for Honorary Life Membership.

A sum of £2,000 as an endowment for cinematography, or for such other purposes as the Council decides, and also a gift of £20 towards the cost of extra book cases in the Library were received from anonymous donors.

Further gifts actually received during the year were: £500 from the Auckland Savings Bank for improvements to the exhibition halls; £100 from the Auckland Electric Power Board; £70 from Mr. R. C. Horton for purchase of a Georgian silver tea set; and £10 10s from Mr. W. R. Collins towards new cases for the White collection of china.

Gifts of 10 guineas towards the Museum funds were received from Messrs. C. A. Whitney, J. J. Craig, and F. E. Montgomery, and gifts of one guinea each from Mr. B. Sladden and the Auckland Kindergarten Association.

We heartily tender our thanks to all donors for their gifts.

Members will call to mind the most handsome gift which the Institute and Museum received last year at the hands of Mr. E. Earle Vaile. Comprising two valuable unencumbered freehold properties, the gift surpasses anything yet received. During the past twelve months these properties have yielded a net revenue of £717. The Trust Board decided to set aside an annual sum of £100 to a reserve fund against possible major repairs to the buildings. This leaves a balance of £617 for the purposes of the trust, and is equal to a return of 3 per cent. on over £20,000. It will be seen that from such gifts as Mr. Vaile's the Museum, being exempt from taxation receives the maximum benefit.

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The main object of this endowment is the purchase of exhibits, preferably Maori artifacts and also rare works on New Zealand and the Pacific area. It is worthy of note that already desirable ethnographical collections and many valuable books have been acquired under the Trust.

Staff. The Director, Dr. Gilbert Archey, was granted leave of absence to take up duties in Malaya with the Civil Affairs Division of the South-East Asia Command. His work is concerned with the preservation of monuments and works of art in the Asiatic countries formerly occupied by the Japanese.

After the departure of Dr. Archey in July last, Mr. A. W. B. Powell was appointed Acting Director. In addition to the administrative duties involved, Mr. Powell has managed to maintain progress with his normal work in the departments of Conchology, Palacontology, and Marine Natural History.

During Dr. Archey's absence, Mr. F. V. Fisher holds the position of Acting Assistant Director.

Mr. Marshall C. Cleland, Librarian, who has completed 35 years on the Museum staff, retired in March of this year.

We are glad to have back with us again Mr. E. G. Turbott and Mr. R. A. Scobie. Mr. Turbott has been serving in the overseas forces and returned to the Museum in January and was appointed Ornithologist and Entomologist.

Mr. Scobie, formerly Educational Officer, has returned after four years' overseas service and expects to resume his duties in May.

Transport. The question of providing improved transport facilities for visitors to the Museum has during the year been taken up with the City Corporation and the Auckland Transport Board, but up to the present no progress has been made. The question is one of pressing importance and now that hostilities have ceased, further representations will be made to the controlling authority.

General. On the evening of January 18, 1946, the Museum was made available to the University College for the purpose of a Conversazione in honour of the visiting members of the University Senate. A film on Little Barrier Island by Mr. E. G. Turbott was shown, and the staff assisted as guide lecturers. The Council was glad of the opportunity of granting this courtesy to the University College.

In spite of rigid economies we have had a hard struggle to make ends meet. We look forward to the coming year, which affords a brighter prospect with the increased funds made possible by the generous support of the contributing Local Bodies.

With an ever-increasing interest, both by the public and by members of the Institute, in the work of the Museum, and with the assured help of the staff, it is certain that the service given by the Museum will continue to meet all demands.

J. C. Rennie

, President.

Report of Chairman of Trust Board.

The endowment funds have increased by £2,803 during the year; this includes £2,000 given by a lady member as a fund for Museum cinematography, £273 Life Members' subscriptions, and the Auckland Savings Bank's donation of £500 to provide revenue for improvements in the exhibition halls. These amounts and mortgage repayments have been invested in New Zealand Inscribed Stock. The investments can all be looked upon as first-class and there are no interest payments in arrears.

The Edward Earle Vaile Trust Accounts comprise only three quarterly returns. Including the last quarter's proceeds, received after 31st March, the Trust has earned a net income of £717–£386 was spent on collections and books, and after the Obsolescence Reserve, at present £86 18s 4d, has been brought up to £100, there will remain £231 immediately available at the beginning of the new financial year for the purposes of the Trust. Painting and maintenance have been carried out, Mr. Vaile himself generously contributing £24 towards the former.

V. J. Larner.

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Report of Acting Director.

Institute Meetings. The Monday evening lectures at the University College Hall were very well attended. The subjects were topical and covered many aspects of science in relation to the war. In addition, two lectures were arranged by the British Medical Association.

For this excellent syllabus of lectures the members' thanks are due to Dr. J. C. Andrews, F.N.Z.I.C. (“Food Problems of the War”); Professor T. D. J. Leech, B.Sc., B.E. (“The Back Room Boys: The Work of the Engineering Section, D.S.I.R., at the Auckland School of Engineering”); Squadron-leader G. B. Bell, B.E., B.Sc. (“Quiet Workers: The Story of the Engineering Division, Auckland Technical Development Branch, D.S.I.R., 1943–45”); Mr. I. D. Stevenson, M.Sc., A.M.Inst.E.E. (“The Development of Radar”); Dr. R. E. Cooper (“The Dominion Physical Laboratory: Its Functions and Activities”); Professor P. W. Burbidge, M.Sc., B.A. (Res.) (“Physics in the War”); Lieutenant-Colonel E. Marsden, C.B.E., M.C., D.Sc., F.R.S.N.Z. (“Science in the Post-War Years”); Major G. Blake Palmer, N.Z.M.C. (“The Italian Commune: A Study in Civic Development and Anarchy”); Dr. E. G. Sayers (“Allergy”); Colonel Sir Stanton Hicks (“Feeding an Army”).

A most successful new feature was a Saturday afternoon visit to the Plant Research Station. Mount Albert, at the invitation of Dr. G. H. Cunningham.

Three ordinary meetings were held to hear papers presented by Dr. G. Blake Palmer and Messrs. N. G. Stevenson, E. G. Turbott, and A. W. B. Powell.

Sunday Lcctures. Ethnographical, geological, and natural history subjects were covered by the Sunday afternoon lectures in the Museum library. Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Clemesha, “The Indus Valley Civilisation”; Professor Arnold Wall, “Alpine Plants of New Zealand”; Dr. G. Blake Palmer, “The Berber People of North Africa”; Mr. C. C. Comyns, “Hall Marks: Their History and Significance”; Miss M. W. Crookes, “Plant Folk-lore”; Mr. V. F. Fisher, “Native Life in Polynesia”; Captain G. A. Humphreys-Davies, “Buddhas”; Mr. A. W. B. Powell, “New Zealand's Geological Past.”

Anthropology and Maori Race Section. The Section has managed throughout the war period to function successfully, despite fewer meetings and a reduced membership. During the last year there were 30 financial members.

Lectures were given by Major Holland, Dr. G. B. Palmer, and Messrs. K. Harawira, H. E. Maude, and V. F. Fisher.

The officers for the year were: Chairman, Mr. A. D. Mead; Vice-Chairmen, Messrs. R. A. Scobie and A. T. Pycroft; Hon. Secretary, Mrs. E. G. Turbott; Committee—Miss O. L. G. Adams, Miss L. Chrisp, and Messrs. V. F. Fisher, G. Graham, and J. Paykel.

With the return of normal conditions the Section looks forward to enlarged activities and a considerable increase in membership.

A. W. B. Powell.

The Wellington Branch of the Royal Society of New Zealand (Inc.)

Seventy-eighth Annual Report, being the Report of the Council for the Year ended 30th September, 1945.

Council: The Council has held eight meetings during the year under review. The President, Mr. H. S. Lamburd, who left for overseas in connection with his business, was granted leave of absence by the Council, and since July his place has been filled by the Vice-President, Dr. J. K. Dixon.

Membership: Forty-six new members have been elected during the year. This figure includes 24 full members and 22 associate members. Four members have resigned during the year, two have died, two have been transferred to other Branches of the Royal Society, and two have been removed from the books on account of their correspondence being returned through the post, leaving a total membership at 30th September, 1945, of 324–255 full, 69 associates. An application form with details of the size and objects of the Branch appended was printed early in the session and has been a valuable aid in recruiting new members.

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Syllabus: The meetings of the Society and most meetings of the Sections have continued to be held at Victoria College, and the Council wishes again to express its thanks to the Victoria College Council for the facilities placed at the disposal of the Society. Following is a list of the meetings held during the year:—

General Meetings: October 25, 1944, Annual General Meeting, followed by a screening of educational and scientific films. May 2, 1945, Presidential Address, “Wind Energy as a Possible Future Source of Power,” by Mr. H. S. Lamburd. May 23, 1945, Address by Mr. Sydney Greenbie, “Trends in Education in the United States.” June 27, 1945, Address by Rev. D. D. Scott, D.D., M.A., LL.B., “Is There a Science of Psychical Research?” July 25, 1945, Address by Dr. P. P. Lynch, “The Expert Witness.” August 22, 1945, Address by Mr. F. H. Neumann, “An Introduction to Architecture.” September 26, 1945, Conversazione arranged by the various sections of the Society. This replaced an address that was to have been given by Dr. H. O. Askew, but which had to be postponed on account of the illness of the latter.

Astronomy Section: The following monthly addresses commencing in May, 1945, have been given to the Section: “Solar System,” by Mr. G. T. Railton; “The Sun,” by Mr. I. L. Thomsen; “The Constellations,” by Mr. M. S. Butterton; “Astronomical Instruments,” by Mr. G. T. Railton; and “The Stars,” by Mr. I. L. Thomsen.

Biological Section: The following are the monthly addresses delivered before this Section as from September, 1944: “The Primitive Springtail and Its Importance in Zoogeography,” by Mr. J. T. Salmon; “Beyond the Microscope,” by Dr. I. V. Newman; “Revision of the Current Theory of Echinoderm Embryology. Embryology of the Viviparous Ophiuroid Amphipholus squamata,” by Dr. H. B. Fell; “Study of Soil Fungi in Relation to Root Rot of Wheat in New Zealand,” by Mr. J. H. Warcup; “Possible Future Development of Indigenous Forests in New Zealand,” by Mr. C. M. Smith; “Ocular Lesions in Phenothiozine Poisoning in Calves,” by Mr. L. Whitten; and “On Medicinal Plants,” by Mr. D. Cairns. In October, 1944, the Section held a Symposium to discuss “New Zealand's Contribution to Post-war European Agriculture and Food Relief,” when these persons led the discussion: Dr. I. V. Newman (Introduction), Dr. I. D. Blair (General), Mr. D. Cairns (Seed Production), Dr. W. M. Hamilton (Economic Aspects), Mr. G. M. Pottinger (Meat Products), Mr. A. H. Ward (Dairy Products).

Geology Section: Monthly addresses given before this Section, commencing with September, 1944: “The Geology of Malaya,” by Dr. M. Alexander; “Tertiary Nautiloids in New Zealand,” by Mr. C. A. Fleming; “Advances in Geomorphology in 1943,” by Professor C. A. Cotton; “The First Thirty Years of the Geology Section,” by Mr. M. Ongley; “Origin of the Otaki Sandstone,” by Mr. R. L. Oliver; “The Pegmatites—Source of the World's Largest Crystals and Rarest Elements,” by Dr. C. O. Hutton.

Physics Section: Commencing in April, 1945, the Physics Section has held demonstrations and addresses as follows: “Radio Frequency Heating,” by Mr. K. B. Gilby, B.E.; “Some Research and Development Projects at the Dominion Physical Laboratory,” by a group of speakers; “Recent Developments in Magnetometers,” by Mr. J. Simpson, B.E., M.Sc.; “Measurement and Control of Temperature in Industry,” by Mr. G. S. Marshall; “Some Research and Development Projects at the Radio Development Laboratory,” by a group of speakers; “Radio Propagation and Weather,” by Dr. F. E. S. Alexander.

Social Science Section: The following monthly meetings of the Section have been held as from October, 1944; “Mental Hygiene in New Zealand,” by Dr. E. Beaglehole; “New Zealand and U.N.R.R.A.,” by Mr. G. V. Burton; “Stabilisation in New Zealand,” by Mr. L. C. Webb; “Wartime Monetary Conditions and Public Finance,” by Mr. G. Lawn; “Rehabilitation and Training Facilities for Industrial Occupations,” by Hon. C. F. Skinner; “Psychiatry and Crime,” by Dr. R. W. Medlicott.

Technology Section: The following monthly addresses have been given before the Section, commencing April, 1945: “Experiences of a Communications Engineer Overseas,” by Mr. G. R. Milne, B.Sc., A.M.I.E.E.; “The Chemical Engineer,” by Mr. Maskill Smith; “Wellington Weather,” by Dr. R. G. Simmers;

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“Some Features of a Visit to America, with Special Reference to Bridges and Highways,” by Mr. H. Hume, B.E., B.Sc., A.M.Inst.E.; “Science in a Traditional Industry—Building,” by Mr. J. L. Mandeno. In addition, two visits were made to the Central Park and Khandallah Sub-stations and Exide Batteries, Ltd.

Papers for Publication: During the year advice was received that papers for publication in the Transactions may, during the recess of the Branch, be read before the Council of a Member Body. The following have been read before the Branch during the session just closed:—October 25, 1944: “Notes on the Eggs of New Zealand Paryphantidae with Description of a New Sub-genus,” by Mr. A. C.-O'Connor. “Notes and Synonymy in Some Generic Names of the Collembola,” by Mr. J. T. Salmon. “Cladonema variabilis n.sp. A New Marine Gymnoblastic Hydrozoan from New Zealand Waters,” by Miss P. M. Ralph. May 1, 1945: “A Revision of the Current Theory of Echinoderm Embryology,” by Dr. H. Baraclough Fell. “The Embryology of the Viviparous Ophiuroid Amphipholus squamata Delle Chiage,” by Dr. H. Baraclough Fell. May 23, 1945: “Contributions to the Mineralogy of New Zealand, Part 1,” by Dr. C. O. Hutton. September 26, 1945: “Contributions to a Knowledge of the Naturalized Flora of New Zealand, No. 1,” by Mr. A. J. Healy.

Representation on the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand: Dr. L. I. Grange and Professor L. R. Richardson have continued to represent the Branch.

Dominion Museum Bwilding: As the Branch was unable to secure an appointment with the Prime Minister, the matter was taken over by the Royal Society of New Zealand, who, also, were unable to make any headway in this matter. However, with the cessation of hostilities on all fronts we now learn that the building will be handed back to its owners by the end of November next. The fine facilities and meeting room reserved for the Branch in the Museum building again will be available by the time the 1946 session is due to commence.

Library: Periodicals still continue to arrive at irregular intervals. Many of the books ordered over a year ago have not yet arrived. A substantial order for new books recently has been placed and a further order will be sent forward before the end of this year; but no indication can be given as to when these books will be available to members. Some binding has been completed by the Society's book-binders; but this work still is two years behind. Books from the Scientific Book Club have been delayed apparently on account of printing troubles in England, but a recent advice from our London agents states that several volumes recently have been despatched. These should come to hand in the near future. For the information of members there is attached to this report a list of all the recent accessions to the library over the last four to five years, together with a list of those books at present on order and the current periodicals taken at the library. Members are invited to submit suggestions for additions to the library to the Secretary.

Hector Medal: The congratulations of the Branch were given to Dr. J. Henderson on his receipt of the Hector Medal. The presentation of the Medal was made by Dr. P. Marshall, Vice-President of the Royal Society of New Zealand, at the meeting of the Branch held on 27th June, 1945.

Wild Life Committee: The Branch was associated with the Royal Society of New Zealand and the New Zealand Association of Scientific Workers in a deputation to the Minister of Internal Affairs which requested that portions of the Sounds District National Park should be set aside under scientific management as a Wild Life Sanctuary. The deputation received a very sympathetic hearing from the Minister, who expressed himself as very favourably inclined to the proposals put forward by the deputation.

Ruapehu Eruption. At Dr. Marsden's invitation, a Committee of the Geology Section was set up to consider the Ruapehu Eruption and what could be done to investigate it. Recommendations then were made to the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, who then took action in the matter.

Election of President and Vice-Presidents of the Royal Society: The Branch has proposed rules to regularise the election of these officers of the Royal Society of New Zealand, and this matter will come up for consideration at the next Annual Meeting of that Society.

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Memorials: The sum of £4 4s was voted to assist in the erection of a head-stone on the grave of the late Murray Geddes, a member of the Branch who died while on active service in England last year.

The sum of £5 was voted towards the establishment of a memorial to the late Dr. Coleridge Farr.

Cockayne Memorial: Under the chairmanship of Dr. C. O. Hutton, this matter has again been taken up with the City Council, Government, Mr. Alfred Cockayne, Forest and Bird Protection Society, and other interested bodies, and good progress has been made. It is confidently expected that this matter will be finalised next year.

Observatory: The Observatory is in good order except for a downpipe which requires renewal. The 5in telescope has been kept in working order, but has not been quite so extensively used since the death of Mr. A. G. C. Crust, who had been making good use of it in star colour work.

Thanks: The Council wishes to record its thanks to the Council of Victoria College for continuing to place meeting rooms and facilities at the disposal of the Branch and also their appreciation of and thanks for the services of all persons who have contributed to the success of the meetings of the session just closed.

Canterbury Branch of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Annual Report for the Year 1945.

President: Mr. R. S. Duff. Hon. Secretary: Mr. George Guy.

The Council desires to submit the following report on the year's work to the Annual General Meeting, to be held on Wednesday, December 5, 1945.

Membership: Ordinary membership shows a substantial increase from 133 in 1944 to 159 in 1945. Thirty-five new members were elected during the year, whilst we lost one by death and eight by resignation or transfer.

Associate membership has increased from seven in 1944 to ten in 1945.

Obituary: The Society records with deep regret the loss by death of Mr. Stuart Lindsay, who was widely known in scientific circles as a student of New Zealand insect life and an authority on the rarer moths and butterflies. His leisure time was occupied in the study of insects and in regular correspondence with leading entomologists in New Zealand and abroad. He made many collecting trips in the Canterbury district from which the collections of the Canterbury Museum were enriched, and in 1927 he was appointed Honorary Entomologist to the Museum. Since that time he had the care of a steadily growing collection and he responded generously to the many demands for expert opinion on insect problems; in addition, he gave help and instruction to young students. He published several papers in the Records of the Canterbury Museum, but was more concerned with providing accurate data for others to publish. To mark its appreciation of his scientific work during 23 years' active membership of this Branch, the Council established a fund to purchase a cabinet to house, as a permanent display in the Canterbury Museum, some insect habitat groups prepared by Mr. Lindsay. Further details of this fund are contained in the Hon. Treasurer's report.

Council: Eleven ordinary meetings of the Council were held during the year.

Congratulations are extended to Dr. R. S. Allan, who has been appointed to the Chair of Geology at Canterbury University College, and to Mr. K. B. Cumberland, who has been appointed Lecturer in Charge of the Department of Geography at Auckland University College.

Formation of Social Science Section: As mentioned in the last Annual Report, a suggestion was made to the Branch that it should consider the advisability of establishing Sections. After due consideration a sub-committee recommended that a Social Science Section be established, and as a result the Social Science Section was inaugurated at a meeting held on 10th October, 1945. The objects of the Section are to promote the study and discussion of the social sciences. Membership is open to all members and associate members of the Branch without further payment of subscriptions.

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At the first meeting, Mr. W. R. Geddes, M.A., read a paper entitled “Wartime Changes in a Native Community.”

Further meetings are to be held at least bi-monthly from March to October.

The following officers were elected for the year ending 30th September, 1946: Chairman, Dr. I. L. G. Sutherland; Secretary, Mr. A. J. Danks; Committee—“Mr. K. B. Cumberland, Dr. H. E. Field, Mr. C. G. F. Simkin.

Programme: Nine meetings were held during the year, three ordinary meetings at which papers were read and six evenings devoted to special addresses. A special address was also arranged for one of the ordinary meetings shortly after the first recorded use of the atomic bomb. Mr. C. D. Ellyett, at short notice, gave a popular address on “Splitting the Atom.” This was the best-attended meeting of the year and showed how the Society could gain more support by explaining latest sciéntific developments.

Three of the addresses were on the common theme, “Making New Zealand,” in which geological, botanical, and zoological origins were discussed. These addresses were also well received.

The following addresses were given: “Maori Culture in Time and Space” (Presidential Address), Mr. R. S. Duff. “Science in the Post-war World,” Dr. E. Marsden. “Making New Zealand” address series—No. 1, “The Geological Succession and the Tectonic Framework,” Dr. R. S. Allan; No. 2, “The Major Elements of the Fauna, their Relationships and Origins,” Dr. R. A. Falla; No. 3, “The Major Elements of the Flora, their Relationships and Origins,” Dr. W. R. B. Oliver. “Splitting the Atom (the Theory of the Atomic Bomb), Mr. C. D. Ellyett. “Recent Scientific Investigations on the Sub-Antarctic Islands of New Zealand,” Dr. R. A. Falla.

The following papers were presented:—May: Mr. C. R. Russell spoke to his paper (presented in 1944) on Rotatoria. July: Macleod, D. B., “Some Consequences of a Revised Equation of State” (for Transactions of the Fa [ unclear: ] aday Society of London). B [ unclear: ] ockie. W. B., “Some Notes on the Indigenous Vegetation of the Maruia River and Ada Pass, and Lists of Species.” September: Fry, S. A. A., “Further Notes on the Occurrence of Ganister in Relation to Coal.” Duff, R. S., “A Native Stone Quarry in the Whangamoa District.”

Lectures to Secondary Schools: This winter programme of six evening lectures proved as popular as ever. Attendances ranged from 100 to 140 for the first five lectures in the Canterbury College Hall, whilst between three and four hundred attended Dr. Falla's film evening in the Training College Hall. The programme was as follows:—“Before the Maori Fleet (Digging Up the Moa-hunters),” Mr. R. S. Duff. “Geology from the Air,” Dr. R. S. Allan. “The Use Man Makes of Plants (the Study of Economic Botany),” Mr. N. Lothian. “How Other People Live (Islanders of the Western Pacific),” Mr. W. R. Geddes. “Let's Look at the Weather (An Introduction to Weather Study),” Flying Officer J. Dugdale. “A Scientific Excursion to the Auckland and Campbell Islands” (illustrated by the film “Fifty Degrees South”), Dr. R. A. Falla. The Council wishes to record its thanks to all who have contributed towards the year's programme.

Riccarton Bush: After seventeen years' service as the Society's representative on the Board of Trustees of Riccarton Bush, Mr. C. E. Foweraker tendered his resignation, which was accepted with regret by the Council. Mr. W. B. Brockie was appointed to succeed Mr. Foweraker. Mr. Brockie's report is as follows:—During the past year maintenance work was carried out efficiently; 57 large oak trees at the western end of the bush were cut down in preparation for suitably replanting the area, and the paths, which were completely blocked with broken and bent-over branches as a result of the heavy snowfall on July 14 have been cleared. Visitors to the bush are most numerous on Sundays and public holidays; on one Sunday 260 people were counted entering the main gate. An immense amount of damage to trees and shrubs throughout the bush was caused by the snowfall. Because of the saturated condition of the ground and the high north-west wind which preceded the snowfall, tree roots would be loosened, and the great weight of snow on the branches uprooted and prostrated many of the smalle [ unclear: ] trees, especially ta [ unclear: ] ata. Dense growth of Muehlenbeckia australis on some trees undoubtedly contributed to their destruction. Severe

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frost has killed all the few remaining titoki planted about twenty years ago, and many of the mahoe are so badly frosted it is doubtful if they will recover. As the mahoe in some places constitutes a considerable portion of the undergrowth, increased light will be admitted to the floor of the bush and this will tend to increase the spread of weed growth. Injuries suffered by some of the large white pines have probably resulted in a little permanent damage to the bush. Blackberry is the worst weed, and control of this pest and other self-introduced weeds still presents a major problem. In this connection it must be stated that inadequate finance prevents the employment of sufficient labour to restore the bush effectively to a condition in keeping with its original natural state. To the Ranger, Mr. Leonard Armstrong, the Board is deeply grateful for his full co-operation and willing service during a particularly difficult year.

Arthur Pass Board: The Council has made an attempt to have representation again on the Arthur Pass Board and has forwarded the name of Mr. E. F. Stead to the Commissioner of Crown Lands for possible inclusion on the Board.

Hon. Librarian's Report: Owing to the shortage of skilled binders, many of the Society's books have been at the bindery for over two years. These have recently begun to come back. Many more volumes are ready to be sent shortly, now that bindery conditions are improving.

Arrangements have been made to complete and continue the Proceedings A of the Royal Society of London, chiefly on the income from the C. Coleridge Farr Memorial Fund. The Proceedings B are being received as a presentation from Sir William Benham, F.R.S., formerly Professor of Biology at the University of Otago. Mr C. R. Russell has offered to help towards completing the set of the Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society.

The Society's publications have continued to sell, and stocks of The Natural History of Canterbury have almost been reduced to a point at which further copies will be made available only by Council resolution. There is a stock of some volumes of the Transactions, which are available for sale on the same terms as at the headquarters office in Wellington.

Members continue to use the combined libraries of the Society and Canterbury University College but there are still many members who do not take advantage of their rights. In particular, members outside Christchurch could make more use of the postal service.

C. Coleridge Farr Memorial Fund: The decision of the Council to keep this fund open was rewarded by additional donations during the year amounting to £80 13s 9d. The net total sum is now £537 6s 10d, of which £500 has been invested in Government 3 per cent. Stock. Interest to date amounts to £18 2s 6d. The fund is to be used for continuing the purchase and binding of the Proceedings A of the Royal Society of London. Arrangements in this connection are not yet complete, and the only expenditure to date has been £12 12s for binding.

The Hon. Treasurer wishes to make reference to the numerous and striking tributes paid to the late Dr. Farr by contributors to this fund, who include past students, friends, and organisations with which Dr. Farr was associated. The fund will remain open should any further contributions be contemplated.

Stuart Lindsay Memorial Fund: Reference is made elsewhere in the Report to the work of the late Mr. Stuart Lindsay. A fund was opened to assist in the purchase of a memorial cabinet in the Museum and a total of £15 15s was subscribed and handed over to the Museum authorities.

The Society is grateful to Mr. E. F. Stead for donating the balance of the amount required for this object.

Otago Branch of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Annual Report for Session, 1945.

President: Professor B. J. Marples.

Hon. Secretary: Dr. H. D. Skinner.

Membership: The number of full members was 158, as compared with 153 in 1944; 20 new members were elected, but 15 were lost, comprising 4 deaths, 6 resignations, 3 transfers, and 2 struck off the roll. It is the intention of the Council to carry out a membership campaign in the 1946 session.

Deaths: The Council records with regret the deaths of the following members: Dr. J. E. Holloway, F.R.S., W. J. Morrell, James Black, and R. T. Stewart. Dr. Holloway had, by his intellectual power and unflagging industry, brought

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honour to himself and to his country. Added to intellectual brilliance was a soundness of judgment and a friendliness and courtesy which endeared him to all who met him. A biographical notice will be published in the Transactions of the Royal Society. W. J. Morrell, for many years headmaster of Otago Boys' High School and later Chancellor of the University of Otago, was at one time a regular attender at our meetings and an occasional contributor to discussions. For one session he was a Vice-President of the Society.

Attendances at Main Branch Meetings: These were 50, 30, 36, 100, 100, 40, and 70, giving an average of upwards of 70, probably a record in the history of the Society.

Attendances at Junior Branch Meetings: These have averaged 120, a highly satisfactory figure.

Representatives on Museum Committee: Messrs. Dayus and George Simpson continued to represent this Society.

Representatives on Council of Royal Society: Drs. C. M. Focken and F. J. Turner continued to represent us with efficiency and vigour.

Fellowship of the Royal Society of New Zealand: A Committee set up to report on the rules governing election to fellowship submitted a report which was adopted by our Council, and was circulated among other Member Bodies. It was discussed by the Council of the Royal Society and was referred back to Member Bodies.

T. K. Sidey Summer-Time Fund Declaration of Trust and Rules: A Committee drew up a report on this matter which was adopted by our Council and was circulated among other Member Bodies. The matter was raised by our representatives on the Council of the Royal Society and received general approval. Legal advice has since shown the need of modification of the trust deed.

W. J. Mellor Tablet: The Society took the initiative in erecting a tablet in the Chemistry Department of the University commemorating the work of William Joseph Mellor, D.Sc., F.R.S., Graduate of Otago, the greatest ceramic chemist of his time.

Honours: The Society extends its congratulations to Dr. W. N. Benson, F.R.S., on his election to the Presidency of the Royal Society of New Zealand, and also on the award to him of the Clarke Medal of the Royal Society of New South Wales. It extends congratulations also to Dr. J. C. Eccles, F.R.S., on receiving an invitation from the New York Academy of Sciences to contribute an address to the Symposium on Nerve Physiology, to be held at New York in February, 1946.

Loder Cup: The Society supported the candidacy of Mr. Norman Potts, to whom the cup was awarded.

Conversazione: The annual conversazione in conjunction with the Association of Friends of the Museum was held at the Museum on the evening of October 24. About 200 were present. There was an exhibition of drawings and paintings by George O'Brien and Lily Atty Daff, and a film was shown of life and scenery in the Auckland Islands.

New Sections: The Council welcomes the formation during the session of a Psychology Section and a Scientific Method Section.

Astronomical Section: 1. Membership: 60 full members and 13 associates. 2. Alex. Crust: We regret to record the death of Alex. Crust, M.Sc., who was an early member of the Section. He was a keen and successful astronomer, and did much to popularise its study in New Zealand. 3. Active Service: We look forward to the return of members with the forces, particularly our former Secretary and Observer-Director, enthusiast in the work and tower of strength to the Section. 4. Activities: Public demonstrations at the Observatory were continuous and attendances eclipsed previous records. Approximately 500 people visited the Observatory during the year. All current phenomena were observed and carefully recorded.

Microscopical Section: The only activity was a demonstration to about 150 members of the Junior Branch. A lecture illustrated by film was delivered by Miss Marion Fyfe, and there was an extensive microscope demonstration.

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Junior Branch Meetings: Attendance has averaged 120. Organiser, Dr. Basil Howard. June 1: Miss A. Blackie, M.Sc., “Energy: It Works.” June 15: An officer of R.N.Z.A.F. Station, Taieri: “Metcorology: A Modern Science.” June 29: Mr. C. Hassall, M.Sc.: “Dyes and Dyeing” (in Chemistry Lecture Room). July 13: Dr. W. N. Benson, F.R.S.: “The Building of New Zealand” (with geological exhibits). July 27: Microscope Section, Royal Society: Microscope Demonstration (Medical School). August 10: Mr. G. Batham, B.Sc.: “Hydro-electric Power.”

Main Branch Meetings: April 10: Presidential Address, “Some Examples of Applied Science in Agriculture.” May 8: Captain A. M. Quennell: “Sound Ranging by New Zealand Engineers.” June 12: Dr. C. M. Focken: “A New World Calendar.” July 10: Dr. C. E. Hercus, H. D. Purves, M.Sc., T. H. Kennedy, M.Sc., “Recent Advances in Thyroid Gland Research” (joint meeting with New Zealand Institute of Chemistry, Otago Branch). August 14: Dr. E. Marsden. Wellington, “Scientific Organisation in the Post-War Period.” September 11: Beryl Brewin, M.Sc., “Floating Life in the Sea.” October 9: Joint meeting with Naturalists' Field Club, Dr. W. R. B. Oliver, “The History of the New Zealand Flora.” November 13: Annual General Meeting, presentation of report and balance sheet, election of officers, exhibits from Museum collections.

Original Papers: E. J. Batham, M.Sc., “Description of Female, Male, and Larval of a Tiny Stalked Barnacle, Ibla idiotica n.sp.” Margaret K. Finlayson, M.Sc., “Some Aspects of the Life-history of the Liverwort, Symphyona hymeno-phyllum (Hook.).” George Howes: “Lepidoptera Collecting at the Homer, with Descriptions of New Species.” B. J. Marples, “Notes of Some Neognathous Bird Bone from the Early Tertiary of New Zealand.” William Martin, (1) “The Moss Flora of the Arthur Pass National Park”; (2) “Geographical Range and Internal Distribution of the Mosses Indigenous to New Zealand.” W. N. Benson, F.R.S., (1) “The Quartz Porphyry of Shag Valley.” (2) “Notes on the Suspended Load of the Waimakariri River.”

Hawke's Bay Branch of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

President: Mr. J. D. H. Buchanan. Hon. Secretary: Mr. J. S. Peel.

The Council begs to present the seventy-second Annual Report, being that for the year ended 31st December, 1945.

Meetings: The following meetings were held during the year:—20th September: Annual General Meeting and a paper by Dr. C. D. Costello on “Atomic Energy.” 8th November: Informal meeting held in Hastings to meet Dr. McMahon, wool-metrologist of Lincoln College, who spoke on “Wool Research.” 29th November: General meeting and a paper by Mr. H. H. S. Westwood on “Plastics.”

Sections: At the general meeting held in November, 1945, rules governing the establishment of sections within the Society were adopted. In accordance with these the Hastings Astronomical Society amalgamated with the Royal Society as an Astronomical Section.

A disappointing response to a questionnaire sent to members by the Council suggests that there is not a great demand for the formation of sections at present.

Projector: The last Annual Meeting approved the purchase, at a cost of £170, of a 16 mm. sound projector. To enable the Society to make this purchase, members were invited to assist by donation or guarantee. Donations so far received amount to £42 3s 6d, and guarantees to £10. In the Council's opinion, this purchase should not be undertaken until finance is assured, and it is considered inadvisable to proceed at present.

Bulletins: Two Bulletins were issued, in November and December, and their publication will be resumed when this year's activities begin.

Membership: The membership now stands at 90 members. There is one junior member. Corporate member: The Heretaunga Tramping Club.

Periodicals: The following new periodicals are being taken: Discovery, Science Progress.

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Nelson Philosophical Society.

Annual Report, 1945.

President: Dr. D. Miller. Hon. Secretary: Mr. R. K. Logan.

There have been six monthly meetings during the year:—April 16: Presidential Address by Dr. Miller, “Episodes in the History of N.Z. Entomology.” May 21: “Maori Days,” by Mr. W. J. Phillipps. June 10: “Behind the Light Switch,” by Mr. E. B. Mackenzie. July 6: “Education for Citizenship,” by Miss J. Stewart. August 20: “Life and the Artist,” by Mr. W. H. Allen. September 25: “Purity in Music and the Philosophy of Modernism,” by Mr. J. T. Kirk-Burnnand.

The attendances have fluctuated between 25 and 45. The membership is 55—the same as last year—of which 40 are full members and 15 associate members.

A paper by Mr. B. B. Given, “Trachinid Parasites attacking Melolonthid Larvae in New Zealand,” was read by title and sent to the Royal Society of New Zealand for publication.

In order to put the finances of the Society in a better position, the Committee recommends that consideration be given to the raising of the subscriptions to 10s for a full member and 7s 6d for an associate member.

Southland Branch, Royal Society of New Zealand.

Annual Report, 31/3/46.

President: Miss C. McHaffie. Secretary: Mr. A. D. Nisbet.

Membership: The membership for the year showed neither an increase nor a decrease. Four new members were admitted, while two resigned, one was transferred, and one was lost by death.

To the relatives of the late Mr. W. J. A. McGregor we extend our sympathy.

The membership of the Branch now stands at 40, but with three new members seeking admission it is hoped that the year's working will show that these three are but the forerunners of many who desire to become members of the Branch.

Financial: The conduct of the Society shows in the Expenses and Receipts a loss of £1 13s for the year, and while this cannot be regarded as satisfactory at the same time it is not as serious as would at first seem, because the assets of the Branch have increased from a value of £121 4s 7d to a value of £147 2s 2d. A bad feature of the Balance Sheet is the fact that there is so much money shown as outstanding subscriptions—£24 3s. Of this sum, it is considered that an amount, £5 5s, is not collectable. This leaves a balance of £18 18s outstanding. It cannot be too strongly impressed on the members that subscriptions should be paid promptly in order that the Branch may continue to function well and efficiently.

Lectures: During the year the following lectures were given to well-attended meetings. Our thanks are due to those who so ably prepared and delivered these addresses. The lectures given were as follows:—April 26: Presidential Address by Miss C. McHaffie, “Atoms and Stars.” May 24: Dr. R. I. Gardiner, “Plastics.” June 28: Mr. J. F. Field, “Planting and Maintaining Exotic Forests.” July 26: Dr. G. H. Uttley, “Evolution.” September 26: Miss B. Brewin, “Floating Life on the Sea.” October 24: Mr. C. L. Carter, “Micro Chemistry—Its Applications and Achievements.”

General: The November meeting took the form of a social evening and farewell to Dr. and Mrs. G. H. Uttley. Dr. Uttley was one of the foundation members of the Branch and was also its first President. Since retiring from the office of President, he has been a member of the Council, and his advice and help will be much missed by the Branch. Many tributes were paid to Dr. Uttley by those present. Later Dr. Uttley replied, following which all present enjoyed supper and an hour spent socially. To Dr. and Mrs. Uttley we wish long life and a happy retirement.

Conclusion: Retiring officers wish to thank all who supported them during their term of office and to express the hope that the same support will be accorded the new officers. Since last report was read, hostilities have ceased, and we can look forward to the coming session of our Society with every confidence that the year will be a successful one.